Hey Diodeman...

Discussion in 'MISSOURI LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by Mr.T, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Haven't seen you on the board much lately but I know you're out there lurking!

    Tell us how the fishing is going these days and share some more wisdom! I know you've taught me a whole lot in the few posts you've made here and I appreciate it!

    Still fishing around G14? Doing any good lately?
     
  2. diodeman

    diodeman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Benton Co. Mo.
    Yes, I have been lurking but mostly at night on the rivers, or hunting boars by the light of the full moon in the headwaters regions of Truman Lake.

    Largest boar taken so far, 321lb. Eurasian, it tasted great!

    Big blues are numerous this year and have been easy to pattern. I have watched your e-mails and am glad to see you are catching on to patterns.

    Large flatheads are ready for nesting and once they come off the nest I am ready for them. I have 4 dozen live,fat shad in my bait tank and they are healthy and ready to catch flats.

    I have had excellent luck so far with the blues on frozen shad, that's right all you eople who are groaning at that, frozen shad. The blues love it, whole frozen shad.

    I have changed tactics this year and am heavily into learning patterns,Steve Brown does. He and I fish using the same tactics. Patterns.

    The shad are thicker this year than ever on the rivers, rather than on the large lake areas.

    The early warm weather chnaged the patterns.

    I suggest you all should buy the In-Fisherman magazine with Steve Browns article, he is correct about his info and I have been doing the same thing for 30 years. It's all about thinking patterns of fish behavior.

    diodeman
     

  3. copycat

    copycat New Member

    Messages:
    1,841
    State:
    New Jersey
    Sound like your in the know! Where can I find more info on fish patterns?

    Also, I wish we had boar here in N.J. I would love to bowhunt for them!
     
  4. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Good to hear from you, Diodeman!

    I feel like I know a ton more about catfishing than I did last year, thanks to folks like you, Bigmagic, Steve Brown and others who are willing to share their knowledge.

    Though I'm still skeptical about the frozen shad - the stuff I've been using is so fresh the chunks still twitch when you stick them on the hook!

    So are you saying the shad are farther upstream this year than normal? And the catfish have followed?
     
  5. diodeman

    diodeman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Benton Co. Mo.
    Due to the unusually warm March weather the threadfin & gizzard shad spawned early, thus blues were plentifull in late March because they do not mind the cooler waters.

    Think like bait, think small, where the food is, that's where the predators are.

    I remember your e-mail Mr. T speaking of the huge schools of shad swimming on Truman, during that time I could only have caught a blue by using grenades. During that huge shad schooling period we were catching stripers below the schools.

    Yet...for the three weeks following Mother's day, the blues had moved into the headwaters of Truman such as Sparrowfoot and farther up, our biggest blue was 78lbs, We were throwing back everything under 40lbs. and we caught many of those. On whole frozen shad! The warmer water temps had the headwaters fish really turned on.

    Get Steve Browns article from the 2006 Catfish In-sider magazine by In-fisherman. Read it - read it -read it- memorize it. His advice is the same thing I have been doing for 30+ years. He is thinking about patterns where the fish can hunt comfortably because that is where the food is.

    Where is the bait??????????? Think small and you'll find the predators. Get those maps that show underwaters strutures and the lay of the terrain;

    Terrain + current + bait = catfish Steve Browns article explains how to add those three parts of the equasion together to harvest fish. Before you go fishing sit down and look at a map. Check the current on the Corps of Engineers web site, is Truman Lake rising or falling? That creates current. That + the wind tells you where the plankton is being blown, the shad eat the plankton and the predators are not far behind. Read Steves article and you will learn tons of info., hell, read that whole magazine!

    The flatheads are prowling right now so their patterns are a bit erratic due to hunting for nesting sites. Last night threw back a; 17 - 27 - 31lb flatheads, all males. Kept 3 blues in 40lb. range and we had catfish, fried potatos & onions and cornbread for breakfast.

    The full moon will be out again tonight, I have a hog wallow that I have been watching and baiting with corn and 'Hog In Heat' scent, tonight I may get a chance to ambush them.

    My cat rods are all Ugly Sticks loaded with A-B 7000C3's + 100lb. test power pro braided line using #7 s/s Kahle hooiks.


    I use a Winchester model 1300 practical defender combat style shotgun loaded with 3" magnum rifled deer slugs, for back-up I carry a model 92FS Beretta semi-auto pistol loaded with 112 grain full metal jacket rounds and a Charter Arms .44 Magnum Bulldog revolver loaded with full metal jacket round nose bullets, in case the hogs get to close.

    As with fishing or hunting, I'm alone in the dark with predators.
     
  6. Fastman

    Fastman New Member

    Messages:
    75
    State:
    Arnold, Mo
    Diodeman:
    Do I understand you as saying you kept 40lb catfishs for eating? I was under the impression that cats bigger than 6-10lbs were not good eating....?
    Thanks
    Fastman
     
  7. diodeman

    diodeman New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    Benton Co. Mo.
    I eat only blues and flatheads, keeping fish past the prime breeding ages. As for size vs. taste (this should really get some responses), the 10 to 80lbers taste no different if prepared properly.

    I fillet the catfish down both sides, laying the fillet with skin down and slice the meat away from the outer skin.

    I soak the whole big fillets in cold ice cubed water over night to draw the blood from the flesh, plus the cold water turns the layer of gelatnous fat that is present on the meat into a clearish semi-rubbery substance that can be clearly seen on the surface of the fillet. Remove that clearish gelatinous substance because it doe not taste good when fried and will sour the rest of the fillet.

    Once you have removed all the visible gelatinous fat cut the fillet up in the sized pieces you will want to cook it in. Soak for several hous in fresh cold icy water once again and you will remove the last remaining blood and make visible any fat that has beem missed in the first trimming. Once again inspect each piece for any clear or cloudy looking pieces of gelatinous fat, then freeze in your preferred method for storage or consume fresh.

    Regardless of size of blues or flats if the subcutaneous layers of gelatinous fat are removed the meat should be fine unless the fish has been living in strongly polluted waters.

    It is a matter of personal preference, but I do not use salt or any other additives in the water that I soak the fish in.

    I bet this gets lots of responses, pro's & cons.
     
  8. Burwell40

    Burwell40 New Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Iowa
    Diodeman,

    I asssume you were still fishing for the flats. Were you still fishing early with the frozen or drifting?

    You're not breaking any laws by eating the monsters. You're just breaking my heart cause I will never get to catch them.