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Eric from Indianapolis
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I was fishing the Ohio River, just up from Brandenburg, Kentucky this past Saturday. A storm was moving in and we hunkered in to ride through it. A boat that had recently passed me stopped in the middle of the river about half a mile ahead. The storm had moved in and it was raining hard with no shortage of lighting which is always a bad thing in an aluminum boat.
As I passed the boat, I saw a guy standing and waving me down. I stopped, he told me he ran out of gas. He has his wife and two kids in the boat, all soaked of course. Found me rope and hooked us up and away we went. It was about 5 miles to the Brandenburg boat launch, and with my small 40hp motor, we weren't breaking and speed records. So it took a while to get them to safety.
Eventually I get him to the dock. He unties my rope from his boat, throws it toward me, and starts talking to his buddy on the dock who had brought a tank of gas. I say "good luck to you all", and the guy doesn't say a word or look my way. So I pulled away and went on to my ramp on the Indiana side, without as much as a "Thank you".
It kinda blew my mind that someone could be so ungrateful. Had to share this with someone.
No matter the case, I'd never leave a guy stranded on the water with his family in a storm. Ungrateful or grateful.
 

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Us boaters can be a strange lot, while sitting still on the water for whatever reason I have had a much bigger percentage of folks pull up and ask if I was OK than I have ever had while sitting along the side of the highway in a vehicle. Having said that I speculate some of those same folks who wouldn't even consider not stopping and checking on a boat that appeared to be having trouble would think nothing of coming by at an unnecessarily close distance producing a huge wake while I was anchored up fishing.
I don't know what the guy you helped deal is but no one that has ever offered to help me left without hearing thanks for asking and no one I have ever accepted help from ever left without being asked what do I owe you for your help. Just common curtesy IMO.
 

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Winston, Indiana
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Eric,
While there may be mitigating circumstances, your actions say a lot about you and his actions say a lot about him.
I’ll always stop and offer help without any expectations of reward but a simple thank you for help offered or given goes a long way. I’ve only towed in two boats in my time on the water and both times the folks were very appreciative.
I guess some people are just different!

…W
 

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I guess I am getting grumpy like in Grumpy Old Men, in my older years. But I think I would have told him and the folks he was with that he was welcome and added “whether he appreciated the tow in or not“. Some of the younger folks need their nose rubbed in (it) once in a while. Just like for Forest Gump, (it) means the same as “it 💩 happens”.

tight lines
 

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Imma thinking that on the way to the water the wife told him to stop and get gas for the boat and being a wise and seasoned captain of all things nautical and his vessel he replied “shut yer trap sea hag”. So when that motor died he was overcome with a bad case of the “Yes dear. I’m sorry honey, you were right” remorse and embarrassment. Knowing that momma’s foot will get kicked even higher up his backside as the wife and kids get colder and wetter he was just wanting to eat a snickers and stay at a Holiday Inn Express.
 

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I was fishing the Ohio River, just up from Brandenburg, Kentucky this past Saturday. A storm was moving in and we hunkered in to ride through it. A boat that had recently passed me stopped in the middle of the river about half a mile ahead. The storm had moved in and it was raining hard with no shortage of lighting which is always a bad thing in an aluminum boat.
As I passed the boat, I saw a guy standing and waving me down. I stopped, he told me he ran out of gas. He has his wife and two kids in the boat, all soaked of course. Found me rope and hooked us up and away we went. It was about 5 miles to the Brandenburg boat launch, and with my small 40hp motor, we weren't breaking and speed records. So it took a while to get them to safety.
Eventually I get him to the dock. He unties my rope from his boat, throws it toward me, and starts talking to his buddy on the dock who had brought a tank of gas. I say "good luck to you all", and the guy doesn't say a word or look my way. So I pulled away and went on to my ramp on the Indiana side, without as much as a "Thank you".
It kinda blew my mind that someone could be so ungrateful. Had to share this with someone.
No matter the case, I'd never leave a guy stranded on the water with his family in a storm. Ungrateful or grateful.
I was in the Coast Guard so I saw that more often then you'd think. I think some of it is embarrassment. The guy had to be rescued in front of his wife and kids. Can you imagine HIS ride home? If it means anything, I thank you. Do good because it's the right thing to do. Sometimes, that's all the reward we get.
 

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I was fishing a Tournament in deep winter years ago and the wind was howling and throwing big waves directly towards the ramp everyone was launching from (Alcoa ramp: Badin Lake). As I was watching the teams launch their boats, 1 guy launched a fiberglass boat off his trailer and then proceeded to pull up and into the parking area, while his partner in the boat started trying to crank the boat's motor, it didn't crank right away and the waves quickly thew his boat up onto the concrete boat ramp. The receding wave would wash it down the concrete and the next wave would again throw it further up. The fiberglass boat hull screeching the whole time. I jumped in my boat roped to the dock, started it up and pulled in front of the ramp. I threw him a rope attached to my rear cleat and said tie off and I would pull him off concrete ramp. He tied off to his front right anchor cleat and I started pulling him off and his boat darted to his left and hit another boat (superficial damage).

So, if you try to tow someone, tie to the eyebolt on the very center front of the towed boat (where you crank the boat onto your trailer). If you tie off to something on the side their boat will not go straight. This incident happened at night, hectic with all the boats trying to get launched for the upcoming tournament, wind and waves causing all kinds of problems launching and trying to tie off somewhere, and I didn't realize how they were tying off until I got them off the concrete. lesson learned!
 
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