How would you cook this?

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by Cuda-Cada, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Cuda-Cada

    Cuda-Cada Member

    Messages:
    748
    State:
    Jacksonville, Fl.
    Got a shoulder from a wild hog from a friend of mine. Never fixed this before. Thought about just throwing some onion soup mix on top of it with some veggies and aluminum foil and throw it in the oven. Any other recipes that might work even better?
    Thanks...
     
  2. ateamfisherman

    ateamfisherman New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Texas
    put in a pan put some flower in it and brown it. put roast in and cookslow and long . Then put taters and onionin and cook till done. Season to your taste. thanks Sam Davis
     

  3. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i would grill the whole shoulder in an aluminum foil pan. i cook mine with peach wood and charcoal, on indirect heat. takes about four hours or so depending on the thickness of the shoulder. i season it with grill mates pork rub, always comes out real good. then the shoulder blade goes to the dogs.
    another thing we do with the shoulder is debone it while raw, then put it in a wok on the kitchen stove. i still season it with the rub, but cut up serrano chile peppers and mix it in with the meat. cover it with water and cook it on med- med high till the water evaporates. makes a killer burrito with a kick. i got some spices from duck commander and they make a killer rub that goes well on pork too, if you can get it.
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    All good ideas; I'll post some recipes for some other possibilities.
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Green Chile Pork

    Ingredients:

    * 1 medium pork roast
    * 2 cans (4 ounces each) mild green chile peppers, chopped
    * 2 cans (14.5 ounces each) diced tomatoes
    * 1 cup chopped onion
    * 1/2 - 1 small can (4 oz) hot jalapenos, diced(optional)
    * salt and pepper, to taste

    Preparation:
    Cover roast with water in slow cooker/Crock Pot and simmer overnight or approximately 8 hours. Let cool. Take meat off bone and separate into smaller pieces. Add meat, tomatoes, chiles and diced onions to the broth. Add about 2 teaspoons salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Let simmer another 8 hours. Thicken with flour and water.
    Let set overnight in refrigerator. Serve the next day alone, with tortillas or over burritos.
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Pork Chile

    Ingredients:

    * 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    * 1 1/2 pounds boneless lean pork shoulder, cut in small cubes
    * 1 clove garlic, minced
    * 1 small onion, chopped
    * salt and pepper, to taste
    * 1 can (15 ounces) pinto beans or small red beans, drained and rinsed
    * 1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes
    * 1 can (4 ounces) chopped green chile peppers, drained
    * 1 teaspoon ground cumin
    * cornbread or tortillas
    * sour cream or shredded cheese, optional
    * fresh or purchased salsa, optional

    Preparation:
    In a large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add pork, onions and garlic. Cook, stirring, until pork is browned; add salt and pepper. Add beans, tomatoes, chile peppers, and cumin. Simmer over low heat for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with cornbread or tortillas and sour cream.
    Serves 6.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Pork Stew with Cornmeal Dumplings

    A delicious pork stew with homemade cornmeal dumplings. Pork stew is cooked in the crockpot then finished with drop dumplings.
    Ingredients:

    * 1 pound boneless pork shoulder roast, cut into 1-inch cubes
    * 1 clove garlic, minced
    * 1 tbsp. cooking oil
    * 3 medium carrots, cut into 1/2 inch pieces, about 1 1/2 cups
    * 3 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed, 2 to 2 1/2 cups
    * 1 (12 oz.) can (1 1/2 c.) beer
    * 1/4 c. quick-cooking tapioca
    * 2 teaspoons sugar
    * 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
    * 2 small bay leaves
    * 1 teaspoon dried leaf thyme, crushed
    * 1/2 teaspoon salt
    * 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    * 1/4 teaspoon pepper
    * 1 large can (28 oz.) tomatoes, cut up
    * Cornmeal Dumplings, recipe below

    Preparation:
    In a large skillet over medium heat, brown pork and garlic in hot oil. Drain off excess fat. Meanwhile, combine all ingredients, except dumplings, in a 3 1/2 to 4-quart slow cooker. Stir in browned pork cubes. Cover and cook on LOW setting for 9 to 10 hours or on HIGH setting for 4 to 5 hours. If stew was cooked on low heat setting, turn HIGH heat setting for the dumplings.

    Prepare Cornmeal Dumplings, using recipe below. Remove bay leaves and stir stew. Drop dumplings by tablespoonful onto hot stew. Cover and cook on high for 50 minutes more (do not lift cover). Sprinkle dumplings with cheese before serving.
    from Betty Copeland

    Cornmeal Dumplings
    # 1/2 cup cornmeal
    # 1/2 cup flour
    # 1 teaspoon baking powder
    # 1/4 teaspoon salt
    # 2 1/2 tablespoons cold butter
    # 1/2 cup milk
    Combine cornmeal, flour, baking powder, and salt; cut in butter with pastry blender or a fork until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add milk and stir. Drop onto hot stew and continue cooking as directed.
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Crockpot Pork Chili

    This pork chili is made with tomatoes, chili beans, pork, chile peppers, and other seasonings.
    Ingredients:

    * 2 to 2 1/2 pounds pork loin or lean pork shoulder, cut in 1-inch cubes
    * 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    * 1 large can (28 oz) diced tomatoes in juice
    * 1 can (16 oz) chili beans, undrained
    * 1 can (8 oz) tomato sauce
    * 1/2 cup salsa
    * 1/2 cup chopped onion
    * 1 small bell pepper, chopped
    * 1 tablespoon chili powder
    * minced jalapeno or other hot chile, to taste (optional)
    * 1 clove garlic, minced
    * salt and pepper to taste
    * 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

    Preparation:
    In a large skillet, brown pork cubes in hot oil over medium heat. Drain. Place pork in crockpot; add remaining ingredients. Cover and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.
    Serves 8 to 10.
    Good with cornbread or crackers.
     
  9. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    That sounds good to me...on the grill ..indirect heat....pork rub!!!!! YUM-YUM
     
  10. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I came up and remember when all stock ran loose on open range.

    A loose running or "wild" as some call hogs taste like what they have been eating.This is why they were caught,neutered,wormed and "fed out" before butchering.Any hog that was inadvertently killed was "tested with a "Try piece".Cut a small piece of lean and fat off of the hog and drop it in a fire or in a fry pan if home.Smell it cooking.If it smells OK cook it.If it smells bad,throw it away or cook it outside for the dogs.

    We did not have "Store bought"dog food back then."Bad Hogs"were often smoked for dog food in a SEPARATE smokehouse.Put it with your good meat would ruin the good.Believe me when I say folks tried every way to cook it to no available.The only time it was found eatable was when NOTHING else was available and it was eat it or starve.A hog eats a rotting cow,it will taste as such for a while!

    There are many things that hogs and cows will eat that will make their flesh and MILK taste bad.

    You want the best tasting pork or beef.you pen it up and feed it CORN.Peanuts also give it a great taste but the fat is very soft.The "bland tasteless meat of today fed with the soy and blended feed does not have the taste of the old meat.We did not have to flavor and season it for a great taste.

    If you have GOOD pork,all you need is heat to cook it.The taste will be there.Your best chance of getting this will be the free ranging hog.It will also be your best chance of getting FOUL tasting meat and a hard to remove stench from your home.Some areas have excellent feed in the woods.Some do not.

    We do not have Wild Hogs in the USA.We have domestic hogs roaming loose and are no more wild than dogs or house cats with out owners.They are a invasive species.They can be dangerous and killed folk in the catching days

    Folks also fed their hogs Strychnine to kill the hog thieves that ate their hogs.This means that a hog can live on and eat things that will poison and sicken you if you eat the flesh.This was another reason people flushed out their hogs.Many plants that hogs feed on are poison.

    Handle your pork with care and do not contaminate your kitchen.Wild hogs have and carry many diseases that you or your family can get through careless handling.Cooking will kill them.

    The meat can be far greater than what you can buy.It can also be a random disaster if you do not go about it properly.

    I love a good piece.I can not even describe a BAD piece!the above is the way the old folk taught me to avoid the pitfalls and enjoy a piece of Hog meat!

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee ps.All of those bones and bony pieces goes good with Collard or Turnip greens!
     
  11. Luke Clayton

    Luke Clayton New Member

    Messages:
    831
    State:
    Texas
    ALL THESE SOUND GREAT! How about punching holes in the meat, inserting slivers of garlic and jalapeno. Season with your favorite dry seasoning, douce with BBQ sauce and put on your smoker in a double layer of heavy duty foil. Smoke with your favorite wood for 3 hours, then wrap tightly and keep the temp at 200 to 250 degrees for at least 6 hours. I use a SMOKIN TEX electric smoker and set it at 200 and often cook these big pieces 15 hours. GOOD EATIN! Got a hog hunting article coming out probably later today here on the BOC.. and at www.catfishradio.com GOOD HUNTING! Luke Clayton
     
  12. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    thats about on the money right there, any tough cut of meat you want low n slow....a good sear doesn't hurt either. J-trews recipes would work good too....
     
  13. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I agree, Having lived and hunted in Florida for the better part of 30 years there are some hogs that do not taste right. If they were living in an area with fresh greens and water you are good to go if they were living off of scrub pine, palms and drinking form a still water swamp they can be rough.
    We would take all of them and prep them like this.
    We bought an old tub and had it in a shed on a friends property. Clean the hog and skin it removing most of the fat right under the skin as soon as possible. When we got it cleaned (or home if cleaned in the field) we put it in the tub and put in 5-8 gallons of buttermilk we got at a dairy, enough water to cover and Ice. We kept it iced down like this for at least 2 days and have went 4. The tub was wrapped in Styrofoam sheets and pieces and would hold Ice for 4 days easy in a shed in Florida summer heat.
    We would poke as many small holes as possible in it if we were doing a whole hog roast or section it and put the pieces in.
    Then take them out rinse them, wrap them and freeze them. When we would cook them we would thaw them in a butter milk/water mix then season and cook. The game taste was all but gone. We would even do the ribs (Not a lot of people cook them) of hogs and deer the same way. Thaw in Buttermilk/water. BUT put them in a pan where you can COMPLETELY cover them in water and put them in the oven on about 250. After the oils/fats stop comming out take out the pan and allow it to cool. The oils/fats will solidify on top and you can remove it from the pan and dispose of it. Take the ribs out and cook them on the grill!!!
     
  14. DoubleG

    DoubleG New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    Kentucky
    Can't go wrong making BBQ. I like it smoked w/hickory wood. If you don't have a smoker, indirect on the grille like posted earlier works fine. If there is not much fat on it you may want to baste fairly often. My personal favorite is a 50/50 mix of apple juice and Jack Daniels. If smoking or doing indirect just remember that if your looking you ain't cooking. Loose alot of heat everytime the lid is opened..
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Peewee's right. I can still remember back when I was a kid, drinking milk from cows that had been eating wild onions. Ever drink milk that tasted like wild onions? Ugh!
     
  16. 1mickymoo

    1mickymoo New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Edgerton, Kansas
    I would brine it for at least 24 hours, ie. water, molassess, salt and spices. then, smoke it.
     
  17. hunted

    hunted New Member

    Messages:
    1,943
    State:
    washington court house,oh
    you guys are making me hungry
     
  18. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I find me some good Buttermilk,I am going to drink it and cook all kind of good things with it.That hog will just have to find something else to soak in!

    I am a crippled up old shut in,but I can find a hog quicker than I can good Buttermilk!

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee.
     
  19. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Man alive!You got me laughing so hard the pain is horrible.They ain't made enough Morphine to help me right now!I would rather drink a quart of green Persimmon juice than a 8 ounce glass of that milk.

    As for any of you city folk who want to know how it taste,I can't think of anything to compare it to.

    Unless you folks have tasted it,you have no idea what a horrible taste we are talking about.Even worse and not funny,you had no milk and no butter to eat or cook with until it got out of the cows system.

    The only way to get rid of them out of a pasture was to dig each and every one out roots and all.I heard that it only took one tiny piece of one to do the job.

    Now I liked to eat them and flavor a stew on the river or in the woods.

    You get a faint strange weird bad taste in your store bought milk,it is a very good chance of being this.I have had a Dairy owner in the late 60's tell me that they got complaints certain times of the year.With modern selective chemical weed killers and modern Dairy feeding practices,it is most likely a thing of the past.

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I know what you mean about finding good buttermilk. I haven't been able to find any since I was up in Montana and could get real buttermilk from the Hutterites.