Hunting in the snow......

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by flathead willie, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Hunting in the snow should be illegal! It's just too easy. (Just kidding!) After the 16 inches we got here last week end, I finally got to go out yesterday. I wanted to drive up to my friends farm to do some late season scouting. My alarm failed to go off at 4AM so I was late getting up. I decided to wait awhile and just hunt the afternoon. I got out there about 1pm for an afternoon of muzzle loading.

    I parked at the barn where calf stalls are and headed out along the fence beside the feed lot, a 10 acre patch of woods where Gary drops the round bales. I could immediately see that the deer had been coming along that fence line and feeding with the cows at night. I continued across the pasture and into the woods on the mountain. The wind was coming down the mountain so I thought I'd just stalk a zig zag path to the top, cross over to the left side of the property on the trail at the top, and come back down the far fence line to the blind I left there during gun season.

    I hadn't made it 50 yards into the woods when I saw a set of day old Bear tracks and a pile of dirt where he had dug under an old log. While I was checking that out, I saw a group of 8 Turkeys coming towards me down the mountain. The closest one was a long beard, (turned out to be an 11" beard). He got to about 30 yards from me when I pulled the trigger. The Powerbelt bullet put him down instantly.

    I picked up my Turkey and continued up the side of the mountain. Before long I crossed a fresh set of deer tracks that came down the mountain and turned right on an old logging road that I was walking on. I walked another 20 yards and saw two does a short way ahead of me. I thought about taking a shot but the choose to let them go and see what else was out there. After another 100 yards, I ran into another group of 10-12 Turkeys.

    I got to the top, crossed the flat at the top and started down the the far side. Right above where I have a natural blind set up, I ran into 6 more deer, one a small 8 pointer. I watched them as they wandered over the property line to the neighbors property. When I was sure they were gone, I continued down to the blind and sat on the big flat rock next to the blowdown where I've taken several other deer. From there I could see across a big deep hollow with a spring in the bottom. As I scanned up the far side of the hollow I caught movement. I looked through the binoculars and saw 3 more deer, 2 small bucks and a big doe, 200 yards away working their way up the hollow. I steadied my Ruger 77/50 on a sapling and centered the cross hairs on the does shoulder. At the shot I saw her run over a ridge and disappear with one of the bucks on her trail. It was a long hike from where I was, especially carrying a heavy Turkey. I had to go down the ridge I was on, cross the bottom of the hollow and climb up the other side. By the time I got to where I thought the deer had crossed I was pretty winded. I walked toward a dry log that looked like a good seat. When I got there, I saw blood all over the snow. I knew I had made a good shot. There was a blood trail a blind man could follow. 50 yards down the trail there was a big fat doe piled up in the rocks.

    Using my haul rope, I tied the Turkey to the deer and dragged them both straight down the mountain towards the API blind I had planned on hunting until dark. When I got there, I found that the snow had caved in the blind and broken some of the fiber glass rods that hold it up. I also realized that the wind was wrong for that blind anyway. The deer had been coming in behind the blind on a couple trails that were just down wind of the blind, through the planted pines. I figured I'd cross back across the lower side of the mountain and see what was coming to the feed lot. I was a little ways inside the pines above an overgrown field, dragging my game parallel to the field. As I stopped to take a break, I saw 4 more deer 1/4 mile away, feeding in another field where there were patches of grass where the snow had melted. I watched them for a few minutes and started my drag again. I went another 50 yards when I saw 3 more deer coming through the pines toward the field. One of them saw me as I dropped the deer and took my rifle off my back. She started back up the mountain but stopped to look back. That was her last mistake. I looked at my watch. I had been there for 4 hours and had seen 18 deer and killed 2 Deer and a Gobbler. I gave the deer to the land owner, but I'll post pictures of the Turkey later.

    Yea, this snow hunting is just too easy. Deer stand out like Mr. "T" in a herd of Angles.
     
  2. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    How things have changed. When I was a boy, we were lucky to see a deer every few years. Seeing 18 in an afternoon is a long way from what we had 40 years ago. Congratulations.:big_smile::big_smile: I hope to go a few more times this week. I have one more tag to fill and a herd of folks begging me for venison.
     

  3. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Congrats Billie and giving the landowner the meat is not only a good investment, it's a friendly gesture also. More hunters should follow the same practice. Our muzzle loader season is still in till tuesday but i'm gonna get ole caroline off the wall and go bowhuntin this evening. Looked at my stand yesterday evenin and the ridge is full of tracks. Hopefully i'll see more than just snow.:wink:
     
  4. THE PAN MAN

    THE PAN MAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,213
    State:
    hartsburg mo.
    u could write a book. that was interesting. heck of a day for just doing a afternoon hunt! guess it paid off to sleep in a bit.:big_smile:
     
  5. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Sounds like a heck of a hunt ,Billie. Congrats on your success.:cool2:
     
  6. Pennspin

    Pennspin New Member

    Messages:
    64
    State:
    Alexander City Al.
    That's what I call a great hunt!:big_smile:
     
  7. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Lets see if I can get these Turkey pics posted.

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  8. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I just weighed the turkey on my fish scales. It weighs 18.5 pounds. Not too bad!
     
  9. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    Congratulations on the turkey.
    I didn't get one this fall. Seen bunches,,,,,,running away!:smile2::smile2:
     
  10. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    For some reason this property always seems to be full of gobblers. I saw at least 2 dozen yesterday. A few years ago I sat in the stand and watched three big flocks walk by. Finally it was time to leave and along came another flock. I picked out what looked to be the biggest and shot it with a round ball. It weighed 23#.
     
  11. BubbaCat

    BubbaCat New Member

    Messages:
    5,868
    State:
    Arizona
    :crazy:looks like murder to me ! lol :big_smile: makes up for thanksgiving !:big_smile: congrats
     
  12. cantstopgrandma

    cantstopgrandma New Member

    Messages:
    955
    State:
    MD
    I got lucky getting to my stand late during our opening day of shotgun season this year. I was walking to my stand as legal shooting time happened. Just so happened a doe run out of the thicket i was walking beside and stopped in the field 40 yds from me.....its was pretty nice killing a deer before ever getting in the stand. Its amazing how what we consider a misfortune (getting up late) can turn into good fortune.