how to make soap bait

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by redcat, Nov 17, 2005.

  1. redcat

    redcat New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Cordesville, SC
    Any info on how to make soap bait out there? I'm willing to try to make it my self. I heard of just using Ivory soap, but I was hoping to find something I could do with it or something else.
     
  2. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Redcat, I have not used soap bait but what I have read just use the ivory as is. Like I said I am no expert but I think Jtrew has used soap bait on several occasions. send him a PM he will answer you.
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    You can put Ivory soap into an old pot over low heat and melt it. There are probably an almost unlimited number of things you can do to it:
    1. Adding water will result in it being softer. A little water simply makes it soft enough so that you don't have to be so concerned about it crumbling when you cut it into pieces. More water, and you have a semi-soft soap that can be formed into balls on treble hooks like a doughbait or work it into a piece of loofa.
    2. Add bacon grease. There's a strong school of thought that the animal fats/oils used to make cheaper soaps is what attracts cats, so adding more animal fats/oils should make it more attractive. I've got some made up where I added about 1/2 cup of bacon grease for each bar of Ivory, but I haven't given it a real test yet.
    3. I've also heard of adding garlic, anise, and/or blood to soap. It's cheap enough so that if you melt down several bars, you can separate it into a number of smaller batches, with different additives for each batch. Then test each batch to see what works best for you.
     
  4. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Soap Bait Recip
    The basic recipe is:

    10 cups (5lbs.) lard or tallow

    10 cups (5lbs.) cold water

    ½ cup borax

    ½ cup plain household ammonia

    1 can of lye (12 ounces)

    This will make 11 pounds of soap or about 700 baits.

    The lard and/or tallow must be all animal fat, no vegetable shortening. Bacon grease is fine but you have to watch out for shortening or cooking oil mixed with it. I find pure, unused lard is easiest to obtain and use. The beef tallow will be in a solid form and must be rendered into a liquid before using. I use 3 pounds of lard and 2 pounds of tallow. The proportions are flexible, but the higher the ration of tallow to lard, the harder the soap will be. You don’t want the soap too hard.

    A sort of rubbery consistency is best and the 3 lard to 2 tallow seems to be best for me. The mixture should be just barely liquid at 90 to 100 degrees F. Warming in the summer sun is just right but in winter some additional heating is needed. Mix the ammonia and borax into the fat mixture.

    When you pour the lye into the cold water it will get hot, maybe up as high as 170 degree F. This solution is powerfully caustic, don’t splash or let any get on you or your clothes. Always us a glass ceramic or heavy plastic mixing vessel, never metal. Add the lye to the water slowly and stir constantly with a wooden spoon or paddle.

    The lye solution will have to cool down to approx. the temperature – maybe a little cooler – of the melted fat. This can be done either by simply waiting or by substituting ice for a measured quantity of water so that the total of ice and water doesn’t exceed 10 cups.

    When the proper temperatures have been reached, slowly pour the lye water into the fat mixture stirring constantly and steadily but slowly. Rapid stirring or agitation may cause the lye water and fat to separate as the soap hardens.

    When the nascent soap becomes thick enough to hold, the stirring paddle is a fixed position, pour it into a container lined with waxed paper. The cardboard base of a 24-can cold drink carton is excellent for this purpose. In a day or two the soap can be removed from the container and cut into bars. It is ready for use immediately but the texture is improved with a few days of curing.

    Anise oil is a deservedly popular scent. A quarter-ounce will cost about a dollar and is enough to give its distinctive aroma to a batch of bait. Sold on sour grain? Substitute sour grain water for the plain water in the basic recipe. You will be able to smell it as long as the soap will last.

    Catfish love peanut oil; never suspecting that oil from the same bottle may be used to deep-fry them. A quarter cup won’t harm the texture of the soap, but it sure will make it smell like peanuts. If you like liquid commercial fish formulas use any amount from quarter ounce to four ounces depending upon its strength to impart its odor to your soap.

    Cottonseed meal is a proven catfish attractant. A cupful will provide not only its unique odor – not unlike that emanating from a busy bakery—but also will increase the volume of the batch. It may be hard to find. The cottonseed meal fertilizer stocked in nursery isn’t the same thing, since it has numerous chemicals added to make it a better plant food. Many feed and farm supply stores carry cottonseed cake, which isn’t a cake at all, but cylindrical pellets. However, it is pure cottonseed meal when cursed and may be substituted with no qualms. So call range cubes look like cottonseed cakes, but contain no cottonseed products.

    Pete
     
  5. redcat

    redcat New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Cordesville, SC
    where do I finf anise at??
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    You can usually find it in the spices section of a large supermarket; or a more concentrated (and more expensive) version at a pharmacy.
     
  7. Mathersm

    Mathersm New Member

    Messages:
    230
    State:
    Darbydale, Ohio
    Most bait stores carry anise oil.
     
  8. Coloman

    Coloman New Member

    Messages:
    441
    State:
    Soddy Daisy, Tn
    You can also get the "seed" in the spice area in the grociery store. I crush it with a rolling pin or grind it in a coffe grinder. Then I add it to veg. oil.