How To Turkey Hunt

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunting' started by koking20, May 22, 2009.

  1. koking20

    koking20 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    State:
    north carolina
    Hey guys while this year was my first time turkey hunting and I loved it did not get a bird because I only got to go twice but anyway I am trying to get any helpful advice I went with my father we are both amatuers lol we walked for miles trying to locate turkeys with a crow call and an owl call only resulting in one gobbler which we spooked lol just wondering what kind of tactics do you all use while locating turkeys and also while trying to call them in any help would be appreciated guys
     
  2. Wabash River Bear

    Wabash River Bear New Member

    Messages:
    3,019
    State:
    Indiana
    The technique you described above is what we here call the "Run & Gun". We dont normally use it until the later days of the season when the birds have already bred and the hens no longer play into the scheme of things as a lure or distraction. It can be successful if you can locate a lonely desperate Tom late in the season, but you have to be very careful, very stealthy. The idea is to locate the bird, sneak in reasonably close, set up (set a lone hen decoy and move back into cover) and try to coax him to come the rest of the way to you. Use gentle quiet calling, far and few between calls. Remember, if you can see him, he has probably already seen you, game over. If you try to chase him to get a shot, more than likely you are gonna get busted and wore out.
    Early season is your best opportunity. The key is "do your pre season homework". Find a flock of birds gathered in your hunting area, watch them dailey from a distance (daybreak and sunset). Find out where they roost. Which direction they fly down in the morning. What direction they travel to meet or search for hens. Where the hens are usually located. This is called patterning, and it is key to a successful hunt and may take several days.
    Once you think you have them patterned, get a lay of the land looking for a good place to set up on the Toms. You will be looking for good cover (tree line, field edges, brush piles, ect) with a clear shot (20 to 40 yds) to the birds kill zone. It will need to be reasonably close to their flydown area, but not too close. You will want it to be between their roost and the hens, if they get to the hens before you get to them, your screwed.
    Ok, now you think you have a plan, and the season is open. Get set up before dawn, put out a couple hen decoys (make them look natural), and get into your hide and get comfortable. As the sky just starts to lighten, start out with some gentle calling, yelps, clucks and purr's. Dont call too much, too loud, or too often. Listen for the Toms to gobble in return, and listen for them to fly down so you get a direction on them. Be patient, resist the need to call, a little goes a long way. You just want to call enough to keep them interested and coming to your decoys. Be still and be quiet. Turkeys have unbelievable eyesight. When they move into your setup, you should have already predicted the direction they are coming from, at first glimps of a bird slowly get your gun up and on him or them. Dont call, the decoys will do the coaxing now. Follow them with your gunsite into range in your kill zone (turkeys are slow and deliberate, it may take a while, be strong and steady). If you can see him, he can damn well see you, dont call, just be ready. When he is in range, and the sites are on his head, pull the trigger! Be ready for a follow up shot if needed. If he's down, get up and on him, stand on his head till he quits flopping. Congrats, successful hunt. :wink:
    Now with this basic info, and I'm sure lots more info to come, be prepared to throw it all out the window. :smile2: Turkeys are unpredictable, and will throw you for a loop when you least expect it. I hope this tactic will help you get on your first bird, but be prepared to roll with the changes and think on your feet. Good luck.
     

  3. Wabash River Bear

    Wabash River Bear New Member

    Messages:
    3,019
    State:
    Indiana
    I left out one of the key factors. Learn to call. Learn to use a diaphram mouth call and a friction call. Learn the different calls and what they mean to a turkey. It's a language, and you are trying to communicate to the birds. You dont want to be signaling danger when you are trying to coax a big ole Tom into your setup. There are several different calling CD's on the market that teach you to call and what it means.
     
  4. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Cant add to that,Good job ,Barry. One other thing,dont get too hung up on sounding "perfect" every bird in the woods has their own unique sound,just remember that you are just another voice to them.