Hunting Grackles

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by TX Fisherman, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    Grackles are a real pain in the but where i live, they might not look that bad in small numbers, but in big numbers, they leave a huge mess, they leave droppings on everything! does anyone know if its legal to shoot grackles in collin county?
     
  2. Lngbo

    Lngbo New Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Marion Ark
    What is it? I have never heard of them.
     

  3. DryHole

    DryHole New Member

    Messages:
    56
    State:
    Katy Texas
    Black Birds....

    There used to be a bounty on them back in the days..
    Something like 2 cents a bird..I have heard storys of pickup beds full of birds..
    This is a clip from Texas Parks and Wildlife home page..


    The Common Grackle, a "refined crow" (which is really no crow at all except in appearance) has scarcely more friends than a thief is entitled to; for, although in many sections of the country it has given up its old habit of stealing Indian corn and substituted ravages upon the grasshoppers instead, it still indulges a crow-like instinct for pillaging nests and eating young birds.
    Traveling in immense flocks of its own kind, a gregarious bird of the first order, the grackle nevertheless is not the social fellow that its cousin, the red-winged blackbird, is. It especially holds aloof from mankind, and mankind reciprocates its suspicion.
    The tallest, densest evergreens are not too remote for the Common Grackle to build its home, according to Dr. Abbott, though in other States than New Jersey, where he observed them, an old orchard often contains dozens of nests. One peculiarity of the grackles is that their eggs vary so much in coloring and markings that different sets examined in the same groups of trees are often wholly unlike.
    The average groundwork, however, is soiled blue or greenish, waved, streaked, or clouded with brown. These are laid in a nest made of miscellaneous sticks and grasses, rather carefully constructed, and lined with mud. Another peculiarity is the bird's method of steering itself by its tail when it wishes to turn its direction or alight.
    Peering at you from the top of a dark pine tree with its staring yellow eye, the grackle is certainly uncanny. There, very early in the spring, you may hear its cracked and wheezy whistle, for, being aware that however much it may look like a crow it belongs to another family, it makes a ridiculous attempt to sing. When a number of grackles lift up their voices at once, some one has aptly likened the result to a "good wheel-barrow chorus!" The grackle's mate alone appreciates his efforts as, standing on tiptoe, with half-spread wings and tail, he pours forth his craven soul to her through a disjointed larynx.
    With all their faults, and they are numerous, let it be recorded of both crows and grackles are as devoted lovers as turtle-doves.
    The Bronzed Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula aeneus) differs from the common grackle chiefly by the more brownish bronze tint of its plumage and its lack of iridescent bars. The bronzed grackle's range is more westerly, and in the southwest it is particularly common; but as a summer resident it finds its way to New England in large numbers. The call-note is louder and more metallic than the common grackle's call. In nearly all respects the habits of these two birds are identical.
     
  4. SNAGGED

    SNAGGED New Member

    Messages:
    89
    State:
    Tahlequah Oklahoma
    I think they are considered song birds and some states dont allow shooting them. Might check to be sure.
     
  5. Big Eli

    Big Eli New Member

    Messages:
    185
    State:
    Ohio, Clifton
    Here in Ohio in the late summer & fall we get large flocks of them that come and go. I assume there are migrating?!?!?

    Most folks hate em for the droppins and noise. I don't mind em they make for great wing shooting warm-ups for the upcomming season!!!!

    I had an old lady niebor when I live in town that hated them with a passion. See had a pair of speical wood planks that she would sit with on her front porch and bang them together to scare them off. Back then in town I just shot bottle rockets at em when they landed in the trees.
     
  6. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    yes i found it, and i can hunt pigeons too!
    • The only birds not protected by any state or federal law are European starlings, English sparrows, feral rock doves (common pigeon - Columba livia) and Eurasian collared-doves; these species may be killed at any time, their nests or eggs destroyed, and their feathers may be possessed.
    • Yellow-headed, red-winged, rusty, or Brewer's blackbirds and all grackles, cowbirds (does not include cattle egret), crows, or magpies may be controlled without a federal or state depredation permit when found committing or about to commit depredations on ornamental or shade trees, agricultural crops, livestock, or wildlife, or when concentrated in numbers and in a manner that constitutes a health hazard or other nuisance. (this was from the texas parks and wildlife website)
     
  7. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Ok, but why do you want to kill them? Are you the offended party? Are the birds like do-doing on your parade? At one point in my life, I was a blood thirsty little fiend. Now I have gotten so old I hate to kill a field mouse in my kitchen. I will do it, but hate doing it. LOL
     
  8. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    actually they make a huge mess in my yard and on our cars, and im really tired of cleaning my parents cars covered with bird droppings!!!
     
  9. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    aw shucks, you are right about the pigeons. i really shouldnt kill them, i try and eat everything i kill, but i have no reason to kill the pigeons.
     
  10. Sparky Larson

    Sparky Larson New Member

    Messages:
    539
    State:
    Marlette Michigan
    Here in Michigan, we hunt pigeons all the time. We usually start about the 15th of Aug. to sharpen our shotgun skills for the up and coming small game season. Needless to say, we eat what we shoot. They make excellent table fare, if cooked properly.
    Cleaning is easy! Just bust the wings, stick your thumb under the breast and rip it out. Peal the skin and feathers off, and your done in less than a minute.
    It's that simple. Try it some time. You might find yourself a new sport, and some fine eating.
    Sparky
     
  11. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    I got a reason to kill them for you. Every year starling and grackles alone are responsible for millions of dollars lost, in crop harvest(per state). Sure shooting a dozen out of 1000 wont help much, but you have nothing to lose. If anything it can help your accuracy and hunting skills. SHOOT EM!:cool2: good luck