How to fish Rocky bottoms?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Ravensmavsfan, Dec 25, 2005.

  1. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    Does anybody have any techniques of avoiding snags when fishing a rocky bottom?

    For me the hook rarely gets caught, its the weights that get caught underneath rocks.
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    you can try snagless sinkers but theyre not foolproof. if your river fishing from a boat keep a few of those big clip on red/white baseball bobbers with you. if you get snagged up clip that bobber on your line and feed out line till the line from the bobber to the sinker is tight then jerk like hell with your rod close to the water, couple of times if necessary, this should dislodge a stuck sinker most of the time.
     

  3. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Reel down towards your snag until the line is taunt. Release enough line that you can raise your rod 3/4 of the way up until the line is tight and the tip is slightly bent. Lower your rod, and with your left hand pull down what slack line you have. Jerk up the rod with your right...and quickly release the line you're holding with your left. If done properly...the line will slap up against the rod when you release it. This sometimes works to dislodge your hung up sinker. Another thing I do is to release enough line to create some slack. Then when your line is slack...pull back several times like you're setting the hook. Sometimes the different angle you're pulling at the snag with the slack line...along with any current that exists will be enough to pull it loose. I fish a rocky river myself...I try to use as little as I can, or no weight at all if I can get away with it.
     
  4. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    For this situation I use a three-way rig........
    As you statated the weight is what hangs you up. Well to remedy this I use a three-way swivle to create a sacrificial weight rig.
    1. your main line (what ever size you use) is tied to the swivle.
    2. your leader is tied to the swivle (I use a leader that exceeds my main line test weight) example:With a 20# Main line, I use a leader that is 40# or 50#
    3.your drop line (or weight leader) is tied to the swivle. For this I use a line that has a smaller test weight than my main line, so when it gets snagged I will at least get my hook back. This will also help if you are snagged when a fish hits your line. A plus in my book.

    Here is a diagram of this rig:
     
  5. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    Great post man, always great to see members helping out other members. A++ for your efforts.
     
  6. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    There is another option that I use.
    The three-way slip rig! It allows you the use of a slip rig without the problems of loosing everything in the rocks.
    There are some differences between this one and the three-way rig.
    You use 2 barrel swivles instead of 1 three-way swivle.
    1. Thread your main line through the first swivle and then tie on the second one this wil allow the main line to slip through the first one.
    2. Tie your drop line(or weight leader) to the first swivle.
    3. Tie your leader two the second one.

    It should look something like this:
     
  7. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    Here is a variation of JW's rig, This works great if you dont have a lighter mono availble. Use whatever is availible then use a split shot below the sinker to hold it on. Works the same way, not any better or worse, just another option.
     
  8. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    If your fishing from a boat. I let out aobut 30 yards of slack line. Then act like your setting the hook. Most of the time it will pull it out of the rocks.
    But most of the time now I just use around 8 lb test line to tie the sinker on with. That way you break it off easy.

    Pete
     
  9. james

    james New Member

    Messages:
    747
    State:
    Blue Ridge texa
    one thing that really works for me in areas that have alot of rocks to hang my weights on is to take heavey duty copper wire cut the rubber coating off it cut it to lenght so it will weight how much you want to use take a pair of needle nose pliars and turn one end back around so now you have a closed loop on one end and just your tie to the loop and when it lands on the rocks it rarely will get stuck if it does it will uselly just pull out without breaking off
     
  10. Cattoo

    Cattoo New Member

    Messages:
    603
    State:
    caneyville,ky.
    hey j.w. i use that three way rig exclusively when i am fishing the rocks. most of the time i want my sinker to hang because the current is so strong. i pour my own weights so if i lose them, its not a great loss. the only thing i do differently on my rig is i put a 2-3 inch peg float about an inch from my hook. this does 2 things. first it makes sure your bait does not get caught under stuff so the fish can get to it and it also allows your hook to float to the top if you have to break your sinker off. i rarely ever lose my rig. if i do it is usually on other peoples line and i have yet to figure out a way to remedy this problem. also the reason i like the 3-way slip rig is if your sinker does hang and you have a fish taking your bait you can still drop your rod tip and feed it a little line so you can get a better hook set on it.
     
  11. pendog66

    pendog66 New Member

    Messages:
    2,121
    State:
    Brookville OH
    if your fishing from the bank use a 3 way set up. Or you can try the snagless sinkers neither are fool proof but they might save you some tackle.
     
  12. Thomas P. Conley

    Thomas P. Conley New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    Copperas Cove,TX.
    You know the old adage if you ain't snagging and losing tackle you ain't fishing where the fish are. I've used a flat sinker with soft treble type wire molded into it so when you hang up you pull and the soft wire (copper wire) almost always straightens out and you get your gear back. You only need to re-do the wire and your ready again. This type of weight works well in rocky bottoms and the sinkers can be used dozens of times over. I make these myself every so often as needed.
     
  13. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    One of our favorite places to fish has unlimited snags, just below the dam. I've used 3-ways to let the dropper break off and loose the sinker. I cast my own, so it doesn't cost much. Problem is, some of the locals use 50 -100 lb mono,or 80-lb fireline, and when they snag and can't break it off, they cut it at the rod and let if trail out into the current, I've pulled up 50 yards of the stuff. Sometimes, theres a wad of this cr@p so big you can't get around it. You have to wait for a big flood to wash a bunch of tree trunks in and out draggin' the junk line out with em. That can be a long wait around here! I'd like to have some kind of attachment to my line that would slice thru the snagged lines. Even thought about working from both sides of the river, having two tow trucks pull a set of grappling hooks back and forth to clear the junk. Leave the snags, that's where the big cats (and walleye and smallmouth) are!
     
  14. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    I don't like the idea of leaving all of that lead in the river but i will try it anyways, thanks for all replies.
     
  15. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    How about this one.Instead of using a sinker use a big heavy nail,then when it goes between a the rocks give it a little jerk and it pops right out.So ive been told lol.Im not an expert on river fishing and when i do fish the river i stay hung up more then anyone but im going to give this a try myself.
     
  16. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    As far as I know, there are two ways to go about fishing a rocky bottom. One way is to use some type of 'snagless' sinker, which will reduce, but not eliminate hangups. The other way is to deliberately plan to hang up and break off the sinker when you get a hit or reel in to rebait. This generally involves attaching the sinker with a lighter line than you are using for your mainline/leader. Most often, I do this by having a couple of droppers on my leader, with the sinker attached below that with a lighter line. If I don't happen to have any lighter line to use for attaching the sinker, I will scrape the mono right above the sinker with a sharp knife blade to weaken the line so it will break at that point. If you're having to make long casts with a heavy sinker, and have a problem with the sinker breaking off during the cast, you can easily make a sacrificer rig. Take a regular 'J' hook and clip off the point just above the curved part of the bend, leaving an abbreviated 'J'. Tie the hook to whatever point on your mainline or leader where you want the sinker to hang while casting. Go ahead and attach your sinker with a very light line. Then, using very heavy mono, at least 50# test, attach a 4" piece to the sinker with a large loop on the end. When you get ready to cast, simply use the loop to hang the sinker on the cut-off hook; when the rig hits the water, the loop will come off the hook, leaving the sinker attached only by the light line. Incidentally, this is the method used by most guys fishing for flatheads below the powerhouse at Dardanelle Dam on the Arkansas River; bouncing the rig along the bottom is used there for blues.
     
  17. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    another thing you can do if your using the all lead bank sinkers as weight is to use a pair of wire cutters and snip through one side of eye just where it meets the main body of the sinker... that way if it get stuck you will not lose the rest of the rig...
     
  18. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Great job J.W. on the diagrams! We use the 3 way swivils for bottom fishing for ling cod in the ocean with a 1 or 2 pound weight on a lighter dropper, and a 20 inch leader, same as you! The second rig of a sliding 3way is really clever! I read a post you made before about it, but didnt get it! The diagram makes it real clear and I will try it out next trip! Actually alot of good info from every one! Good thread!
     
  19. Rockjumper

    Rockjumper New Member

    Messages:
    358
    State:
    Parker,Pennsylvania
    Dreadnaught, I use your first illustration all the time, your second illustration I really like and I am going to try it out. Thanks for sharing.