hunting knife

Discussion in 'Hunting Gear Talk' started by nitemare_63, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. nitemare_63

    nitemare_63 New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Indiana
    anyone have any good suggestions on a brand and model of a good fixed blade hunting and overall outdoors knife that does not cost an arm and a leg?
     
  2. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    I bought a buck knife at walmart 4 or 5 years ago for deer hunting. I want to say it was only about $15. It has always kept a sharp edge for me. Keep in mind that I don't use it for anything but feild dressing, skinning, quartering, and deboning the meat. I don't try to cut through the brisket or pelvis bones with it, I have a saw for that. And after each use I give it a touch up sharpenning. But its my favorite knife to use on deer, not too big but just the right size for the job and always sharp. Can't beat that price either. I just looked it up on their website and found the exact one I'm talking about. Looks like it was a little more than what I said... but still a great knife. Here it is: http://www.buckknives.com/index.cfm?event=product.detail&productID=2910
     

  3. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    I don't think that link is working, go to that buck knives website and go to hunting knives/fixed blade/ diamond back guide. The one I have does not have the gut hook on it, I don't like using gut hooks but it looks like they have a model just like it for a couple extra $ with a gut hook if you like them.
     
  4. kyelkhunter3006

    kyelkhunter3006 New Member

    Messages:
    1,192
    State:
    Ky
    The ABSOLUTE best dollar for dollar knives you can buy are the Swedish Frosts and KJ Erikson brands of knives. They are generally under $15, most run around $10. They are tough rugged knives made out of either Swedish high carbon or Swedish stainless steel, both are VERY good steel. They take a hair popping edge, hold it well, and are easy to sharpen. You really can't hurt the knives, and if you do manage to, you're only out $10.:wink::cool2: I've got about 10 of them stashed in various places, along with the one I carry as my everyday outdoor knife.

    Another very fine knife is anything made by Kershaw. Great steels, great standards, great designs. The Ken Onion fixed blade knife is very fine, especially for under $40.

    To be honest, I think that almost all of the knives that Buck makes today are junk. They're made out of a cheap grade of stainless steel, marketed with a bunch of gimmicky "designs" to make a sharper edge. :roll_eyes: Same goes with Gerber. They both SUCK equally in my book. Years ago, both companies used 440C steel, a very fine cutlery steel. Buck eventually changed everything to 425HC (a decent steel) and then to 420J2 (same steel the cheapest of cheap are made of). Gerber went from 440C to 440 B and then 440A, made a few models of 425HC and now they make them with 440A and 420J2.

    Both companies have ruined proven designs by outsourcing them to Chinese factories, using a lower grade of steel, and lower quality control standards. :angry:

    I do give credit where credit is due... Buck's and Gerber's premium knives are made of high grade steels to much higher standards. You can tell which knives I'm talking about, because you will PAY for them.

    Cold Steel still makes a very sharp knife, but again, most of their everyday models are made in China now. I've had several of them in the past, and I can tell a difference in the Japanese produced knives and the Chinese produced knives.

    Other brands that I like and WILL recommend are Ka-Bar, Becker, RAT, Outdoor Edge, and Ontario.
     
  5. plainsman

    plainsman New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,187
    State:
    minnesota
    I bought a Wyoming knife for skinning / gutting for about 4 bucks. Its cheap, sharpens easy, and opens em up easy. I use a saw for cutting the pelvis. I got that at Cabelas for a few bucks, its small and I can easily cut thru anything. This ain't manly equipment but it works and don't weigh much.
     
  6. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    I use a Kershaw now for gutting. I used to use a gerber gator. I still have the gator but the kershaw fits in the pocket better. The kershaws and gerbers will run you anywhere from 20 to 50 or 60 dollars at wallyworld. I use my butchering knives for skinning and processing anymore.
     
  7. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i own several- ontario, kershaw, schrade, case, moore maker, kabar, cold steel, etc. the one knife i didn't expect to be good at all was my buck diamondback. you'll hear bashing on these knives, but this one has butchered and skinned literally over a ton of animals. i snapped the tip off so i could round it off. i use it to sever joints, split sternums and pelvises, skin and quarter. i also use it to shear ribs off the spine. it's plenty tough enough to do the job. i hunt year round for exotics and nongame, so this thing gets used more than just during deer season. i do all the rest of my processing witha rapala fillet knife. i also like that i could get it in my natural gear camo. without the tip modification i had no use for this knife- i don't like the sloppy butchering job a straight point does, not to mention the sticking through the hide while skinning. for me anyway! with the exception, in my opinion, of a schrade sharpfinger, you can't beat a round nosed skinner. it's really all opinion till you find what YOU like.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009