Homemade fishing sinkers

Discussion in 'Misc Fishing Tackle Talk' started by prostreetS10, Aug 31, 2007.

  1. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    i was wondering if anyone knows if there is a way to make homemade sinkers harder. my problem is after one or two trips out to the river my sinker will be almost smashed closed at the ends and will no slip on the line which freys they line up pretty bad. anything i can do? or just rerig more often
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    The problem is the lead content... you have a very soft lead. You may save these sinkers to recast as a different type of sinker, such as split shots or clamp sinkers which require soft lead. You can also try to mix your lead with another grade of lead... I think lead from auto tire weights is more of a hard lead... try mixing some of these with your current lead and recasting the sinkers. You just got to experiment to find a better grade of lead for your needs.
     

  3. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    yea thats what i was thinking i was going to hear. either way free sinkers are better
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Pure lead is soft, which is why most 'lead' you find has other metals mixed with it. As already mentioned, tire weights are harder; adding some old type from a print shop will harden up your lead, and adding some 'lead' pellets for shotgun shells will really harden it up.
     
  5. ateamfisherman

    ateamfisherman New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Texas
    go to lumber yard or soil field store get some babbit and put it in whenyou melt it. the more you put the harder it will get. thanks Sam Davis
     
  6. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I had the same problem.
    I just used an oversized drill bit and counter sank both holes.
    That way the end "cannot" close and pinch your line.You'll want to burnish the edges though.That will round off the sharp edges.
    best of luck
    just
     
  7. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    thanks for all the help cause its time to make some again. i will have to try some new things, also what is babbit
     
  8. fishnfwl

    fishnfwl New Member

    Messages:
    3,334
    State:
    South Cent
    Babbit Metal


    Soft, white metal, an alloy of tin, lead, copper, and antimony, used to reduce friction in bearings, developed by the US inventor Isaac Babbit in 1839.
     
  9. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    Are you using no roll sinkers? If you are, a friend of mine gave me a good idea,that will be easier on your line and you won't have to worry about it if the ends of your sinkers are smashed closed on the ends. Get some small screw eyes and screw one of them in one end of your sinker. You'll also have to get you some sinker slides. After you screw the screw eye into the sinker then you just fasten the sinker on to the sinker slide and walla,that baby will slide up and down that line like you can't believe! I'm a believer,and will never go back to using no roll sinker attached directly to my line again. Try it,you'll like it!
     
  10. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    do you use beads? they might help.
     
  11. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    im just using eggs right now i want to get a no roll mold for them. i have heard alot of good things about it. thanks for the ideas.
     
  12. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    yeah, i use beads but they still crush in. i got the lead from a plumbing company i used to work for and it was some old lead water lines that we dug up . this stuff is just really soft.
     
  13. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Save that lead for pouring sinkers or jigs that have fine detail; pure lead will fill those small areas much better than, say, tire weights. Then get you some tire weights to use for your egg or no-roll sinkers.
     
  14. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    There is another way to keep your egg sinker ends from closing.
    Use a small stick as a stop. It can be as small as a leaf stem.
    The reason it closes is it hits something hard.Lead by its nature is soft and mallable.
    Stop the end from hammering and it stays open.
    best of luck
    just
     
  15. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    If you put a small stick in as a stop,aren't you defeating the purpose of using a slip sinker?
     
  16. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    No. I don't want my sinker to travel all the way down to my hook so I put a stop on my line about 2' above the hook. Its free to slip anywhere above that 2' though.
     
  17. PHLIPS4BIGKATS

    PHLIPS4BIGKATS New Member

    Messages:
    2,679
    State:
    Alma Kansas
    On all of my molds I knoched out where the wire goes through from the 1/16th wire to a 1/8th, and that stopped them from smashing my knots.My no roll mold I hand out of a block of aluminum.
     
  18. waldorftbeagle

    waldorftbeagle New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    NC
    Where do you bu your molds and what heat source do you use to heat the lead/metal to melting point?
     
  19. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    In over 50 years of molding sinkers and jigs, I've used a number of different heat sources, ranging from the kitchen (gas) stove to an electric hotplate bought for the purpose. Now, I'm using the burner from my turkey fryer I bought at Wal Mart; it works great, putting out lots of heat to melt the lead quickly. And I can use it outside! When I started pouring lead, I didn't have the money to buy any kind of special pot to melt the lead in, so I rescued an old pot from the trash. I guess I got in the habit of doing that, because I still do that today. I like using a large, heavy-duty steel saucepan. I don't like using aluminum for heating something that hot. A pot/saucepan being thrown away because the non-stick surface has been mostly scratched away is always a good bet. Again, when I started making sinkers, I had no money for molds, so I had to improvise. I found an old chisel with a missing wooden handle that I used for sinkers. I'd pour the cavity full, stick in a U-shaped piece of wire, and when it cooled, I had a sinker. I'd also make no-roll sinkers by putting melted lead into a spoon and letting it cool. Then I'd drill a hole in the small end, smooth off the edges of the hole, and I had a no-roll. Different size spoons produced different size sinkers. Eventually, I began my mold collection; I now have homemade molds and commercial molds ranging from cheap, to moderate price, to top of the line. And I can tell you, you get what you pay for. The cheaper the mold, the more effort you're going to have to spend on each sinker or jig to make it useable.
     
  20. PHLIPS4BIGKATS

    PHLIPS4BIGKATS New Member

    Messages:
    2,679
    State:
    Alma Kansas
    Daryel, ( DO IT MOLDS ). You can get the through Cabelas ,Bass Pro, my last one I carved out of a block of aluminum ,took about an hour or so trying to keep my depth even!:0a26: