holes in the river!!!

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by charbob4jesus, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. charbob4jesus

    charbob4jesus New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    missouri
    i hear that deep holes, pockets and structures are where the flatties are. how can you tell where a hole is where these fish are? with out a fish finder or boat?
     
  2. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Guess it depends on how big of river you are fishing. A good tip is look at the land above the water. If the land is steep going into the water thats a good indication what it's doing iunder the water. If you are fishing the missouri river the end of dike is going to be your holes. If it's a cut dike there is going to be a hole there too. Now if it's a small river it's going to be your standard riffle,hole, run situation. Now as far as flatheads go I always get them fishing close to the bank in the rocks. If there happens to be a down tree or other kind of wood there as well good chances a flatty is around.
     

  3. charbob4jesus

    charbob4jesus New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    missouri
    are there any dykes near kaw point?
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    It's called 'reading the water'. Look closely at the surface of the water, and you'll see differences; it doesn't look the same all over. Off the end of a dike or a point, you'll often see a 'seam', where the fast current runs right alongside calm water; or maybe there's an 'eddy', where the water swirls back on itself. A large rock or hole can cause a concentrated 'choppy' area. I've seen a 'standing wave' two feet high caused by a big hole in the bottom. (A standing wave is a wave that doesn't go anywhere, just stays in one place. You usually see them below small waterfalls on whitewater rapids on streams and rivers.) It takes time to learn, but it's really just a matter of seeing something different, and asking yourself why it looks like that. Of course, not every rock or hole is going to make a disturbance on the surface; that's why people buy depthfinders. So, while you can find some spots without one, your best bet is to hitch a ride with someone who has one and pay attention to the good looking spots you see on the finder, so you can locate them later.
     
  5. charbob4jesus

    charbob4jesus New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    missouri
    Is bank fishing on the river even gonna be proffitable, is it gonna be worth the time? or do i need to be a little bit more patient?
     
  6. Manny

    Manny New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Arnold, Mo
    I have a boat with a depth finder but still bank fish alot. So reading the water is always my best bet. I also went without a keeper fish for almost a year with a boat. Be patient, use fresh bait local to the area, and try deep ,shallow and an array of baits. Stinks, live, cut etc. because your on the bank you have to go with whats there wether it be a flathead ,blue or channel in all different sizes. :wink:
     
  7. charbob4jesus

    charbob4jesus New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    missouri
    thanks brother
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Bank fishing can be very productive, IF you find the right spot. IMO, the old saying that 10% of the water holds 90% of the fish is absolutely true. Sometimes the places you can get to on the bank just aren't productive, and finding a good spot is a real problem. Other times, there are bank spots that lots of people know are productive. Bank fishing below the dam here in Little Rock is not all that productive, while below Dardanelle Dam, about 65 miles upstream, it is very good. There's a good spot I can see from the I55 bridge over the Mississippi that's very good, but it's hard to get to, and is underwater when the river is up. I'm not sure, but I think that's where the guy was fishing when he caught a world record blue cat a few years back. I know it was somewhere in that general area, and that looks like the best spot.
     
  9. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    For large rivers it can be very hard to tell. The most effective way will be to simply ask local fisherman in your area where the holes are. You may even be able to get the answers you need right here on the boc.
     
  10. FLOAT TRIP WILLIE

    FLOAT TRIP WILLIE Active Member

    Messages:
    2,405
    State:
    St. Louis
    Yes bank fishing can be very proffitable, and relaxing....
    But patients is the key. The guys spoke on some key points to look for.
    I have four bank poles spreaded out. Its been times I could only use two cause the bite was really on. I also had my times when my four, my son's two went hrs without a bite. Thats when the relaxing part kick in....lol

    Here are some pictures from last week. All from the bank. Good luck


    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=93032&page=2
     
  11. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    Don't get discouraged brother.

    If you can't seem to get into a spot with fish, MOVE! There are fish everywhere. I have landed 38 flathead this year ALL from the bank. Granted my biggest was only 26lbs, but around here that is still a trophy.

    A couple things to think about...

    1) Bait - do you have the right bait? Do they want it?
    2) Time - When are you fishing? How long are you fishing?
    3) Tackle - are you using strong enough tackle to get them in?

    There are many more things that play in to catching fish, but these are some of the basics that many over look.

    Bait matters, I like to take a couple different options with me... Maybe they don't want gills today, maybe they want shad.

    If you aren't putting in the time on the water, you aren't going to learn to read it, and are relying strictly on luck that all the stars align and you are the winner... If you are fishing a spot that isn't productive at day, try at night.

    I lost a nice fish last night, I was trying out some new leaders, I got excited fumbled my star drag and lost it... Point is, if you don't have the equiptment to reel the biggest of the big in, don't be surprised if you miss a few...

    I have seen a lot of fishermen and women come and go because of any combination of these 3 things and others. I hope this helps in some way shape or form. Even if it gives you a new strategy to try once.

    I can't say this is the end all be all, but it is going back to basics and building that I believe in!!!
     
  12. Hurricane

    Hurricane New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    Arnold, Missouri
    Wow it looks like you had a good night. Were you fishing down town? I've been trying to find some spots to get to along the river since my buddy sold his boat, any suggestions where I can get river access?
     
  13. charbob4jesus

    charbob4jesus New Member

    Messages:
    60
    State:
    missouri
    the inly spots i know of in kansas city is kaw point. other than that you take a machette along the bank till you find a nice spot or look for the wing dykes.
     
  14. Hurricane

    Hurricane New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    Arnold, Missouri
    I'm in STL so kaw point is a little far for me but the machette thing sounds doable if I can get close to the river. I guess I just need to go out and burn some gas one day and see what I can find.
     
  15. delbert bumbleshoot

    delbert bumbleshoot New Member

    Messages:
    677
    State:
    Overland Park,Kansas
    No but there sure are a lot of them in Westport.:wink:
     
  16. bipolarguy

    bipolarguy New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Missouri
    well i can tell you by experience tha you only get out of it what you put in to it.and yes it is worth the time just do you homework and by that i mean study the river and watch what other people are doing and go from there.good luck and good fishing.