How fast do hooks rust out?

Discussion in 'LOCAL ILLINOIS TALK' started by JimF, Apr 1, 2006.

  1. JimF

    JimF New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    IL
    Well, I went fishing today at a pond that has very large flat head, I have caught some over 30#s and heard of some going over 60#s and maybe over 70#s. Today I hooked one of the big boys. It got wrapped around a log or something. I could not get it free. I walked all around the pond trying to pull it free( both ways), it would not come free. I waited 1/2 hr tried again, no luck. 1 hr latter tried again no luck. The fish was still hooked ( I could feel him shaking his head) when I had to break it off. I would hate to think that he will die because I could not free him. All I wanted was a picture of him. Now all I can picture is a beautiful, large flatie rotting on the bottom of the lake, with my hook in his mouth, tied to a log. What a same!!! How soon will the hook rust off? Will this fish die?
     
  2. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    Jim, From the size of fish you describe, unless you were using a hay hook he should be just fine. Don't worry ! Be happy, you met up with him and had a good fight!l lol :D
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Depends on the type of hook and what it's made out of. A while back, I tried switching the hooks on my jugs over to nickle plated kahle hooks; they rusted out over a single season. I switched back to bigeye trotline hooks, which last much longer, even though they aren't stainless steel. But jugs are in the water a day, then out for a while. When I was running trotlines, I found that a non-stainless bigeye trotline hook would start showing signs of rust within a month or six weeks, so I switched over to the stainless steel version. I seldom see any rust on one of them, ever. As far as 'regular' hooks go (J, kahle, or circle), a quick look will show that there's a great deal of variation in the thickness of various models of hooks. One may be slim, so you can stick it through a live baitfish without killing it; another may look like it's strong enough to use for a hook to pull a vehicle out of a ditch. That's going to have a great effect on how long it takes for a hook to rust out of a fish.
     
  4. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    hooks take forever to rust out, and i have never seen one disolved all the way. i beleive what happens is the skin around the hook dies and falls out thus removing the hook. who knows what happens. all i know is that i have only caught about a dozen fish in my life with hooks still in them and they seemed to be recent.
     
  5. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    I've caught a few fish with hooks in their throat and they still bit my bait. I just let them go, but they seem to be ok. One I caught the hook was just about rusted out, I think maybe they would pass it at some point.
     
  6. kspor

    kspor New Member

    Messages:
    716
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I have heard the rust out thing alot. Never seen any real proof. I hope it does. If I deep hook a fish it goes home with me. I figure a quick death sure beats a slow death of starvations or infection. I switched to circle hooks hoping to eliminate deep hooksets.
     
  7. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    Good idea, but I like to set the hook. I'm going to have to think about that one. It doesn't happen too often but then again once is to much.
     
  8. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
    Just an idea, Take a small container the next time you go fishing and fill it up with the water there, then take it home and put the kind of hook you use in it and see how long it takes to rot....
     
  9. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Don't forget about the acids of the fish itself. You are not, at least i've been told, waiting for the hook to rust from the water but from the digestive systems of the fish it self. As far as that old flattie staying there til he dies, I don't know, but would hope that without all the tension from your end, he will either pull free or get some slack in it and spit the hook.

    Don't show this thread to PETA or they'd have a field day!
     
  10. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    I agree, from what i've been told the fish's own body fluids will eat the hook up rather quickly.

    Eric
     
  11. catfishingRon

    catfishingRon New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    Earlville, IL
    This is what I read about this issue,

    A much higher percentage of fish that are hooked deeply survive when the hook is left in and the line cut compared to those where a deep hook is removed. In the few scientific studies where the fate of hooks that were left in fish released by anglers were tracked, it has been learned that hooks were eventually shed by the fish or surrounded by new tissue. One study found that rainbow trout shed hooks in about 40 days. The study of 200 hundred trout released without removal of hooks 66 percent survived, of the 200 where the hook was removed 11.5 percent survived.

    In a 1989 study of smallmouth bass, study mortality ranged between 32.5 and 47.3 percent (depending upon hook size) for hooks that were immediately removed, whereas mortality for hooks that were not removed was 4.2 percent. In the case of juvenile smallmouth bass, the study found that upon dissection, some hooks were lodged in internal organs but that new tissue surrounded the hooks. The study further noted that dissected hooks exhibited minimal corrosion after 20 days. You are wise to cut the line and leave the hook in, the fish will likely survive and be caught another day.
     
  12. explayer

    explayer New Member

    Messages:
    372
    State:
    Tucson AZ
    I have got a couple of fish with some hooks it Some time last I did catch a bass with buzz bait already in his mouth I caught him a spinner bait pulled both bait out and let him go the buzz bait was still good shape
     
  13. Rat

    Rat New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    Forrest Illinoi
    Someone who already has their bait tank set up and catches bluegills for baitfish on a rod and reel needs to do an experiment. Catch a gill, cut the line at the hook and leave the hook in and put it in the bait tank. Also take the same kind of hook and put it in a glass of water and see how long they take to rust to the point they would fall apart. I would think the one in the fish would rust first due to being in flesh. I don't think one fish hook rusting in a 50+ gallon tank with a filter system would hurt the other fish, but if someone decides to try this, might want to get some other opinions.
    I'm guessing here, but I'd say withing 7-10 days, the one in the fish would be to the point it was ready to fall out.
    Any takers?
    Rat
     
  14. bluecatnut

    bluecatnut New Member

    Messages:
    891
    State:
    freeburg illinois
    i think that question is like askin the owl how many licks does it take to get to the center of a tootsie pop :happ-big: :happ-big: :happ-big:
     
  15. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    There are too many variables. What's the hook made of... stainless steel? Fresh, brackish or salt water...Where in the fish is the hook... Think all of these varibles will make it hard to support anything other than leave the hook in if it's deep and your not a meat hunting.
     
  16. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
    OK, time to build a fish hook laboritory for some experiments! And after that we can build Frankinfish.:cool:
     
  17. catfishingRon

    catfishingRon New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    Earlville, IL
    I did get a hook in my arm a few years back. It only took the the doctor 10min to get it out and give me 2 stitches. :huh: Dint think that answers the question though.
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Actually, what we need here is one of those guvmint studies...you know, like the one about the sex habits of frogs. Catch catfish, cut the line, leaving the hook, put a tag on the fish, and put it back in the water. Now, this will take a lot of manpower, but I have an idea where I can find it, assuming Uncle Sam is willing to pony up the money.
    And this could be combined with my other idea for a grant! That one involves studying whether catfish spin more clockwise or more counterclockwise when caught.
     
  19. fat_fish55

    fat_fish55 New Member

    Messages:
    394
    State:
    illinois
    i dunno but im figuring it will be ok
    whenever i see ppl catching marlin and stuff on tv they always cut the line instead of removing hook