How Old Is Grandpa??

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by randallewis, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    [FONT=&quot]How old is Grandpa???

    Stay with this -- the answer is at the end. It will blow you away.

    One evening a grandson was talking to his grandfather about current events.
    The grandson asked his grandfather what he thought about the shootings at schools, the computer age, and just things in general.

    The Grandfather replied, "Well, let me think a minute, I was born before:

    ' television

    ' penicillin

    ' polio shots

    ' frozen foods

    ' Xerox

    ' contact lenses

    ' Frisbees and

    ' the pill

    There w ere no:

    ' credit cards

    ' laser beams or

    ' ball-point pens

    Man had not invented:

    ' pantyhose

    ' air conditioners

    ' dishwashers

    ' clothes dryers

    ' and the clothes were hung out to dry in the fresh air and

    ' man hadn't yet walked on the moon

    Your Grandmother and I got married first, . . and then lived together.

    Every family had a father and a mother.

    Until I was 25, I called every man older than me, "Sir".
    And after I turned 25, I still called every man older than me, "Sir"
    We were before gay-rights, computer- dating, dual careers, daycare centers, and group therapy.

    Our lives were governed by the Ten Commandments, good judgment, and common sense.

    We were taught to know the difference between right and wrong and to stand up and take responsibility for our actions.

    Serving your country was a privilege; living in this country was a bigger privilege.

    We thought fast food was what people ate during Lent.

    Having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with your cousins.

    Draft dodgers were people who closed their front doors when the evening breeze started.

    Time-sharing meant time the family spent together in the evenings and weekends-not purchasing condominiums.

    We never heard of FM radios, tape decks, CDs, electric typewriters, yogurt, or guys wearing earrings.

    We listened to the Big Bands, Jack Benny, and the President's speeches on our radios.

    And I don't ever remember any kid blowing his brains out listening to Tommy Dorsey.

    If you saw anything with 'Made in Japan ' on it, it was junk.

    The term 'making out' referred to how you did on your school exam.

    Pizza Hut, McDonald's, and instant coffee were unheard of.

    We had 5&10-cent stores where you could actually buy things for 5 and 10 cents.

    Ice-cream cones, phone calls, rides on a streetcar, and a Pepsi were all a nickel.

    And if you didn't want to splurge, you could spend your nickel on enough stamps to mail 1 letter and 2 postcards.

    You could buy a new Chevy Coupe for $600, . . but who could afford one?
    Too bad, because gas was 11 cents a gallon.

    In my day:

    ' "grass" was mowed,

    ' "coke" was a cold drink,

    ' "pot" was something your mother cooked in and

    ' "rock music" was your grandmother's lullaby.

    ' "Aids" were helpers in the Principal's office,

    ' "chip" meant a piece of wood,

    ' "hardware" was found in a hardware store and

    ' "software" wasn't even a word.

    And we were the last generation to actually believe that a lady needed a husband to have a baby. No wonder people call us "old and confused" and say there is a generation gap... and how old do you think I am?

    I bet you have this old man in mind...you are in for a shock!

    Read on to see -- pretty scary if you think about it and pretty sad at the same time.



























    This man would be only 59 years old!![/FONT]
     
  2. baitchunker

    baitchunker New Member

    Messages:
    1,689
    State:
    alabama
    your telling me this man was a teenager in the 1960's and he had never heard the phrase draft-dodger, or slang words for marijuana like grass and pot? yeah right. just kidding! lol! i have a lotta respect for the older generations of this country. i think they had more testicular fortitude.
     

  3. trippyclwn

    trippyclwn Member

    Messages:
    603
    State:
    Chattanooga, Tn
    Name:
    Tracey
    you can say that again a lot of kids these days gripe and moan but they have game systems,air conditioning,tv,internet,musical instruments (electrical) cell phones,and complain about being bored????? i played g.i. joes and transformers as a kid and was lucky we had the money for food and a small bit extra!
    now everytime we go somewhere the kids hafta have i-pods,mp3 players or a gameboy or they start argueing with each other over the least little bit of anything. it makes you look back and thank God at least we were happy with the little we had!:cool2:
     
  4. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Actually television is much older than 59 years... it's even older than me but I never saw one until I was 17 and that one belong to the USAF.:wink:
     
  5. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Great post Randal. I have a lil disappointment in my relationship with my son that the generation gap is so large, for such a small span of time. I'm 55, but have seen his look of disbelief when I told him when I was a boy, we didn't have plumbing in the house, and in the summer the bathtub was in the front yard..."ya might be a redneck if"; and kerosene lanterns were still everywhere case ya had natures call in the dark. I had him ask me what a "kitchen match" was once, when he was reading a book. I'm worry that we have had too much technology in too short a time span. And really sorry that so much of it is weapons.
    I can remember the happy "trips" to my grandparents on saturday nights to watch TV. And if you didn't care for one show on, you could change to a second channel for another. It was amazing! LOL, And the city was crowded; they had 2500 people living there!
     
  6. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    I can relate to that Boots. I'm pushing 70 and it didn't impress my grandkids when I told them that I was born in the country w/ no elec., indoor plumbing, farmhouse w/tin roof and no insulation. My mom cooked on a wood stove. But I made it past that. Got me an engineering degree and hit the oilfields.
     
  7. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Thanks Randal: I have seen that before. It should be seen by more people in the context you as you described it. Anybody younger has no way to relate to the story, it is just another old man's story But they can relate when you make it personal as you have. I am 62. I would not want to do that again. I, however, can never remember being so happy. I can relate to that, thanks John.
     
  8. baitchunker

    baitchunker New Member

    Messages:
    1,689
    State:
    alabama
    there is still one small group of Americans who can relate- in my opinion...

    poor country folks. i cant relate to the feelings of not knowing those things existed, but i can relate to not having all of the luxuries of modern society. thats why i work so hard. being poor sucks.
     
  9. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Speaking of indoor plumbing... my wife's folks still didn't have it when we married. It was a few years later I helped them put in a bathroom.
    We were pretty fancy at our 2 room house, we had running water with one faucet at the kitchen sink. Our water supply was 2 x 55 gal barrels about half way up the windmill tower. My mom cooked on a kerosene stove for there was no wood where I was raised. We got electricity when I was 14. That 60 watt bulb hanging on a cord from the ceiling was blinding! It was another year before my folks could afford a refrigerator.

    Randall, I didn't get a degree but I also went to the oil fields as soon as I got out of the service and that's where we made our home.
     
  10. micus

    micus New Member

    Messages:
    524
    State:
    Lake St. L
    Nostagia is fine but would you REALLY want to go back to:

    One heated room in the winter and someone had to get up first to start the fire.

    Undressing under the covers after the bed warmed up at night and having to drag your clothes back under the comforter to warm up before you put them on in the morning. Then go outside and run down the porch to the living room to the room with heat and electricity.

    Watching the snow blow up from under the floor boards which are cleaned with sandstone and water.

    One scoop of cracked corn for the shoats and one for the family.

    Having meat for supper depended on how good you were with your 22.

    Most people rode horses to town.

    Get up before dawn, light a lamp, walk until the sun starts to come up, hang the lamp in a tree, take the lamp down and relight it as you walk home from having worked in a sawmill at .10 an hour for 12 hours.

    You drink ground water from a well that is yellow that you pull up with a wooden bucket.

    If you don't can it during the warm months, it isn't there to eat until the end of the next growing season.

    During any given day during warm weather the house is full of wasps and dirt daubers and flies.

    And since I'm tired of typing I'll leave you with using catalog pages for toliet paper.:wink:
     
  11. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    I hear you Dayton. We were not actually poor. It was just that the nearest power pole was 3 1/2 miles from our home. At that time you just didn't call the power company and ask them to set a pole and hang a meter. They had to have so many dwellings down that road to run a line. Think about it. If you don't have electricity you don't need plumping. You need a well rope.

    I worked in Odessa one time for Texas Pacific.
     
  12. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    I hear ya bout not wanting to go back. If you are a kid & you know you're poor; you are. I didn't know till I went to school. It was the other kids who let you know, LOL.
    But there were "families" then. An the older folks hadn't forgot the depression. No one went hungry long as the crops came in good. There was a "summer" kitchen built just for canning, an all the womenfolk got together to can for the families....for days.
    I still laugh, thinking bout my great grandpa, any time the topic of fear of change comes up. For my great grandma's 70th birthday, he had indoor plumbing put in the big house. I was a boy, & caught him flushing the toilet, watching, an muttering.....he was scared of it a lil. Far as I know it was several months before he used it for a "sitdown". He kept going out to the privy. I never knew him to be scared of anything. He plowed with horses for years before he got the first tractor. An once he had the tractor and a good truck, he knew he'd made it; had it made. Simpler times. Simpler, kinder people.
     
  13. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    We got electricity when REA came to our neck of the plains.

    Odessa was our home for about 40 years. Guess you remember the petrochemical and refinery complex south of town. That was were I hung out for about 32 of those years. When we first went to the oil patch I worked on a electric wireline truck. I like the logging and perforating work but hated 24 hour call.
    What kind of work did you do in the oil patch?
     
  14. randallewis

    randallewis New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Louisiana --Shreveport
    I started in production and ended up in drilling. We didn't stay in Odessa but about a year. My wife didn't like it so one day I said pine trees or tumble weed and she started packing that night. We eventually ended up in N. La. where we are from. Retired from Elpaso Production. Lost 75% of my hearing to the oilfield. Thats my only regret
     
  15. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    .... then that was a part of the El Paso Natural Gas Co?

    The chemical complex at Odessa was started and operated by El Paso Natural Gas Products Co for 25 years until Burlington Northern Rail Road made the hostile take over on Christmas 1982. After BN took over the Gas company they decided right away they wanted no part in the petrochemical business and sold it to local management.

    My high frequency hearing is also gone from being around gas fired turbines, gas compressors and screaming gas flowing through control valves. I didn't start wearing hearing aids for a few years until after I retired but company insurance paid for them and will the rest of my life.

    Odessa's bare area didn't bother me, it wasn't much different from where I was raised up near Lubbock. At first it was a little hard on my wife since she was from AR but she knew Odessa was where my job was.