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Discussion Starter #1
Good day to be on H-R as long as you had a GPS to navigate this morning. One good thing about fog, it usually means no wind!

I got about 200 threadfin on my first throw, and went fishing. Ended up with about 20 channel cats. We had 2 citation fish, 17.2# and 11.6#. We missed the current state record by only 1.3#. I mentioned in an earlier thread that I'm sure there is a record fish in H-R.

We fished up lake in anywhere from 2'-15'. I'm waiting on my fishing buddy to email the pics of his fish, which was his PB. We also saw a guy have to dive in after a rod that a catfish pulled from his rod holder...he didnt get it.
 

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Glad y'all had a good day! And the diver must not be rigged with Santee Special rod holders that would solve his winter swimming problem! Yea the state record channel has been all messes up due to a Flathead holding it for so long, it will be broken on a regular basis for quite a while now. What a shame on the fish and game department! I hope we all see our poles C'd up soon. Congrats on your catch and thanks for sharing!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I usually fish up lake adjacent to the river channel. I like to be able to spread my rods from about 2' out to about 15'.

Quint,
The diver had dirft masters. I'll stick with my Santee Specials.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Krowbar,

A citation fish is a fish that meets trophy size requirements, set by the Wildlife Resources Commission. They set length and weight standards for all species in the state. If you catch a fish meeting either the length or weight minimum, you can get a certificate from the Commission. Channel cats are 10# or 30". I have attached the link to the North Carolina Angler Recognition Program. Click to see all the minimum requirements.

http://www.ncwildlife.com/fs_index_03_fishing.htm

North Carolina Angler Recognition Program

The North Carolina Angler Recognition Program (NCARP) gives anglers an opportunity to catch and release trophy fish, yet have their fishing skills recognized by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. Anglers who catch large fish that exceed a certain size can apply to the Commission's Division of Inland Fisheries for NCARP recognition. In turn, the Division of Inland Fisheries sends these accomplished anglers NCARP certificates featuring color reproductions of fish artwork by renown wildlife artist and former Commission fisheries biologist Duane Raver. The NCARP program should not be confused with the State Record Fish program that recognizes anglers who catch a new state record fish (largest fish recorded for that species in the state). Instead, NCARP recognizes anglers who catch trophy-size fish that are not necessarily state records
 
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