How did you come to choose your rig?

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by loppdawg69, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. loppdawg69

    loppdawg69 New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    California
    I have been fishing for roughly 20 years now. Since the beginning my dad showed me a rig that used a weight at the bottom 2 hooks spaced a foot apart and then a swivel to connect it to your main line (see surfrig.jpg below). I know these are commercially available, and you can just attach hooks, but i prefer to make my own leaders. I have only fished this way, and here in the Bay Area of CA, i have only seen other people fish this rig. Now that i have been frequenting catfish1, I notice that the carolina is almost the exclusive rig of choice (example below). Now this may be that the carolina is more suited for larger southern cats or heck any number of reasons that i just may not know. My question to all the anglers out there is what is your rig of choice and how did you come to choose it? Furthermore, have you ever used the surf rig that I described above?
     

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  2. alton

    alton New Member

    Messages:
    1,045
    State:
    Illinois
    The main reason I use a carolina type rig is so when the fish takes the bait, they don't feel the weight of the sinker. I would love to use a double hook set up, but fishing a lot of current and a river bottom full of rocks and other debris, the extra hook is one more thing to get snagged. And God forbid, what if you ended up with a 60# blue on each hook at the same time.:eek:oooh:
     

  3. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    I almost never use a Carolina rig - I fish rivers and don't like the idea of 6 or 8 oz no-roll sinkers sliding up and down the monofilament, abrading it and potentially leaving me open to a lost fish.

    Instead, I use a rig similar to your "surf" rig. It's essentially a 3-way rig, minus several knots and all the swivels.

    It consists of a dropper loop, 12 to 16 inches long, with a hook tied to the loop using a Palomar knot. I leave a section of the main line (actually the "tag" end after tying the dropper loop) about 12 inches long, put a surgeon's loop in the end of it and attach either a regular or flat bank sinker to it.

    The advantages of this rig are that I can re-tie in about 30 seconds using 3 incredibly simple knots; I've got 2 strands of mono going to the hook, which means more abrasion resistance from toothy critters; and the rig helps keep the bait up off the bottom - the sinker is resting on the bottom but the loop is above it, fluttering in the current.

    The only real drawback is that if the sinker gets hung, you'll probably lose the whole rig - but that's the same problem you have with the Carolina rig. Only a traditional 3-way rig using a lighter line for the sinker will give you a chance of salvaging the hook when the sinker gets hung. Way too much work for my taste.

    I learned the rig from Steve Brown of Catfish Safari Guide Service (BOC sponsor) about 2 years ago and have been using it quite successfully ever since. I figure if it's good enough for a professional guide to use day in and day out, it's good enough for me...
     
  4. loppdawg69

    loppdawg69 New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    California
    Since coming to the forums i have given the carolina a try and if anything it snags me up more then my double hook rig due to hook dragging on the bottom. if your line is tight on the double hook rig, then both hooks will be suspended off the bottom and the weight is the only thing that touches ground. I have even gone far enough to make the length between the first hook and the weight 2 - 3 ft to get even more distance off the ground. As for heavy current, i just adjust weight size to compensate. a 2 ounce river weight will hold in a decent current.
     
  5. alton

    alton New Member

    Messages:
    1,045
    State:
    Illinois
    I agree with with your opinion on the no rolls sliding up and down the line. I do not use them either. I use a sinker slide with a flat bank attached.
     
  6. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    it all depends on where i am fishing... i've used the carolina rig quite a bit, but i have modified at a little bit, i'll put a small slip float between the hook and the swivel to keep the hook just a little big above the bottom... when fishing in cover i'll use a rig i came up with, at least i haven't ever seen anyone else use it and my buddies thought i had gone nuts when i first tried it, i'll slide on a slip bobber stop and some beads, then one side of a swivel, then a slip float big enough to pull up the bait, but not the sinker, then some more beads, and then tie a swivel to the end of the line, the last bead you put on should be big enough that the swivel will not pass it, then i tie some line to the end of the swivel at the end and the other end of that line gets tied to a sinker, then the end of the free floating swivel, i tie about 2 feet of line to the free end of it, slip on a smaller slip float and some beads on both sides, and then tie a hook to the end of that line, it should look like the surf rig, but only one hook and it has a bobber on the main line and one on the hook line. with this rig, i can adjust the depth of the bait to suspend it right over cover and the only thing able to catch the cover is the sinker, but if you tie on an egg sinker, it prolly won't get stuck on anything. when using this rig i can keep my line tight and don't have to worry bout watchin a bobber in the dark, and when a fish pulls on this it should be noticed on the rod, or click the bait clicker. this rig does not cast out the best, as there is weight on one line, and then a hook with bait on another line, i use it mainly for fishing straight down or for short casts.

    one of my friends seen me usin this rig, and then decided that he would use it for ba$$ and used a longer hook line with no float and put a minnow on the hook cause the ba$$ were hittin at the surface, then he had a minnow just under the surface with invisable mono and was nailin the heck out of some ba$$... at least till they quit hittin on the surface... lol
     
  7. rich-online

    rich-online New Member

    Messages:
    343
    State:
    California
    In the relatively still waters where I fish, the Carolina rig works quite well, and it can be used for both trout and catfish. The main advantage for me is that I can hang a bobber on the line between two rod eyes and have a strike indicator that's easier to see than a rod tip.

    -- Rich
     
  8. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    Diff rigs were developed for diff situations.

    The fact is that your "surf rig" is called a high/low bottom rig around here. It is used by folks dropping baits straight down from a boat, so that they present 2 baits at slightly different depths (or heights off the bottom). It has some advantages for other situations, too. In the surf it can be better than a Carolina Rig because the longer leader on a Carolina rig can wrap around the mainline (as a result of the wave action) and make a mess.

    Carolina rigs were developed (under that name) by bass fishermen, but the "sliding sinker rig" has been around forever. I allows a fish to take line without havinf to drag the sinker around. It works well from a boat cast down current (like in a river), because the current keeps everything straightened out in a nice line. I often use a pyramid sinker on a sinker slide above my swivel (instead of the egg or NoRoll in a Carolina rig) to position a bait accross the current in my coastal SC rivers. The pyramid holds fairly well on the mostly sand bottoms.
     
  9. mrmarkedwards

    mrmarkedwards Active Member

    Messages:
    921
    State:
    Delaware
  10. baitcastingcats

    baitcastingcats New Member

    Messages:
    9
    State:
    washington
    i use carolina and works well for me
     
  11. stuart

    stuart New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Louisiana
    My rig design is a product of my fishing conditions. It seems to be the only one that will work. If you want to call losing a ton of lead working. But thats what you get when you fish the locks.

    stu
     
  12. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Marty, what knot do you use to form your dropper loop?
     
  13. yeppa

    yeppa New Member

    Messages:
    636
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    Several of you gentlemen have mentioned using "sinker slides". That sound like a fishin' contraption that I haven't seen. I feel real deprived.
     
  14. Cathooker

    Cathooker New Member

    Messages:
    299
    State:
    Ga
    I never use the carolina rig....we used to call it the fish finder rig because it moves around a lot in the current. It will get snagged more too. We do almost all of our cattin by drift fishing. We fish straight down bouncing our sinkers off the bottom. I use 50 to 80 lb test leaders. I attach the leader to my main line with a barrel swivel. I have a dropper loop tied in middle of this the leader to attach the hook to. At the bottom of the leader I tie a double surgeons loop. I take a small snap swivel, tie on 12lb test mono and attach a 3 to 5 oz bank sinker on. I take this short sinker leader and snap the swivel to the loop in the bottom of my main leader. I keep several of these sinker drops rigged up. When you snag it is usually the sinker and it is easy to pop off with the 12lb line. This way you do not lose very many hook leaders.
     
  15. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I used to use a similar rig to yours. Just without all the swivels. The two lines tangling became a pain in the rear. Then I started using the Carolina rig maybe about 4 years ago. I had better success with it at least I thought at the time and have been using exclusively. I have been experimenting with different rigs this years. One that use don't have to sit there an tie knots all day...lol... But the Carolina rig does get hung up especially I found the hook usually gets stuck on branch or vegetation.