Hog dogs strike again.

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by jlingle, Oct 13, 2007.

  1. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    We set out this morning at 5am & took our dogs to go check out some grain patches where hogs had been spotted recently. We let the dogs & "roaded" them for about a half mile down the downwind side of a cut corn field & they struck and caught a boar about 5 minutes into our hunt. This was a really nice boar, probably in the 275-300 lb range, and he was an old cuss. His cutters were worn down to big fat nubs. The weirdest thing about this boar was that he never made a peep when the dogs got on him. No grunting, no squealing, he never made a sound. Our dogs caught and we ran in to try to leg him & get control, but he was too darn big for Lance to get the back end of him off the ground. I ran in and assisted and we got him up and stuck him. 1st pig down. We loaded up our dogs & pig and went a mile up the road to another feed patch, and let the dogs loose again. In about 2 minutes, we had dogs fighting something in the ditch..... we roar up there in the pickup to see bad news, a porcupine. So, after a brief 1.5 hr stint of pulling quills, we were back in business. There was a peanut field about 3 miles south of the porcupine disaster, so we went there next. The dogs hardly touched the ground when they struck and took off. It was getting light enough to just see dust being kicked up in the field, and these dogs were BURNING UP A TRACK on a pig. They were getting out of the country pretty quick, so we unloaded the 4 wheelers and took off across the cattle pasture after them. That race took us 1.25 miles down through some grassland, rolling sandhills, and finally into the sandy river bottom country. It was a bruiser of a sow, about 225-250 lbs & she bayed up in a pond. The dogs were trying to catch from all directions when we ran up there, and my buddy Corry and I jumped in the water's edge and legged her. I stuck her directly in the heart this time, and she was gone in less than 5 seconds. As we were trying to get her loaded on the 4 wheeler, our dogs struck again and took off. We drug the sow out into an open area and took off after the dogs. When we got to where we thought the bay would be, there were dogs and hogs running in all directions. I have no idea how many hogs were in there, they were all running through thick grass all over the place. The dogs would get together & start to bay, then the bay would break & it would be off to the races again. This went on for nearly an hour. There were literally so many hogs in that area that our dogs could never get together to bay a single hog. We had hogs run within 20 yards of us twice. One of the guys in our hunting party had to be back in town early, so we caught our dogs at the first opportunity & headed in. It was a fantastic morning of hog hunting, and one of the most exciting hog hunts I've ever been on. We could've done without pulling quills for a while (and nearly getting dog bit during the process) but it was one great day to be in the woods.

    Here's some pictures. I'm the one with no hat. Then there's Corry, who is the one in the green shirt, and Lance in the t-shirt. The lighter colored hog is the sow, the dark one is the boar. In the pictures, the sow looks bigger but that definitely wasn't the case.
     

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  2. Mike81

    Mike81 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,231
    State:
    Alabama
    Gets me pumped just reading your story, awesome. I know it was a blast, nice hogs man.

    Good hunting
    mike
     

  3. Big B

    Big B New Member

    Messages:
    226
    State:
    North Texas
    That sounds like a lot of fun.
     
  4. catfisherman60

    catfisherman60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,348
    State:
    Greenwood AR.
    Look like some nice hogs.
     
  5. bad apple

    bad apple New Member

    Messages:
    52
    State:
    florida
    man sounds like great time...those hogs there look like wooly mammoths compared to the ones i got at my feeder down here.... hogs on feeder.jpg
     
  6. fishnfool68

    fishnfool68 New Member

    Messages:
    379
    State:
    Near Tulsa Oklahoma
    Thanks for shareing the story and the pics!Looks like you guys had a blast.
     
  7. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Hog hunting is something I've never had the opportunity to try.

    Looks like a blast...and I've ate wild hog cooked in the ground...good stuff!

    Here in Se Kansas there is no population of wild hogs...only a few feral ones.

    Ks recommends shooting them on sight...I've gotten 3 in the past 10 years... 2 deer hunting and 1 while duck hunting.

    I have been reading articles about wild hogs (Not hog farms) down in Arkansas...which isn't that far from me...one of these days I'll have to book a hunt down there.
     
  8. tufffish

    tufffish New Member

    Messages:
    1,196
    State:
    Texas
    jarod, are you using any of your greyhounds. down here the guys are running at least 2 greyhounds to catch and stop the hogs, then using the other hounds to bay them.
     
  9. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    Sounds like the coyote hunters around here...they use packs of chaser dogs...outfitted with radio tracking collars.

    They wait until the pack crosses the road...chasing a coyote...then release the fresh kill dogs.
     
  10. catfishcentral

    catfishcentral New Member

    Messages:
    1,497
    State:
    OK
    Thanks for the pics and story there Jerrod. Looks and sounds like a blast. Do you cook up that hog whole with some frosty malt beverages?:big_smile:
     
  11. jlingle

    jlingle New Member

    Messages:
    1,036
    State:
    Altus, Okl
    I whacked the hams and backstraps (?) off the sow & cooked them. I tried injecting them with cajun marinade & smoking them. The backstraps were terrific. The hams were so bad they were inedible. Weird.

    The dogs we use are mostly black mouth curs, catahoulas, and several have mixes of bulldog and hound in them. It seems like nearly all of the dogs we work with have either some bmc, or catahoula. Both breeds are gritty and smart enough to keep from getting hurt.... not to mention have hunting & working instincts bred into them. I've never ran a greyhound with them. Mostly we are allowing the dogs to pick up a scent & run a track to a bay. It's pretty exciting, because you usually only get a few yips while they're running the track, but when they get the hog bayed up, all hell breaks loose. We hunt with several different guys who already have experienced dogs & their dogs are all pretty catchy. They don't have any problem at all trying to pull hide on a hog. Unfortunately this leads to some beat up dogs from time to time, but in the long run it's much safer for us to work with rough dogs. Rough dogs will occupy and even control a big hog enough that we can get in and grab a back leg, get the hog's back end off the ground, and flip him on his side. Once the hog is on its side, we can either tie it or kill it with a knife. Either way, none of it happens without a few rough dogs to hold the hog while we do our thing. We are currently looking for a pure catch dog. A good catch dog can be led in on a leash and turned loose to hammer the hog at the appropriate time. He'll dart in and grab an ear and WILL NOT LET GO. Extremely important, that the catch dog refuses to let go until we tell him to. We've hunted around some extremely good catch dogs in the past few months, and there's nothing like the security that they can provide the rest of the pack while the dogs are baying. If you have a good catch dog, when he reaches the bay..... the hog is completely at our mercy within seconds.

    Anyway, I've hunted hogs for years but just recently started running dogs on them. It's awesome.
     
  12. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I just cleaned and oiled my old "Pig Sticker" that we all highly prized and carried for Hog catching back in the 50's and 60's.It is a very old 17 inch over all length bayonet with a 11 5/8 inch long x 7/8 inch wide x 3/16 inch thick blade.If you got in trouble,it was long enough to reach the vitals from any angle and the blade was small and strong enough to reach the brain through a eye,ear,roof of the mouth or the heart through the jaws if you were down and a hog eating on you.I have heard of men killing the hog all ways with them when a hog got them down.The old men said they had been carrying them since the late 1800's when catching hogs.You could get two hands on the handle to really drive it home if needed.It is a "A # 1 Hand Spear!They also said that was where the words "Pig sticker" came from.You boys keep having fun and don't get reckless.You do it often enough and long enough,somebody will get hurt.This is a fact of life.Always remember this and it will happen less and with less hurt and pain.I sure wish that I was able to do such again.I do envy you and wish I was with you.Thanks for letting me tag along through your post.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee