How Far Can I Go with My Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by H2O Mellon, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    I think it's a 5 gallon tank & a Mercury 9.9 HP. The boat is a Bass Tracker Pro Guide 14footer. Any ideas for Gas mileage, or how to figure it out?
     
  2. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Mellon I will find out how to figure the usage you are looking for but I know My 85 will use about 10 gal an hour at WOT.
    Now I have a 9.9 myself and push a 14 foot john with my Buddie in it and gear and I have traveled about 15 miles round trip with fuel to spare.
    That is one of the advantages of the little 9.9 it gets good fuel mileage with the proper set up. It also is a very strong little motor.
     

  3. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    H2O Fill your tank, keep track of the miles with a gps, refill tank to find out how much gas used. divide miles traveled by gallons of gas used and you will have MPG.
     
  4. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    :0a32: But I dont have a GPS!
     
  5. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    i have a 9.9 also but its on a 14 ft jon so it will probably get better mileage than yours, but on a full 3 gallon tank i can go around eastwood lake probably 4 times with 2 people in the boat. all depends on how much weight your pushin. if you plan on hittin the ohio i'd take along an extra tank and see how far the first gets ya. its about the only way your gonna find out.
     
  6. nosnag

    nosnag New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Florida
    Wind,weather,and current are all factors in your mileage.Safest thing to do is carry a 3 to 5 gallon spare gas can if you are going to run a large lake or river.First and last thing you should think of when boating is safety .I would no more leave my flotation behind than not carry spare gas when on a full day trip.Been out with a couple of friends with no reserve gas.Long walks or even taxi fares were the clunker on those trips.
    BILL
     
  7. truck

    truck New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    williamsburg ohio
    Brian when I had my 14fter with a 16hp on it,I could run around eastfork lake all day on a tank of gas.You will see after using it awhile ;)
     
  8. Okccatman

    Okccatman New Member

    Messages:
    323
    State:
    Norman,Ok
    Bryan...... if you have a bit of extra room on your boat I would consider buying another gas tank. I belive they are around $15 for the 6gal plastic ones. It beats the heck out of rowing to shore against the wind and the current of the channels. Trust me I have been there and done that, and it is no fun at all.
    David Frantz
     
  9. Nobody Special

    Nobody Special New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    TN
    If you have a plastic tank, you most likely have a reserve built into it. Look at the bottom of the tank. If there is a dam seperating one half from the other, (sort of a deep notch crossways on the outside of the bottom) then you have a reserve. When you run out of gas, you can tilt the tank and let the remaining gas (about a gallon) run over the dam and into the side where the pickup tube is. Then pump the bulb a few times and you're ready to go again.
     
  10. wpsatisfide

    wpsatisfide New Member

    Messages:
    305
    State:
    Pawleys Island, SC
    Id defintely recommend extra gas on board, even if its just a gallon or 2.
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I was always taught to figure outboard consumption at one gallon per hour per 10hp at wide open throttle or a little less. If you can run at 2/3 or 3/4 throttle, your mileage will go up noticeably. Lots of things go into mileage, though, such as boat size, weight, load, hull type, water smoothness, etc. I bought a 25hp Yamaha 4-stroke last January, and the mileage is unbelievable. I do a lot of jugfishing, and I have yet to use much more than half a 6-gallon tank in a day's fishing, where I am constantly running the boat. Nevertheless, I have a fear of running out of gas, so I got a 5-gallon plastic jerrycan to take along just in case. It takes up less space in the boat than a regular outboard gas can, but still, it does take up valuable floor space. If I ever run across a 12-gallon tank that I can afford, I'll buy it; they have basically the same footprint, but are twice as tall as a regular tank.
     
  12. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    A boat is unlike a car in that more things affect the mileage of a boat. For instance, if you are going against a strong current, or going against the wind, you will use more gas. I know people who have the mileage of their car figured out to where they can wait to fill up until they are litteraly on fumes. I wouldn't suggest that in a boat. Unlike when driving your car, and you have a gas station on every corner, you don't always have a gas station available on the lake. I've notice some marina's are no longer carrying gas due to the high costs right now.

    Best thing you could do, take more gas than you might need. We always keep 2 6gal cans in the boat with at least 1 6gal can back at camp.
     
  13. Pennsylvaniacatchaser

    Pennsylvaniacatchaser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,340
    State:
    Sarver, Pa
    My old boat was a 14 ft. V-haul with a 9.9 Mercury. I could go a long time on 5 gal. gas. I never done a mileage study but the best thing to do is get a second gas tank or at least a gas can to keep on board. There is nothing worse than being out in the middle of nowhere and hearin' that motor sputter. You can find a used gas tank at flea markets sometimes pretty cheap, toss on a new squeeze bulb and be good to go.
     
  14. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    ive got an extra 6 gallon if ya need to borrow it to try out your mileage, might even consider a trade.
     
  15. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Just curious, how far do you want to go? I have had a little 9.9 that will last all day, but usually at some point in the day I like to wet a line, so i suppose that is not accurate. I just came back from Florida and some guy told me of a fishin spot that was 10-12 miles up the intercoastal. I thought that ridiculously far until I remembered that this boat has a 225 on it. Took me about 15 minutes (lots of gas). Anyhow, just rambling here, just wondered what your plans were when you asked the question.
     
  16. lonegunman88240

    lonegunman88240 New Member

    Messages:
    61
    State:
    new mexico
    what i usually do, is use my trolling motor to navagate down river, and use my gas motor to get back up river
     
  17. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Get ready to laugh:

    We've had this boat since 2001, bought it brand new. We have NEVER ran a full tank of gas out of it. PERIOD, I dont mean a tank a day, a tank a month, etc.... not one time in any year have we ran a full tank. :eek: That will change this year. ;)
     
  18. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Shoot Mellon My boat is in the back yard put up for the winter and its got a full tank of gas!!!!!
     
  19. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I bought a new 9.9 Mercury in1969,1983,and 2004.Each came with a 3 gal.gas tank.The last 2,the dealer swaped me a 6 gal.for my 3 gal.Check your tank size.Is the river navigable around Dayton?If it is,there will be milage markers at places in the river.If not,look at a highway map,and find a road that parallels the river.Start with measured tank(take off cap and measure distance to gas),and run up and down the river along side this road,turning around at the same spot EVERY time.Count the trips.Keep a eye on your gas tank level.When it has gone down enough to satisfy you,stop at your starting point.Measure your tank.When you get to a gas pump,carefuly add gas to your tank,to you are up to the level that you finished your run with.(if needed).Now keep up with how much gas it takes to fill your tank up to your tank starting point.This is the amount of gas you burnt on your test.With your vehicle speedometer,check out the road distance of your test.With the milage and the amount of gas you used,you can figure out how far you can go.You need to keep the tank at the same angle(level is best)each time you measure.Also,I once used over 3 times as much gas comming back as I did going,due to wind,current,load and waves.peewee-williams