How do you cast a baitcaster fishing reel?

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by onlyone, Mar 7, 2006.

  1. onlyone

    onlyone New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    SE Kansas
    I have had a baitcaster reeel for about two years. No matter how heavy my weight is, size of my bait, force of the throw or whatever else, I always get a backlash. Why? Is there some way to avoid this frustration?
     
  2. etipriga

    etipriga New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    TX
    Since your starting out i would go for a 2 or 3 ounce weight. Are your applying pressure on the spool with your thumb after you cast??
     

  3. onlyone

    onlyone New Member

    Messages:
    142
    State:
    SE Kansas
    Ya I apply pressure, but that slows down the cast and I get maybe 20 yards out. How far is a reasonable expectation of distance I can cast?
     
  4. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Onlyone, you didn't say what kind of baitcaster that you are using for one. If it is one of the ABU's you can expect a minimum of 50 yards on every cast with a two or three ounce sinker. Most of the baitcasters on the market today have a centrifigul brake adjustment on the side. If this is adjusted properly for the weight you are casting you should be able to click the button and the weight drops with a slight resistance. Just a tip. Vern
     
  5. etipriga

    etipriga New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    TX
    When i started casting mine i had a lot of hangups. You just have to practice letting off a little more pressure each time. Once you find the spot where it slows it down just enough to where you dont get a hang up that should be as far as it will go. Then you can add more weight for a longer cast.
     
  6. Riverjake

    Riverjake New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Joplin MO
    Practice, practice, and practice some more. Many I have seen starting out with a baitcaster don't thumb the spool until the bait hits the water, BIG birdnest. Try thumbing the spool as your bait starts to fall from the arc of your cast not when it hits the water. You will find the right time to start applying thumb pressure according to what weight you are throwing, reel and line your are using with practice. Sometimes it takes a short time and sometimes it takes a little longer but the time will come and all at once you will find that your thumb has become "educated".

    Just another thing for you to try. Works for me, hope it helps you, stay with it, you will get there and then wonder why you used anything but a baitcaster.
     
  7. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    What brand baitcaster! There are some that are not suitable to learn on, though there are some people that can cast anything though! The newer ones practicaly cast them self. Also the line you have it spooled with plays a part! You do have to pay your dues though. You have to follow through and cast with one fluid movement. If you do anything to let the spool turn faster then the lines is coming off, you get backlash. If you think about it, every backlash you have had, you know it's coming before it actualy backlash's. I would say use the heaviest weight your rod can handle. If you can cast 20 feet ok. Keep casting 20 feet until you can do it with out thinking about it. Then try to increase your distance in small steps and then with less weight!
    You also want to make sure your line is matched to your rod. Also, baitcaster's are alot harder to cast in the wind! Practice, practice, practice, you can do it!
     
  8. maddcatter

    maddcatter New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    Newark, Oh

    It sounds to me like you're putting too much pressure on the spool with your thumb. Also, it sounds like you're thumbing the spool too early.
    In my opinion, you should try practicing short, soft casts with a 2 ounce weight. Just until you get the hang of it.
     
  9. wishiwasfishin

    wishiwasfishin New Member

    Messages:
    776
    State:
    kentucky
    to me it's not how hard you throw it's how smooth.just act like ya got chicken livers on your hook when you cast...easy... then after you get the hang of it you can let em rip.like the other guys said use the brake if ya got it and just keep throwing and it will come to ya.
     
  10. Cornmeal and Catfish

    Cornmeal and Catfish New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Covington, Louisiana
    The reels are harder to set up, for a beginner, than to cast.
    Here's my #1 BAITCASTING TIP for a beginner...

    Only place 1/3 of the specified yardage found on the reel. This will varry depending on whatever test line you are spooling with. This will cut back the number of birds nest that you have.
     
  11. Vacatfisher

    Vacatfisher New Member

    Messages:
    72
    tons ya can do...

    start out by cleaning out the bearings with ligher flud...letem soak for 30 min...then let them air dry for 5 minutes....put GREASE in them....not oil...you can use oil...but its faster....i use nothing in my bearings..no oil or grease...but they are ceramic hybrids and extremely fast....

    also if you reel has a centrifugal casting system...use it...put 2 brakes in so they are able to slide on the pin...push them toward the spool shaft and put the reel back together.they will cause the spool to slow by dragging on a ring...DO NOT PUT GREASE/OIL ON THE BRAKES...it causes them to lose the ability to slide out on the pin

    another form of control is machanical brake...on an ABU it SHOULD NOT be tight...it causes spool bearing damage...there should be a small amount of side to side knock in the spools movement in free spool...IT SHOULDNT BE USED AS A BRAKING SYSTEM....the booklets that come with the reels are designed for casting light lures...not 2 plus ounces of weight...other reels than abus are designed differently can be set up different...but for distance u should not use the mechanical brake knob(s) as a form of slowing the reel

    you will be able to thro your reel with grease in the bearngs and brakes in it with a slight knock in the spool...DO NOTthumb the line until the end of the cast when its 5-10 feet from the water...and when u do thumb it presss hard and dont let the spool keep spinning.....if the spool keeps spinning there will be tiny burn marks on your thumb and YOUR LINE....

    line level on the spool...line diameter...oil/grese viscosity in bearings or bushings and method and amount of braking(centrifugal/magnetic) all effect the cast...to get max distance u must find the correct combination of all variables

    it is possible to cast baitcasters like ct framed abus over 300 yards...levelwind abus are capable of over 200 yards...this however is with out bait and just a 4-6 ounce sinker...also u shouldnt expect to throw a 6 foot rod 200 yards... size/shape of the spool of a reel also determines some casting properties...a 5500 abu for example casts better for max distance with .28 mm line...but a 6500 does better with .31....all depends on rod/reel/caster
     
  12. Itch2Scratch

    Itch2Scratch New Member

    Messages:
    1,662
    State:
    Ivy Bend on LOZ, Missouri
    1. Adjust the cast control(knob by the star drag). Start with a weight on the end of line and let it free spool to the floor...if you get over run, then tighten cast control knob slightly and continue doing this till you have no over run.

    2. If your use to using a spincast reel (push button) it's really not that much different but you will need to "retrain" your thumb. Do this by making yourself keep your thumb on the bar on the back of the baitcaster throughout the cast, only curl the tip of your thumb back rather than lifting it off like you did with the spincast. When the weight is about to hit the water, lightly put pressure on the spool.

    3. Practice, practice, practice...repitition is the best way to learn anything!

    I taught my kids and several freinds using this method and they have all stayed with using the baitcasters since.;) GOOD LUCK, It's not as hard to learn as it seems.:)
    :0a26:
     
  13. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    try to throw it start up in the air. i think the release is a lot sooner on a baitcaster reel. it took me a while to learn how to but thats all i use now. if i try to throw another reel now i throw it straight up in the air...lol. i use the abu reels now, i can throw them and put them in the rod holder before the bait hits the water most of the time. just dont hook the vhfs antenna. bad problem.
     
  14. catter5000

    catter5000 New Member

    Messages:
    198
    State:
    TULSA,OK
    Like most have said and I agree 100%,PRACTICE,PRACTICE,PRACTICE then practice same more.Each spring I take a pole out in the yard and give it a throw.I do this with most of my heavy tackle,baitcasters only,I find this helps me save face when I go with friends.I don't like to look bad.But,really just try to practice until you feel comfortable.Learning to throw a large baitcaster is a challenge,but when you get it you will love big baitcasters.
     
  15. catter5000

    catter5000 New Member

    Messages:
    198
    State:
    TULSA,OK
    Thought I would add another note here,unlike a lot of fisherman some of us old goats have been throwing bait casters for close to 50 years. Back in the day before freespool and drags.Freespool and drag was the one God gave you,your thumb.This is where the term educated thumb comes from.I still have several of these that still work like new.