Hook *not* rusting away in water?!

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by Spongiform, Jun 18, 2006.

  1. Spongiform

    Spongiform New Member

    Messages:
    150
    State:
    Virginia
    I've always thought and heard that It's OK to cut the hook loose because it'll just rust away after a few days under water.

    Yesterday I was fishing at my hole and got a nice bite - the fish snagged me up on some debris and got loose with my bait :/

    When I reeled in the debris it was a mess of branches. I found a rig I had lost to the same snag about 5-6 weeks ago tangled in it! The hook is still shiny and new as the day I lost it - after being in the river all that time.

    It's a size 2 or 3 silver treble hook. Looks pretty much like this.

    So - whats the deal guys? Is it just some types of hooks? Is this hook special or something?

    ~
    Brian
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    i dont think the hooks rust away, rather the flesh and skin around the hook dies,falls out, and is replaced thus removing the hook.
     

  3. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I am now 61.I always bought the best hooks when I got grown and could afford them.Tinned for freshwater and Stainless Steel for saltwater when possible.I now think I was wrong to do so.These hooks last for years.Possibly thousands of years for the Stainless Steel.I have no idea how many of these hooks I have bought in my life Time.I do know that it was MANY THOUSAND.I have very few left today.This means that I have lost thousands of potential death traps for fish and game.All those years and I never even thought about what I was doing.I now buy hooks that will rust.A little spray cooking oil preserves them.peewee-williams
     
  4. dixiedrifter

    dixiedrifter New Member

    Messages:
    102
    State:
    Tennessee
    Many silver colored hooks are plated with a corrosion resistant material... which IMO is good because it keeps them from rusting in your tackle box before you use them.

    Who ain't got some water in their box at one point in time and had a bunch of hooks rust out on them?
     
  5. Redd

    Redd New Member

    Messages:
    790
    State:
    Southeast Kansas
    I've known cats and turtles to somehow eventually work the hook loose, out of their mouths. Ones that I couldn't even remove. So I cut the line and went to take 'em home and when I got there, the hook was out. It ain't the first time I've known that to happen either. So, I wouldn't worry a single bit about it. Good luck Sponge...

    -Red
     
  6. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    Yep, i've had this happen many times! :eek:oooh:

    As far as the hook rusting out, someone said something about the skin dieing, allowing the hook to fall out. I've heard this and i've also heard that the bodily fluids of the fish cause the hooks to break down.
    I don't really know though.

    Eric
     
  7. sgt_rob

    sgt_rob Member

    Messages:
    961
    State:
    Bossier City, LA
    I have a flathead in my aquarium now with a standard gold Aberdeen hook still in him and will let yall know how he does in the future. As far as the stainless hooks, I'm think they will outlast several fish unless there is an acid that is excreated by the fish to dissolve it.
     
  8. wishiwasfishin

    wishiwasfishin New Member

    Messages:
    776
    State:
    kentucky
    i have caught fish before and they have a rusty hook stuck in them. i always let them go just for the fact if they survived one fisherman then they deserve it:confused2:
     
  9. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    Catfish, and channel cats in particular, are very good at dislodging things that dont belong in their body (radio transmitters, hooks, etc). If the fish gets guthooked, then it shouldnt be much of a problem. The fish creates acid in its stomach to digest it, and acid also corrodes metals; almost all of them. Iron, nickel, copper, magnesium, manganese, any of the metals that are used in hooks are able to be dissolved by acids. The only ones that really arent are gold, platinum, iridium, and tantalum, and I bet most of you havent heard of the last two :lol: So I dont think having a hook stuck in a fish is too much to worry about.
     
  10. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I hooked up and disconnected Sulfuric Acid Rail Road Tank Cars for unloading for over 35 years.We used Stainless Steel fittings as they held up to the 98 degree acid that we unloaded.peewee-williams
     
  11. kurt

    kurt New Member

    Messages:
    83
    State:
    ohio
    I think for rust to happen there has to be air and moist climate. If it is just under water i dont think it will rust out.
     
  12. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    I think some of the hook process is just like your body getting rid of a sticker. Your body knows it doesn't belong there and does everything in its power to get it out, same with a fish. As for rusting out I think that goes back to the older material that's not used for the "high end" hooks that most of us use. I may be wrong but at least I try.
     
  13. catseeman

    catseeman New Member

    Messages:
    1,189
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    When I was a carknocker at amtrak I got stainless splinters once in awhile they worked themselfs out or festered and came out. Bodies reject foriegn objects all the time.
     
  14. barbel

    barbel New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Somewhere
    If there is dissolved oxygen in the water (which there is bound to be if the fish is there) then that will rust the hook too. And the body rejecting the hook would probably happen fairly welll too. I have had the same thing with the splinters happen to me.