How much should a trotline's end weight weigh?

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by vetrock, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. vetrock

    vetrock New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    ar
    I have always tied my trotlines from structure to structure. I don't have that luxury where I want to set my next one.

    How much should the end weight weigh?
     
  2. Sunday Money

    Sunday Money New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    north carolina

    We rigged up some vertical trotlines that we ran one night in a little friendly tournament between a bunch of my buddies one night with one half of a mason brick. Our float was a 14 inch swimming pool noodle that was about 6 inches in diameter. We wanted just enough to keep it on the bottom because when you hook a fish you have to pull that weight up as well. Our trotlines did fine, besides the lack of fish biting them, but i dont believe our method of making them was the reason for no fish biting. Hope this helps.
     

  3. recordbreakin1

    recordbreakin1 New Member

    Messages:
    746
    State:
    texas
    I set the same kind of lines out in the lake I fish.There is not any spot realy to tie the other end up.I use a regular small brick that you would find on houses.What I do is find out how deep the water is where you are goin to place the line.Tie the line to whatever it is that you are going to tie to.Place the first brick so that it take the line strait down to the bottom,them run some line out.Tie a brick on about every 5 ft. and on at the very end.Remember that this will make your line set right on the bottom though.I
     
  4. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    You can get it ran out and tie a tail line on it and drop a concrete block. The weight needs to be heavy enuff the line don't just pull into a pile when ya run it. My dad uses tote sacks full of sand fishing the white river. If they sand under, ya only lose the tail line. make sure you tag your lines and pick them up when your finished please.
     
  5. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    For 3 generations we only used a brick. Or rocks about the same as a brick. And we use a 20 oz coke bottle at or near the bank. And then a brick. Then 1/4 of the hooks and then a half or a brick. Then a 1/4 of them again and a half of a brick. and the next 1/4 and a half of a brick. Then after the last 1/4 a whole one.
    We can put them out anywhere and not just where a log or something is . And this is from 1/2 mile below the Pickwick dam. To miles below and in current. And even if you have lots of fish, The lines stay there.
    Here is a jumper line that only had 24 hooks. So it has a half of a brick in the middle. and a whole one on each end.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v693/ShilohRed/fishing/img18.jpg
    And here is a side shot
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v693/ShilohRed/fishing/jumperline02.jpg
    Pete
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Check 'Trotlining 101' in our library for sketches of how to suspend a trotline a certain distance above the bottom, or a certain distance below the surface.
     
  7. Rtpcat

    Rtpcat New Member

    Messages:
    72
    State:
    Alabama
    There are guys here who know more than I know about it, but in our river 4 bricks wired together do decent at holding a line, if the tail line is as long as the river is deep, if I run them in my 16ft alum boat. If I use my 16 ft bass boat(heavier) the weight will slide when I run it and i have to reset it each time. A brake disk that weighs about the same or a bit more, hold better,the iron seems to set or sand in better. Car rims and such can be dang heavy to pull up but they do hold very well and take up losts of room in your boat.:smile2:
     
  8. vetrock

    vetrock New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    ar
    That's my concern. My boat is fairly heavy, so I am trying to avoid resetting the line.

    So what I have concluded is I need something that weighs about 15lbs to avoid much trouble.

    I am going to a scrap metal yard today. I have an old riding lawn mower that I am going to trade in for a few trotline end weights. Or at least that is my plan...
     
  9. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If you are anchoring a trotline on a sandy bottom, the best thing I've found is an old tire rim. Don't see why it wouldn't work just as well for a muddy bottom. Doesn't work as well on a rocky or hardpan bottom.
     
  10. catfishjon

    catfishjon New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    texas
    I use a cinder block with a tag line and plastic coke bottle to float on top so I can recover the cinder block. Most of the times my first set is shallow where I tie the line and slopes down to the bottom where the weight is located. I fish the line as tight as I can get it. If the fish are hitting at one depth, I will reset the line to accomidate them. Catfishjon
     
  11. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Old Window weights work great for that also. Or a RR Plate. The place that the spikes are driven down and holds the tracks down. If you live near a RR yard. I bet the scrap yard has lots of them
    Pete
     
  12. BigOBear

    BigOBear New Member

    Messages:
    463
    State:
    TX
    I've thought about putting them out like this down here when fishing a spot without enough structure to tie to. But when I read our regs about freshwater trotlines I wasn't sure if TX allowed it. In the definition it says: "A non-metallic main fishing line with more than five hooks attached and with each end attached to a fixture." Never was sure if a weight I could pick back up would be considered a "fixture". What do yall think? Any texans fish them like this? Next time I run into my game warden buddy I'll try to remember to ask him. They define a throw line as: "For use in FRESH WATER only. A fishing line with five or less hooks and with one end attached to a permanent fixture." Kinda describes my limblines but kind of describes the trotline with a weight holding one end down (minus a bunch of hooks).

    Also ran across something else I was doing wrong. I always tie the ends of my trot lines a little out of the water on the trees (weighted of course to keep them below the boats and props) so bass fishermen can see the two ends dipping down toward each other in hopes that they'll... well... not sure exactly what I'm hoping they will or won't do. Helps ensure I'll find them too if I'm on unfamiliar water. But ran across this snippet in our regs... "trot lines may not: ... or the main fishing line and attached hooks and stagings placed above the water's surface". Guess I better start tying them under the water and tying a jug/bouy or something to each end to mark them. Do yall make yours visible or keep them hidden?
     
  13. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I know nothing about texas regs. but anywhere i put a line out, it's as deep as i can reach under the water to tie it usually. My anchor is a net grab and if the water rises i use that to pull them up with.
     
  14. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Regardless of whether I mark a line or hide it, I always set it deep enough that a boat can go right over it without any danger of the prop hitting the line. Unfortunately, I've found that I can't be a nice guy and mark my lines so other fishermen can avoid them, because a marked line is an invitation to either harvest my fish or cut my line...or both. I tie my lines off as deep as I can reach below the surface.
     
  15. ole whiskers

    ole whiskers Guest

    We use a wheel. Get you some old house cable and a loop onto the wheel. Then attach the end of the trotline to the loop. From the last hook drop to the wheel ought to be about 20 ft. To start you tie about 6ft.of cotton line to a tree root below water line. Run your baot just slightly up stream. After running the line out hold on to the wheel to get the slack out then drop over. Go back and put hooks, bait and a small weight abought every 6th hook. When ready to stop fishing run line and take hooks and weights off. Pull wheel in and work your way back to root pulling the line back onto the wheel. untie from root, put weights and a cup with hooks on top of wheel. It is ready for the next time you ready to fill the freezer. Mark on outside of wheel how many hooks are on the line. We have lines that are over 15 years old. They are all together stacked up easy to see.
     
  16. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    This is what we always used on our lines when I was a kid. Tie off about a 18" piece of line on them and tie them on to the main line. This helps keep your main on up off the bottom.
     
  17. ladeerhunter

    ladeerhunter New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Louisiana
    I do lots of trotlining, and I use large tire wheel, like 15 in. etc.Tie in middle and it will hold in waves or current. I think it settles in mud.
     
  18. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    Welcome to the BOC! You will like it here. :cool2: