Home Made Sinker's "Problem's"

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by canepole, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. canepole

    canepole New Member

    Messages:
    730
    State:
    Woodlawn Tennessee
    Well boy's I got my new melting pot and mold from Catfish Connection last week and this past weekend I thought I would make up some new sinker's, I had about twenty pounds of tire weight's, and I got a old coffee can and put it on my old hot plate and melted them and cleaned the junk out and took a muffin pan [Thanks for the Idea of the muffin pan}
    and made some ingots, Everything went smooth then I took the new pot and cranked it up on high and thru a few of the lead muffin's in and before to long I had some hot lead, Then I started making sinker's and I made about thirty of them they all turned out good except "THEY ALL HAD WRINGLES"
    I never have had this problem before and I was thinking later that I may have had the heat to high, And I thought I would ask some of you feller's that have more experence with sinker making,
     
  2. boliver

    boliver New Member

    Messages:
    198
    State:
    Rudy Ark
    i got a melting pot for christmas and i've had the same problem and i thought i started pouring too soon or the mold wasn't hot enough. maybe someone will give good answer soon
     

  3. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    The only reason I can think of that that might happen is because your mold is not hot enough. Maybe the next time you go to pour, try heating the mold somehow or letting the lead sit in the mold for a few minutes after the first pour. The first set may not come out very nice but the heat absorbed by the mold will make the next pours better. It may help to allow the first couple of pours to sit in the mold for a few minutes each. :confused:

    Another thing that you may want to try is getting the lead as hot as you can. It will take longer to cool and will probably allow you to fill the whole mold before much cooling or hardening takes place.

    I hope this helps...
     
  4. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    Canepole,

    Sounds like the mold is cold. Here's my technique:

    Start by cleaning a cool mold with acetone or alcohol. Whatever you do, don't use solvents anywhere near the heated pot. Allow the mold to dry.

    Using a cigarette lighter, turn the flame up high, and smoke each cavity black with lampblack soot. Can also be done with a candle flame, or a MAPP or acetylene torch with no Oxygen.This forms a release barrier.

    Find a ladle that will hold enough molten lead to pour the mold at least twice - this will hold heat in the ladle while you pour. Use clean ingot, melt up a potfull, and use a little piece of parrafin wax or kids crayon tossed on top of the molten lead, which will melt and catch fire. This will flux the top of the lead, and then skim any dross off with a spoon until you have a shiny melt. Repeat flux whenever you get dull metal on the pot.

    Dip up the lead in the ladle, and slowly and carefully pour a narrow stream into each sprue from one side. Do not flood the sprue or you trap air in the mold - you should be able to see down the hole as you pour. Fill up the sprue, and top it off to make a hump. This provides a bit of head pressure to fully fill the cavity. Try to pour each hole independently.

    Depending on the size of the sinkers in the mold, you'll probably need to pour 2 to 4 sets that are throwaways, just to heat up the mold. Don't use any other heat source on the mold or you can warp it.

    After the warm-up, keep pouring at a regular pace. Don't let the pot get to less than half full before you recharge it with clean ingot. If you know what your ingot weighs, you can pour an equivalent weight of sinkers and then drop one ingot.

    I find it's easier to keep pouring until I get all I want, then bust off all the sprues and remelt them. Same goes for pull pins on egg and no-rolls, get a bunch of pins so you can keep pouring.
     
  5. Bigun

    Bigun New Member

    Messages:
    234
    State:
    Burnet, TX
    Back in the good old days 50s and 60s Wheel weights were good material for making lead bullets. It was consistent in composition a little high in antimony and low in tin. With the addition of a little pure lead and a little tin it made good bullets. Today the composition is questionable. I have been having a little of the same problem you mention. I am getting much better results with lead from telephone sheath and plummer scraps from lead vents. The sinkers that I make are from 1 to 5 oz egge sinkers this size is easy to cast. A friend makes 5/8 to 3/4 pinch on sinkers and we trade out. He only uses pure lead so the wings fill out and will bend right. This size is a lot harder to cast than larger sinkers. I don't turn my pot all the way up. Seems like it is set on 725°F
     
  6. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    sounds like the mold isnt hot enough yet. i usually pour about 20 messed up ones before they start coming out right.
     
  7. TIM HAGAN

    TIM HAGAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    State:
    Walkersvil
    Well I would add alittle Bore butter to your lead us old time Blackpower guys used this. This will help make a better and cleaner lead . As for the wringles you will need to let the lead get hotter . Wringles happen when the lead cools to fast. With the bore butter in your lead i will get a copper color on top when is hot and ready to go.
    I got this tip from a blackpower guy here he does his own 50 cal balls for tournament shoots. They all must weigh the same so he spends alot of time working with lead.
     
  8. canepole

    canepole New Member

    Messages:
    730
    State:
    Woodlawn Tennessee
    Thanks for all of your help and comments on this subject, I'm going to try and make some more in a week or so and will try the different things you all talked about, and post the results on here. Tom
     
  9. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    Alot of the bigger molds you have to modify somewhat the pour hole. Take a round chain saw file and hollow them out more taking out that fine edge. Alittle bit goes along way, so it will take several trys and pours to get it down where it needs to be. This will give you a faster pour into the cavity of the mold reducing the wrinkles somewhat. You will then have to upsize your side cutters to cut off the excess, but in the long run, get much better looking weights. While you are at it, buy 2 round chain saw files and duct tape them together for sharpening your hooks.
     
  10. truck

    truck New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    williamsburg ohio
    For the ppl that have a hot plate,set it on low place mold on it tell it gets hot and start pouring.Makes it alot easier,and if using rods they come out easy.Just wait a min before you remove the sinkers,put mold back on hotplate for a few secs and you are ready again;)
     
  11. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    It does sound like the lead isn't hot enough or cold mold. Some guys say that you have to watch how you heat a mold or it will warp. I have been just laying it on top if the ladle standing up the way you pour into it after the lead has melted for a few mins. and it is heated up and ready to accept lead. I have done this for years and have several different molds I work with.
     
  12. Chuckb

    Chuckb New Member

    Messages:
    211
    State:
    Pana Illinois
    Tom, why do you care if your sinkers have wrinkles lol. On another note, are you and Big George brothers :happ-big:
     
  13. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    lol chuck, ya tom they hit the nail on the head. if ya pnly poured 30 or so that was just about enough to get the mold hot enough to get rid of wrinkles. the lead is cooling to fast. i let my pot sit for several min on high and even with a cold mold the lead gets so hot it eliminates this prob.
     
  14. Big Sam

    Big Sam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,385
    State:
    Booneville AR
    Name:
    Sam
    It has been my experience that wrinkles are caused by the lead not going in the mold fast enough....As far as heating the mold just pour the first run and let it stay in there for a couple of minutes....works good....:)
     
  15. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    I would have to agree with Team wiskers and Sam 100% the faster you pour the better they will look I've thought of opening up the pour hole a little on a couple of them and am shure I will. If it takes me more than a second to fill up a cavity the sinker usualy won't look as good (wrinkled). Chuck, wrinkles dont usually bother me unless its were the line passes through causing rough spots were the line goes. If the holes are good it a keeper if not it goes back in one less thing thing to cut my line. :thumbsup: pour as fast as you can safely Ive gotten perfect looking sinkers out of a 40deg. (room temp in my garage) mold, I've gotten alot of sinkers I couldnt use (blobs) out of a smoken hot mold:thumbsup:
     
  16. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    BTW tire weights will be pretty hard to get all the wrinkles out because of the other metals in them. the 4oz was poured fast the 5oz slow
     

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  17. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Dennis,

    Thanks for the Crayon idea. I ever thought of that. I've been using NRA Approved Beeswax to flux with.
     
  18. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    now I am courius about the difference im gonna try the crayon fluxing idea see what difference it makes
     
  19. rasimmons

    rasimmons Guest

    the lines you are refering to are called flow lines witch can be caused by several things yes if the die is to cold or the lead is to cold but alot of the times both of these are not the problem if you cant get the metal in the sinker die fast enough the flow lines will remain also if the die is to hot you could end up with a air bubble on the inside of the sinker not visible in any way causing your sinker to way less than it should. I worked in a die cast shop for 7 years and built countless numbers of sinkers out of both zinc and lead ( my former boss would always get alittle mad at me for doing it on the clock ) and the best way i found to is to make about 30 sinkers let the die cool off and spray the heck out of it with wd40 I would also like to state that liquid metal is a very dangerous thing and I ask everyone to please be careful when using it a drop of water under the surface can send metal flying about the room like a 800 degree bullet wear eye protaction
     
  20. Ol Whiskers

    Ol Whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    290
    State:
    Fairfield Township, Ohio
    I started using the crayons when I ran out of beeswax. The kids were little and we always had busted crayons around, in the car seats, on the table, in the couch, on the back porch, in the dog bowl. Works just as well, and they're basically free if the kids aint usin 'em. Parrafin wax is OK, too. Chip off a pea sized chunk and toss it in.