How do fish get into remote ponds

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Jerry60k, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. Jerry60k

    Jerry60k New Member

    Messages:
    881
    State:
    Chelyan, West V
    So have you ever been way out in the woods far from man and find a small pond inhabited with sunfish and/or bass ?

    How do you reckon they got there without stocking ?

    I have always wondered this and the answer I came up with is this.Ducks and other such birds like Herons maybe even mammals such as Raccons all feed in shallow water right.Ok we al know sunfish and bass spawn in shallow water.I think maybe the fertilized eggs may cling to the Ducks feathers and later when they are Flyind and see this new water hole they will decide to stop and preen themselves thereby depositing the stow-away eggs into a otherwise fishless body of water.

    So what do you all think.This is just food for thought.
     
  2. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I have seen ponds downstream so to speak that I thought might have been stocked inadvertantly stocked by high water ,flooding of a pond and the fish making thier way into another pond.
     

  3. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    I think that flooding plays a part too. I've seen fish in some pretty unlikely places after a good rain...Like in the middle of the highway. I think they can go a long way in a flooded ditch. Most ponds have some source, like a ditch or creek.
     
  4. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    They get in there lke Richard said and also by birds. Birds that grab a fish with eggs and goes to a different pond with him. It is amazing the things that mother nature is capable of.
     
  5. Dano

    Dano New Member

    Messages:
    13,712
    State:
    Texas
    yea, ducks, birds and other animals, floods and maybe Toronto's , high winds could possibly pick up fish eggs or even small fish and throw them throughout different places when they die down.
    it doesn't take but one or 2 eggs to start a chain reaction.
    mother nature has it's way's
     
  6. orion_xxvx

    orion_xxvx New Member

    Messages:
    397
    State:
    North Central Missouri
    You be surprised how much exploring and hanging out at the "secret pond" kids do. I used walk through the woods for hours as a kid and never think anything about it. It wasnt anything to ride my bike out to a friends farm " 10 miles one way " to fish for a few hours. So its quite possible you werent the first explorer to find that pond.
     
  7. wishiwasfishin

    wishiwasfishin New Member

    Messages:
    776
    State:
    kentucky
    thats a sound theroy and very possible same as the post about flooding.
     
  8. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    Alot of them are stocked when birds wade in water that has fish, picking up fish eggs in their feathers and then fly to another pond.
     
  9. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    Jerry almost 50 years I ask the same thing and was told fish eggs got there in bird feathers.
     
  10. Wil

    Wil New Member

    Messages:
    1,746
    State:
    Minden Nebraska
    youre exactly right brother
     
  11. Junior42

    Junior42 New Member

    Messages:
    500
    State:
    Catlettsburg, KY
    I have always been told bird feathers also.
     
  12. mariofish

    mariofish New Member

    Messages:
    914
    State:
    wv
    nice hat:cool2:
     
  13. Scott Daw

    Scott Daw New Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    State:
    Allentown, Pennsylvania
    Besides by birds and high waters..... ox bow lakes which eventually turn into ponds when they fill with sediment are formed when a stream/river bends and then water decides to take a easier path. This leaves what they call an ox bow lake. The fish ended up stranded when the river changed paths.