How to Put backing on your reels

Discussion in 'Fishing Line Review' started by pabloracer4748, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    Ok I have a question regarding using backing on a reel with superlines like power pro and spiderwire. I do have some problems on baitcasters when I crank the drag way up with the line burrying into itself and getting stuck. What I dont understand is how spooling mono under the power pro will help this. How would this stop it from digging in? Also would there be any other benefits to backing your reels?
     
  2. Widemouth

    Widemouth New Member

    Messages:
    57
    State:
    Arizona
    The problem with tying your coated braided line directly to your spool, is that the whole wind will slip. Somethimes the outer layer of the wind will slip at a different rate than the inner layer which causes the line to foul. It will stick, burry itself, and forms little loops. Putting down a backing of mono will cause the whole wind to move together uniformly. Its best to tie the braided line to the mono with a Double Uni knot or a blood knot.
     

  3. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    I put electrical tape on my reels. Then once the knot is tied i will pull the tape over the line alittle so there is no way it can slip. Good luck
     
  4. CatHunterSteve

    CatHunterSteve New Member

    Messages:
    456
    State:
    Snowville, Va
    Paul, from my experance with braid to limit the occurance of the line digging into tiself, maintaining a good tension on your line when reeling it in will help more than anything. It is important with braid to have a tight wind on the spool to prevent the line digging into itself. Keep the line between your thumb and forefinger when reeling in and initially when loading your reel some guys wear a leather glove and put a lot of tension on the line when initially spooling the reel.
    Backing on the spool is used to prevent braid from slipping on the spool itself when relling the line in under a load. Braid it very slick, or at least PP is and braid will slip on some spools if you don't put a mono backking (about 2--3 layers of mono on the spool) or a layer of tape (I use paper tape) covering the spool prior to loading it with braid. The tape or mono will keep the braid from slipping on the spool under a load.

    one way to check if that is happening is to mark the edge of your line and the eadg of the top odge of your spool, try reeling in your line under a load and if the to lines that your marked do not remained lined up with each other, the spool is turning but your line is not.
    Hope this helps!
     
  5. bigkane

    bigkane New Member

    Messages:
    279
    State:
    Ashland, K
    I've been wondering this same thing myself, great question.
     
  6. bedbug jr

    bedbug jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,084
    State:
    Missouri
    I agree with the above methods of backing your braid and I use mono with double uni knot for tying the two together. Jeff of Team Catfish made a post a coupla days ago about using a heavy weight and letting all your braid out to wet it then reeling it back on the reel before use. Tried it in river current from my boat and it greatly reduced the tendency to pull down in and makes for good uniform spooling. Stay safe and good luck!!!
     
  7. Cuda

    Cuda Active Member

    Messages:
    553
    State:
    Iowa
    Name:
    Mike
    I use black tape to cover the bottom of the spool with 2 or 3 wraps then tie the line on. I have yet to have the line slip on any of my reels. You could add more if you needed to to get the spool filled with line.
     
  8. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    Cool but what would be the benefit of having the spool completely filled with line as opposed just say half full. And im not talking about adding more line really, just adding backing under the line to help fill up the spool. would it lessen stress on the drag or something. Hopefully you can understand my question.
     
  9. catfishinsc

    catfishinsc New Member

    Messages:
    507
    State:
    SC
    I was getting ready to post that another benefit of backing was to take up space on the spool so you can fill the spool with less braid (unless you want the entire thing full of braid). It's not going to affect the drag, other than your adjustment should be a little looser because it takes more force to pull drag with 1/2 spool than a full spool at the same adjustment. Think of it as a lever, with the spool only 1/2 full the lever is shorter, making it harder to pull. What it may help with is casting, because a full spool releases more line per turn than one only 1/2 full. However, if you're prone to backlash with the spool full it may not help.
     
  10. Rich.Carpenter

    Rich.Carpenter New Member

    Messages:
    135
    State:
    Indiana
    Having just become familiar with baitcasters, my thinking is that with a full spool, as you said, more line comes off the spool each turn. Now that doesn't mean the line is coming out much (if any) faster - after all that 2oz sinker and baited hook are going to fly just as fast either way - but it does mean that the spool isn't spinning as fast when that bait hits the water. Therefore, the chances of a backlash are reduced.

    I find that when night fishing, all I have to go on is the whine of the line coming off the spool and the splash of the bait hitting the water to maintain spool dicipline and avoid nasty birds nests. Getting the bait out there without spinning the spool any faster than necessary helps a *lot*.
     
  11. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    WoW that is some great info guys. Everything I wanted to know about backing and then some. Thank you so much!!!!!!!!!:big_smile:
     
  12. catfishinsc

    catfishinsc New Member

    Messages:
    507
    State:
    SC
    Basically my point is that there is a maximum speed of a spool when casting based on bearings, bushings, lubrication, etc. If the spool is full, then more line coming out per turn at max speed means more distance. Plus the spool is going to decelerate at the same speed and without any other forces applied will spin for the same amount of time. Putting out line faster the whole time gives you longer casting distance.

    Of course this is all in theory. If you cast your rig the same speed either way without getting to the maximum speed of the spool it doesn't matter. And if you backlash too much it probably doesn't matter then either.