Hunt Scrapes vs Food Plots

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by randallewis, Aug 31, 2007.

  1. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    Scrape hunting is my favorite. You are trying to pattern this particular buck before he patterns you. I plant food plots and put out corn to keep the does around. But on scrape hunting you know its a buck. If I'm lucky I've caught him somewhere on a trail camera. I don't climb much anymore but I use ladders and ground blinds. In north La. 1st peak scraping starts around 2nd week in Oct. 1st rut starts about 2nd week in Nov. My favorite time of year.
     
  2. Grumper

    Grumper New Member

    Messages:
    2,277
    State:
    Crystal City MO
    I hunt in northern Missouri, and Southern Iowa, from mid september to mid january, and for me, it isn't the issue of hunting one or the other. I just hunt where I think deer in general are gonna be at. Seems that most of my digital photography work and video, has bucks visiting scrapes right around midnight usually, here in Missouri, so I don't really hunt over scrapes, too much. Basically every year besides this year, being my lease was up on my farm, deer hunting has been a 365 day per year hobby. I would spend all year scouting, and kind of taking an inventory of deer on my farm, so I knew what was there, and got to pattern their activity. Here's pretty much a rundown of my hunting habits.
    1. Early season. (Mid Sept. to Mid October). Depending on whether or not the farm I'm hunting has alot of timber determines the situation. Deer are usally gonna eat acorns over regular forage this time of year. But if no acorns, I will generally try to hang my stand in a transition area between a watering hole and a food plot. I love to hunt over Biologic fields this time of year. The biologic products, even soybeans, have protein which will help antler development. Deer are usually super easy to pattern this time of year.

    2.Pre-rut and Rut. (Mid October to late November) This time of year, I will actually try to get in the deer's bedroom. I will hunt usually high, deep in the timber in the morning, trying to catch them bucks cruising for does, and hunt destination feed fields, Usually where there is a funnel, in the evening time.

    3. Post rut, and Late Season (Early December-On) This time of year, I will concentrate heavy on food plots. Usually beans, standing corn, ect. Something that will get the deer's belly full when the thermometer bottoms out. There are alot of times when you can pay your farmer to leave a few rows of beans standing, or leave an acre or two in the back standing. You'd be surprised how many deer this will draw when it gets cold.
     

  3. kkyyoottee

    kkyyoottee New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Iowa
    Randall my ol friend scrape hunting is like going to horse races you just never know. Scrapes are where bucks make tracks at all hours day and night . I have put trail cams out and the bucks doing the scraping and checking did so after dark!!! Id do the food plots but Id set 400 yards in cause they aint coming to those plots till after dark!!! Good luck my friend!!!
     
  4. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    In north La., thats where the scrape lines are; 200 to 300 yds from the food plots. Usually crossing the trails to the food plot. All kinds of deer check these scrapes. Does spikes and whatever
     
  5. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    i never done much good hunting over scrapes myself but i have seem my dad take several nice bucks hunting scrapes over the years but the key to them here is muzzleloader week. thats the time the bucks are starting to search for the first doe coming into heat. once things break loose and rut is full swing ....well scape hunting is over with for the most part. here anyways. so what im trying to say is you only got a small window of time to hunt them effectively but it can be great if you find the right scrape. me....put me in a funnel somewhere and i will wait him out....got to come sooner or later.:wink:
     
  6. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    I only stay w/ the scrapes until rut. Generally the acorn crop comes on about the second week in Nov. If you don't have access to hardwood you do a lot of bird watching on the food plots. Its that way until the acorns are gone or soured. I guess everyone has a theory.
     
  7. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    randal i understand your theroy but to explain mine a little more to you. look at a good funnel....all kinds of funnels out there but a road crossing is a great funnel in some areas. i like this one best because a lot of places if you look a deer wont cross a road just anywhere....they going to have a go to spot most of the time to avoid the neighborhoods dogs barking, school bus stops, and all kinds of distractions. so what i like to do is look at the road to start with and think to myself now where would a deer cross this road at? most of the time there is only 2-3 places that they will cross. then talk to the local folks and they will tell where they see them at. now keep in mind i havent went into the woods and left no scent for deer to smell me at all. so i havent altered any deer movement by leaving human scent. then i slip into the area i have picked out but dont go any father then i have too and setup and use the wind to my favor on which spot to hunt. no need to go looking for scrapes and rubs because i already know that is the land i hunt. it would be just leaving human scent in the woods to alter the deers movement in my area. big bucks down like it. we all know what a deer does when it smells human scent in the woods when season is in. to me this is the most over looked hunting there is and it can produce big bucks....trust me. also a interstate with a fence along side of it can work great to funnel deer to you also. they tend to travel the fence line and occasionally cross the interstate. keep in mind you need to stay a safe distance from the hwy and remember you cannot hear nothing but trucks.....lol. just look up an there he is. so no sleeping in the stand!:smile2: might add this theroy works all season too or until the local herd goes noctural.
     
  8. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Ive tried hunting scrapes but I cant always find them. I like funnels like where a couple hollers come together and it forms a flat lowland area. Another favorite of mine is hunting water sources. Seen the bigger bucks in some pretty small creeks and the edge of a pond can be good for does.
     
  9. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
    I have done better huntin scrapes the last 2 weeks of the season, when the last few does are commin into heat, and most of the guys I hunt with are at home watchin tv. The biggest buck I ever saw was in a bad rain storm, he was workin a scrape, he was to my right, and I couldn't get turned around on him for a shot. He just slids away, I never saw him again. I was the only one in our camp to brave the rain that day. I don;t know why a lot of peopel stay out of the woods when it's rainnin. I've kill a lot of deer in the rain.
     
  10. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    I have found my best results are from hunting bedding areas instead of food plots. The thicker, the better! Around here, the bucks are out of the food plots long before first shooting light and don't return until it is too dark to shoot. They will be in and around bedding areas all day long.
     
  11. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I try to hunt between the beds and the food, but for the life of me, I can't figure out where the beds are.

    Hint hint, Willie. Teach me.
     
  12. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    The beds are easy to find. Take a walk in the woods about 10:00am - 2:00pm, and remember where the deer jumped from. You will be in, or near, a bedding area. Whatever piece of land I'm hunting, I look for the thickest, most hard to sneak into place I can find and I hunt there. I like the down wind side of large thickets. When I find a real good thicket, I go in at mid day, making all the noise I can, and cut a small trail into the center. I prepare the trail and stand area early in the summer and by Fall, deer are usually using the trail I cut to get into and out of the thicket. Before I hunt it, I tie thread across several trails and check them to see where the deer enter and leave from. Trail timers are a big help. Then I get in a good stand 2 hours before the sun comes up and wait!! Almost all my shots are 25 yards or less because I tend to hunt such thick places.
     
  13. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    Willie you need to come down to Louisiana and check out a 3 yr. old 200 acre pine plantation. You want thick stuff. You cant see your feet its so thick. Saw briar's so big they will dull a chain saw. You can't put up a tree stand. There are no trees. This is where they bed up. We will get them come dog season.
     
  14. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
    Thanks to I.P. we now have a 800 acre pine thicket, problem is you can't hunt in it, it's just that thick. I.P. said don't even think about cuttin any trees for shootin lanes, so we have to hunt the edges. There is no tellin what is beded up in there. I have kill some nice bucks there over the last 3 years, so I tink this year will be even better.
     
  15. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    We have very little of IP but I think they are the seating nipple of the timber co. when it comes to leases. We have mostly Weyerhaeuser. They will allow you to maintain any existing roads and a fire lane around it. The big problem now is they come in with doziers and plows and windrow up rows and plant. You cant get across them hardly. If you have a stand w/ a shooting lane in the cutover you have lost it for as bush hogging.
     
  16. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
    One thing you can do after the tember has been cut, try to catch who ever is replantin your lease, it my cost you a little cash, but you can ask who ever to leave you some shootin lanes. I did this, and the guys did a good job, and I only had to $75. Some of the best money I ever spent.
     
  17. kkyyoottee

    kkyyoottee New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Iowa
    I used to also think the thickect nastiest areas were where the deer would hide also. But after thinking about it and then checking it out after a snow I have come to this conclusion. Deer are lazy like most hunters. If it has a decent rack it cant walk in there any better than we can. We also have a standing rule leave the bedding areas alone the deer will always head back if they think its safe if not they will find a new one and new routes to food and water, course this is just my view and experience.
     
  18. jeffw51

    jeffw51 New Member

    Messages:
    288
    State:
    mo
    scrape hunting can be deadly,but only when they first appear in early prerut.after that they lose their effectiveness and bucks will check them at night or check them downwind and move on.also smaller younger bucks dont make scrapes they may dig in another bucks scrape or mock like they are scraping but most big scrapes are made by bucks 2.5 or older.add big rubs to the equation and your chances are even better.like i said once does start becoming hot and the rut is truly on srapes and rub hunting is generally not effective.
     
  19. David Knotts

    David Knotts New Member

    Messages:
    2,569
    State:
    Bossier City, La
    You need to come hunt in Louisiana, if you want to kill a good buck, you need to hunt the thickest nasiest stuff you can find around here. Well till the does come into heat. Then none of the rules work.
     
  20. dust777man

    dust777man New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    SC
    My best results have come from funnels and food plots. Have never had much success hunting around scrapes.