Help with sinkers

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by ravenloft420, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    as alot of you know Im new to the river fishing scene. I have a few questions about sinkers for you master catfishers.

    1. what type (shape) are the best sinker for medium/heavy current.

    2.how big should they be?

    3.exactly how do I make a carolina rig?

    4.what are tire weights?? I am going to buy a sinker mold and have heard that tire weights are good and cheap or free. are they something I can get at a junkyard?

    5.hahaha you guys are great and I look foward to any and all advice.
     
  2. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Flat no rolls if ya are gonna use a carolina rig. Stock up on 3 to 6 ounce ones. Carolina rig is as follows. Put the no roll sinker on your main line, then a bead or piece of rubber tubing not to fat. Tie on your swivel. Tie your leader with the hook to the swivel. Bingo! A carolina rig is born. Bait hook and catch fish. LOL!
     

  3. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    hey thanks brother. are there alot of other types of rigs? what do you prefer?
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Flat sinkers hold better in current. They may slide along the bottom, but just a small mud crease will allow them to hold. Sinkers of this type are the no-roll, flat-bank, no-snag, and river sinkers. You may also include a pyramid sinker in this classification although it is not flat. Round sinkers, such as egg sinkers, bank sinkers, bell sinkers, will generally roll in current - and are not favored by fishermen. Another sinker used in current is a claw sinker... this is shaped like a bank sinker but has six or eight wire prongs which stick out and hook on obstructions. When you pull on the line, the wire prong may straighten out allowing you to retrieve your rig.

    The amount of weight you want to use depends entirely upon the strength of the current and composition of the bottom. If it is rocky, you are going to loose rigs... you may want to use the no-snags in this case. They plane up off the bottom when retrieved which may allow you to get your line in without snagging.

    Wheel weights are a good source of lead for sinkers. You may get them at salvage yards, tire shops, or on the street. Insure you are in a well ventilated area when you melt them. This can be done with an electric hot plate, a side burner from you bar-b-que grill, your kitchen stove (not recommended) or though a commercial lead melting pot. These pots run from about $30.00 to $80.00. oh, yes, you can also get lead at metal recyclers in your neighborhood.

    You may want to visit our library located at the below link for more information on making sinkers. Please pay particular attention to the safety features. Here is the link... I'd recommend you scroll down the page to see what information is available.

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38576
     
  5. catchaser19

    catchaser19 New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    UTAH
    Another popular river rig is the three way. To make one you can go two ways, first you can get two barrel swivels. slide one swivel up the main line then put a bead on your main line then tie another swivel on like a carolina rig to hold it all together this swivel has aleader and hook. The one you slid up your line you tie a leader on that one too, and it is usually a good idea to make the sinker leader lighter then your main line so if your sinker hangs it will break and save the rest of the rig. The other and sometimes easier way to make a three way rig is to buy the actual three way swivels. First you tie your main line to one eye then your sinker dropper to the other then the business end on the other. I prefer the first one mentioned because you can use higher quality ball bearing swivels. It also has all the advantages of a carolina rig the weight will sit still as the catfish runs off so he wont feel the weight:wink: hope this helps and good luck
     
  6. catfishbill33

    catfishbill33 New Member

    Messages:
    356
    State:
    Clarksville, TN
    George you are ok.I couldn have said it better
    thanks
     
  7. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    These guys pretty well covered the subject but you might find some more information in the library.
     
  8. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    I think bank sinkers work better from a boat in current. from the bank, the flat sinkers can't be beat. they hold your bait down without rolling. but, when fishing from a boat, the flat sinkers will want to "plane" as the current pulls away from you lifting it off the bottom. the current seems to go around the bank sinker better. basically, what that means to me is since, i like to fish in flooded water. and i can hold a bait down with less weight using a bank sinker, than a no-roll.
     
  9. alton

    alton New Member

    Messages:
    1,045
    State:
    Illinois
    I would use 6oz flat bank no rolls for fishing the current. I prefer to always use a sinker slide which I tie the sinker to with a lighter mono, so when the snag comes, all you loose is the weight. Good luck.