How to ask a land owner if you can hunt on their land

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by TX Fisherman, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    what is a nice way to ask a landowner if you can hunt, or trap on there land politly??
     
  2. Redd

    Redd New Member

    Messages:
    790
    State:
    Southeast Kansas
    Fly down the road stirring up as much dust as possible, then pull the e-brake as you slide into his driveway. Peel out as you continue and when you find a nice parking spot next to his brand new emaculant truck, turn the wheel abruptly and slide right in, throwing rocks all over it. Rev up your pickup until he comes outside, then kill it. Out of curteousy, walk to the end of your bed and pee right there, instead of in the front where he can see you. Then strut up to him like you just beat the devil, drink to drink... and try to act sober. Slap his dog when he comes to be petted (this is a very important step). Then ask him who gave him permission to farm your land, demanding a fifty fifty split. Give him a little time to come up with the money of course, though...as that's the right thing to do. Then tell him you're goin' huntin', and to take the day off. He'll appreciate that. Anyway, once in the woods, shoot everything you see. Take everything back to his house, and throw what you don't want in the ditch. Slap his dog one more time, just so he knows who's boss, and peel out once again on your way out.

    Hope this helps ya, bud. It's worked wonders for me, and I've only been arrested twice...pretty good, I think. Anyway, good luck askin'...no, TELLIN'...and happy shootin' :wink:!

    -Red
     

  3. punkin570

    punkin570 New Member

    Messages:
    2,015
    State:
    MS
    OMG Kevin...If you do like what Redd's tellin you, I'm personally gonna bring my peach tree limb over there and stripe you good. You KNOW better than all that. Good Grief!!! It's all a matter of respect. If you know the landowner or not, just do as you would want someone to do you if you were the landowner. Be respectable, polite and for goodness sakes, don't be pushy........Redd, man, you and I need to have a looooonnnnggg talk bout your tactics......that jsut aint rite. Good luck Kevin.
     
  4. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Any more if you are not blood related, and then that might be more problems than you wish for, you can't. I own 130 acres of the best deer and turkey ground around. Other than invited's, I don't let anybody hunt. That is going to end this year. Two years ago I had a slug go over my head at 10 yards. You want to hear an unusual sound? Try that lad. Last year my neighbor who has hunted with us for 18 years had a slug go through his coat from another hunter he had invited. That is going to end. period. period. period. I don't want to seem goofy here. I have hunted all my life and did it well. I know what you are going through. The liability in todays world, let alone the fact that some moron might kill somebody on my place ain't worth it. I start wearing my shoulder holstered 38 in the fall. The poachers, trespasser's, and road hunters drive me crazy. I haven't killed anybody yet but it has come close. Sheriff's dept., DNR, game wardens know how to get to my place from any direction. I really don't know what you can do. Gain somebodies trust I guess. That B.S. about chasing cows and helping him make fence to gain the right to hunt don't cut it anymore. You are sucking-up for a privilege you might not deserve. Sorry, don't stop at my place. John
     
  5. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    well i meant it more for trapping then hunting...
     
  6. DukeCat

    DukeCat New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    North Carolina
    I have a friend in michigan who hunts with his dad and they have a whole plan worked out. They drive around looking for bucks bedding down in farmers fields then they go to the house and ask saying " my son has never shot a deer and we saw one in your field can we just go out today and see if we can get him" it actually works suprizingly well. Im not so sure how it would work for trapping because that is more of a long term thing.
     
  7. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    HA HA HA HA HA DAS FUNNY, RIGHT DER...
     
  8. jedt

    jedt New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Cameron,Texas
    Good luck here in TX TXfisherman. Most of the time it won't happpen unless you know somebody and proly not even then. I live in the country and know most people here and do not get to go.

    There is a serious hog problem here but the landowners do not let anybody help cure that problem. In Texas you pretty much have to find a landowner willing to lease hunting trapping rights to their land.
     
  9. BAMA_CAT

    BAMA_CAT New Member

    Messages:
    474
    State:
    Boaz,ALABAMA
    Kevin, what part of TEXAS are you in!!! I have some high school friend in east TX that hog hunt and trap all the time!!! and a sister that lives in north tx that has some land I might be able to help you out buddy!!! You can post it here or PM me
     
  10. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    Kevin, the best way to get permission to hunt a farmer's land is to walk up to his door with a fishful of $100 bills.

    Sucks, huh? Welcome to the world we live in. I hate it to the core, but that's what it's come to. I still hunt a few places for free..... mainly because I won't pay to hunt anymore. When it comes to the point that I absolutely have to pay to hunt, then I just won't do it anymore.

    Besides that, you're in Texas. There are precious few places in texas that you can hunt for free. Their public land is nearly non-existant. Sorry amigo. Whenever you get a chance, thank a texas hunter for the situation he created.:embarassed:
     
  11. deerhunter4

    deerhunter4 New Member

    Messages:
    817
    State:
    Illinois
    You know being a land owner is a nice privilage and having the right to allow people on your land is your right...However if you want to gain respect from the surronding neighbors and other hunters...It is only my opinion that you need to give respect back...any respectful hunter would only go onto land with permission....

    I would have been ok with your first part but the last part is just not nessecary...When you say "The B.S. part of helping make fences and put cows away don't cut it any more"(how else is some one going to gain your trust)...
    I guess the most offensive part was the additude on the end...
    (Sorry Don't stop by my place."JOHN")......Wouldn't you rather some one stop by and you tell them NO with a reasonable understanding of why you are saying no.....
    Rather than to just show up on your land and hunt...which happens allot anyway...Being disrespectful to young hunters just promotes this and thier peers to be disrespectful to you and your property...

    Sir;
    I don't even Know you but I can say from experience if some one is coming to you out of respect and asking for permmision no sence in being disrespectful to them just tell them NO and give them your reasons...Not knowing for sure but I don't think John even had plans of coming to you and asking for permission...He was just trying to find the polite way to go about it...I can tell you for sure I would much rather a young man(John)approch me personally and ask for my permission than find him in my woods and have to tell him he is being arrested for tresspassing...That is when I feel you have all the right in the world to have all the attitude you want...
    Just asking for a bit of respect on the young hunters part trying to do the right thing as I have been there myself...I do own my own Land now and only allow select guest to hunt when I am hunting...

    Sorry for saying anything here I am going to apologize to everyone in advance...

    I can remember a certain man whom just lives up the road from me,I gave respect to by asking the same question...He didn't even allow me to finish my sentence said NO and slammed the door in my face...This really put a bur under my saddle so to speak...sorry for the metophor but trying to be nice with how this made me feel....

    I just hope you can understand Sir how this can make this young man feel when he is trying to do the right thing...
    Saying NO is ok just a small explaination goes a long way, No it is not necessary...
    Who knows maybe you might just make another friend by doing so or at the very least, you know you did try to explain to them why
    you felt so emphatically about saying NO upon thier being arrested for tresspassing charges when you catch them on your property with out your permission...
    Thank you for hearing me out...Again this is just my opinion

     
  12. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Ive found landowners are more receptive to trapping than they are hunting, no bullets flying around. Tell them what you have been trapping for and how long maybe take some pics with you and have some references of other places you've trapped. You may want to put an ad in some local papers, alot of people have problem raccoons and what not theyd love to have taken care of. Beavers can also cause some big problems. Good luck.
     
  13. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Paul: Txfisherman (Kev.) and I have worked things out over a couple of PM's. He's a nice lad and he's welcome on my place anytime, with some reservations, but he knows what they are.
    As regards to your reply to me. I frankly appreciate it. This is our first date and I promise to be gentle. Will even bring flowers and some chocolate. Let me give you a little history. My attitude now is pretty well described in a post I made that is in Becky's Storytelling entitled "I just don't do it anymore." If you have time take a look at it. I moved back to Iowa In 1985 and bought this broke-down mistreated farm. Barren pastures, overgrazed timber and no wildlife to speak of. I had to farm it for 3 years before I could put it in the 10 year Govt. program. Bought some sheep and called myself a farmer. For 4 years I had to fight to keep out lowlife trash who had no idea of what a fence or property line was. They never asked, just assumed it was theirs to hunt. We have two John Deere manufacturing facilities 40 miles North of me, and 40 miles South of me. These Union Boys don't have enough brains to zip their zipper without being told how to by their foremen or shop steward. They think their 40,000 plus dollar a year jobs entitles them to go out on the weekend and rape whatever they can afford the shells to shoot.
    I put the ground in the 10 year program. I restricted hunting to what I could control. This year the ground will be re-enrolled again. Thirty years without a plow. I'll be dead before this next ten years is up, but my wife knows what to do with the place after I'm dead. I and the neighbors bought pheasants and stocked them. I've restricted deer hunting to bucks only over 8 points. Kill as many does as your U-Haul can carry. When I moved in I picked up a bushel of traps I plucked off the bluffs and fence lines. I have the best set of bolt cutters to dismember road trappers snares you have ever seen. I had 100 pheasants in my windbreak this winter, with 300 mourning doves, turkeys are not countable. Red tailed hawk, coyotes, fox, coons, beaver, mink and weasel would make a trappers heart sing. I have let a man coon hunt over the years. He got 30 coon the first night last fall and I told him to quit.
    Your first paragraph to me said "being a land owner is a nice privilege." It's not a privilege Mr Paul. It is something I sweat my gonads to acquire and maintain. My responsibility is to maintain it in a manner that will make all of us appreciate what we have. If you were to pull into my place with Illinois plates and ask me to hunt, your picture would be taken, license plate written down and I would see your dust going down the road. If I were sitting next to you in a beer joint and you told me that your son was ready to kill his first deer, you and he would be invited out tomorrow. I saw a buck leafing out last night behind my windbreak. The largest bodied buck I have seen in 23 years. You and your boy are welcome to try your luck at him this fall. I'm gonna shoot a 3 year old doe, so you are welcome to him.
    This is a long post and I apologize. Most guys won't have the patience to read the first two lines. Your post to me was heartfelt and I understand where you are coming from. My reply is an attempt to describe why I feel the way I do. Never put on another man's shoes until you've first smelled his feet. John.
     
  14. deerhunter4

    deerhunter4 New Member

    Messages:
    817
    State:
    Illinois
    Thank You so much for the words...I appreciate where you are coming from as well...I misspoke on the privilage thing about owning your own property...I am sure you have spent allot of hard work on your place...Just got a little worked up is all cause of an old incident and misplaced probably more words than that...Please forgive...

    It sounds like you have a great thing going and you point is well understood...Just thankful you didn't take it the wrong way...as I just wanted anyone to know a few words goes along way in explaining why a land owner says NO...I just seen that door slam in my face when I read the post...again I apologize and thank you for your words...You seem like a hard working,heart felt man....I hope we can talk more...

    This BOC is by far the best place on the internet going today as any other place I would have posted my opinion it would have been meet with a fight I am sure...You guy's on here at BOC are World Class... Again please forgive for the poor choice of words in my first sentence...


    As far as your feet goes can I smell them after you get them washed or does it have to be after you've worked all day....:wink:
    Hope your smiling
    Anyway here is a picture of me and my sons fishing trip from this year...Hope you enjoy it
     

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  15. redticrunner

    redticrunner New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    Mississippi
     
  16. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    hey kevin, don't let all that get ya down bud! from my experience, landowners are more likely to let you trap than hunt anyway, for the risk of damage to livestock or equipment. for about every 50 times you ask, you might get to go out one time and hunt or trap.
    i used to work to hunt, as i cannot fork out the cash to lease land. got a family to worry about first. i used to buck and deliver hay, 350 bales at a time. i would load it on a trailer in the field, stack it on a flatbed semi, and deliver it 2 to 3 hours away, twice a day. i did it for nothing, except for the privilege of hunting deer in a pretty good spot. well, i worked last summer like a dog, and showed up for the deer season, and my 'buddy' said i wasn't going to be able to hunt there anymore. i had shot a 17 point whitetail and a 32 inch mule deer on this farm, and made the mistake of letting anyone know i had done it. folks came out of the woodwork after that, and i ended up working for free. it sucks, but that's the way it goes sometimes...
    there is public hunting in texas though, depending where you're at. there is a $40 annual hunting permit you can get at any license retailer. there are refuges that have been set aside for hog, deer, dove and waterfowl hunting and some of them are quite good. some of them are open year round for hogs, but they have restrictions, like you might have to use a bow. that's fun hunting though, and will sharpen you up for the deer season. i hunt the red and canadian river here in the panhandle, and manage to get one here and there. i am a better hunter because of that, and you will be too if you'll do the research and work to make it happen.
    good luck to you kevin, and good hunting!
     
  17. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,693
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    kevin you might take up bowhunting i have 2 young men that bowhunt my place.i only have 10 acres but theres lots of deer passing thru.1 of them took a 9 point with 13 inch spread and the other took a doe.believe it or not most people will treat you rite even if you dont get permission youll feel better asking.every one else is rite on not going without asking.
     
  18. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I got 80 acres you can hunt tomorrow if you are willing to pay the taxes on the farm.:big_smile:
    Thats all it takes sometimes.5,6, or 7 bucks an acre does the talking to alot of people who own small farms.
    Small farms dont make money but those property taxes keep rolling in depending on what state you live in.
    And the county I live if your farm lays out 3 years its automatically taxed as residential property. 3 times what the farm rate is.
    There are alot of widows and widowers living on these small farms just making ends meet.

    Run an ad in the classified section of the paper. Offer top dollar for acreage.

    I let people hunt in my backyard and even my front yard but I dont allow or want a shotgun being used to hunt deer within 2 counties of me. Bring the 30-06. High velocity loads are much safer then a 700 grain dum dum round out of a shotgun that barely moves fast enough to get out of its own way. Low velocity rounds ricochet like rubber bouncy balls.
     
  19. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    Red- HAHAHA man you are my hero.
     
  20. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    Kevin,

    Most landowners will be more than happy to let you hunt their land if you volunteer to help out on the land. The few times I have asked I have volunteer to do work around the farm for them, no matter what they wanted done. When first adressing show respect, most farmers seem to be cranky old guys, and be polite. Dress well, and asure them you will not do harm to their land or liter, ect. If they say no, dont flip em the bird or smack em, just say thanks anyways and leave. As long as you seem like a "good guy" and offer your help you should be alright. Oh yeah, if they oppose you hunting ask about pest control, with a pellet gun. At least see if you can shoot some rats. Helpful to them and fun for you. good luck