Help needed.Buying Info.Drill press.Bench top type.

Discussion in 'Other Repairs' started by peewee williams, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I am helping pick out a new Drill press,Bench type with my son.No space for floor which I like best for ALL uses.I am not familiar with the ones for sale today and he is not either,nor has he used one.Has anyone bought or know anyone who has bought one in the $200.00 range lately?

    Have been looking on line from Craftsman 12" model.#21914 to Harbor Freight 13 7/8 swing model. #38142-7VGA.It will be used for occasional general repair and building around the home.Hobby-10" types are a little too small.

    Delta used to be good but a lot of complaints lately from old satisfied Delta customers about Delta now junk.

    Folks just don't sell the old ones used unless they are wore slap out

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  2. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    PeeWee, look up Grizzly tools.
    Have them send you a free master catalogue or just use the online catalogue.
    If I wasnt going to make a living with it I'd probally go Grizzly quicker then most others.
    Grizzly, has about 3 levels of quality in most of their shop tools.
    Of course in some tools like their milling machines, I'd keep turning the page.:smile2:

    I'm a Delta fan myself but all my Delta is older.
    I still like a Delta table saw.

    I do have a neat one though.
    I have a Shopsmith Mark5.
    I need to sell that thing one day.
     

  3. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I picked one up at Menards.
    Nothin expensive. Its a tabletop and I wish I'd have gotten a floor model.
    I got the larger of the 2 tabletops. it does most of the stuff I want.
    If you have the money for a Craftsman I'd get that one. But like I said this one does all the stuff I need.
     
  4. Ketch

    Ketch New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    Minnesota
    My wife, bless her soul bought me a benchtop drill press for Christmas. Unfortunately, she shope by price first. She bought me the Tool Shop one at Menards, not the cheapest smallest one, the next size up. Laser sight, flex light built in, all the bells and whistles. Too bad when I am making sawdust I don't have any need for bells and whistles. The laser light moves incredibly and the flexlight can't hold itself up anymore. Also, there is a noticeable amount of movement in the depth stops, and this makes consistant depth holes near impossible without taping your drill bits (kinda defeats the purpose)

    I now have a 90 lb table weight in my shop. It won't handle a 1" forstner bit, so its kinda useless to me. I have never told my wife how much I hate this tool since it would break her heart. I have now decided to NOT put any tools on my Christmas list anymore. That way I get what I want.

    I agree with Mark on Grizzly. The make some of the best affordable tools on the market. I wouldn't buy a tablesaw from them, but I would buy a drill press from them.

    One thing many people don't consider when buying a drill press is what they are going to use it for.

    Check to see if the quill travel is enough for what you need?
    If you are drilling a lot of holes of consistant depths, check to see how solid the stops are and how easily they are changed.
    Make sure the benchtop is of adequate size.
    What are you going to be drilling? If you use larger forstner bits, realize how important the extra power is. When using the cheapy I got from Menards, I can barely use forstner bits.
    How much are you going to use this press? If you aren't going to use it much, you may be well off getting an affordable one. If you drill a lot of holes, don't be thrifty on this item, you'll regret it.

    I do know guys who are very happy with their Ryobi's and Grizzly's but I wouldn't recommend the Tool Shop (or whatever Menards generic brand is).
     
  5. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    I have an older bench top Craftsman I built a table for. I got it at an auction years ago , I gave 45 for it 25 years ago. It seems to me that all the older tools, even the older cheap tools were built better than the new ones today. If a person wants to buy good American Made, non breakable tools, you have to get them at an auction.

    An example is, my dad in 1946 bought a cheap Montgomery Wards cement mixer, NEW. He used it all his life. That mixer did his basement, driveway, uncles basement , countless garage floors, etc. My dad passed away in 1995 and I had borrowed it maybe 10 years before he died, he was old and did not ask for it back. Well I have used that critter to pour yards of retaining walls, steps, porches, etc. The darn thing is handy as it is like haveing an extra man that does not get tired. I can still use it today, and will this summer.

    The only thing I have done to it was weld lifting lugs on it to make it easier to move. I don't think the new good quality mixers today are as heavy duty as that cheap old Montgomery Wards mixer.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    :big_smile:
     
  6. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    I'm with Jim, hard to beat Craftsman.
    I've got a Craftsman standing drill press that I've had almost 35 years.. never a problem.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Sadly, Craftsman isn't nowhere close to what it was even 10 years ago.
    My Craftsman free standing drill press came with 3/4" plastic balls on the handle. First thing I had to do is weld some nuts on 1-1/4" ball bearings and screw them on to the handle spokes. The cast table is pretty mickey mouse. No doubt to be easily broken.
    My 6 year old Craftsman is probally a 10th the drill press as your 35 year old Craftsman. I would trade mine for yours and pay you on top of the trade in a heartbeat.
    That drill press is probally the last Craftsman power tool I'll own.
    I was looking at free standing tablesaws a few years ago. I spent less then 2 minutes in Sears looking. There might have been a day but its not today.
     
  8. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Thats the sad thing about todays tools. My drill press was 20 to 30 years old when I bought it at auction. The only way to get something good without spending an arm and a leg, is going to estate sales. Old tools were made better.
     
  9. Coyote1

    Coyote1 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Missouri
    Brother Peewee;
    I'm going to go with the recommendation that MarkJ made about getting one from Grizzly! I've bought several items from that company and will be buying my Vertical Mill and Metal Lathe from them.
    They have some Drill Presses that will fit your budget and they DO stand behind their products too! I am planning on getting my Drill Press from them in a couple of months too.
    Call this number for a FREE 698 page 2008 Catalog.
    1-800-523-4777 24 hours a day. They will be GLAD to rush one to you!
    IF you want to look early their website is:
    http://www.grizzly.com
    Hope this helps you out Brother. :wink::big_smile:
    Holler if your need any further help and I will be glad to do what I can do for ya. Of course that goes for any of us BOC types too!:wink:
    Cordially,
    Coyote1
    [[[[[ End of Post ]]]]]
     
  10. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I used industrial drill presses for in my job for almost 40 years.I don't get out much so I can't look around.My son operates a Crane and is not familiar with them.From everything that I hear,most are junk anymore.A lot of folks are disappointed who bought the new Delta,Craftsman,Grizzly,and on and on.I like the floor models,but a place to put one is a problem.

    Thanks everyone for the response's.Please keep them coming if you hear or find out anything more.Ain't in a big hurry so we are trying to learn all we can before hand.All knowledge helps!

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  11. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Bought Harbor Freight Central Machinery Model 38142 Bench heavy duty drill press for $159.99 on sale at their Savannah store.115 volt 3/4 HP,8 amp. motor.16 speed,240-3600 RPM.MT2 Spindle and 7/64-5/8 keyed chuck.I have measured the swing at 13 1/2 inches(claimed 13 7/8''),spindle stroke at 3 1/8 inches(I wish it was more).

    I put my Starrett dial indicator on the raised spindle and could barely detect movement.The same for extended spindle.Way less than .001"!With the spindle fully extended,I got the same!I put the chuck on,the same!I inserted a 1/2 in.long drill bit and put the dial on the shank of the drill bit.I got dead on .001" run out.This movement was on 1/4 of the bits circumference,so it may well and most likely have been the bit.I could not believe what I got and repeatedly set up again and again to get a triple check each time.The precision of the spindle on this cheap drill press is unbelievable.The depth stop seems to be good and accurate,though it is "exactly" 1/16" off of the given reading all of the way through the stroke of the spindle.We can live with that.I can hardly believe that We got the precision machine we got.Very few industrial drill presses do any better new.It is better than the ones that I have checked that cost thousands of dollars years ago.It must have been made by some very good precision equipment with no wear and good machinist.Now if it will just retain good accuracy with time and wear.Pushing and pulling very hard (for me now) I could force .017" max total side to side with the spindle extended fully and the reading 3 inches out on the drill bit.

    The head can be rotated around the column 360 degrees if you wish.16 inches between lowest table setting and chuck tip.

    The round 360 degree rotating & tilting table measures 11 1/2 inches with six 3" slots.Each starts at 1" from the outer edge and runs till within 1 3/8" of the 1" center hole in the table.The slots and center hole go all of the way through.I just slid a 5/8 inch bolt in the slots to check their width.The nice thing is that you can use standard SAE or Metric bolts,nuts and washers of your choice to hold down your work.This is much cheaper than the commonly used "T" bolts that must be the correct size.The table also rotates 360 all of the way around the column.The base slots also take 5/8" bolts.The table is not polished and the machining marks are coarse enough to grab at my finger nails.As it is going to be mostly used for wood,a few coats of Turtle wax will take care of that.

    If they are all like this,they are well worth the money IF the rest is good and they hold up.

    I ran the motor free for a hour to break it in at no load.Some vibration.Not bad,but never good in my opinion.I will do the same at different speeds after my son comes and lifts the head on the column as I am just cleaning,waxing,greasing and checking it out.

    A floor model would have been nice but this is hopefully going to be put on a mobile base on wheels that will fold up out of the way and leave a 4 foot square flat base,yet be able to go through standard interior doors when mobile.

    I put the belts on the head and ran it for two hours.I then broke out the dial indicator and rechecked the run out.Nothing has changed.To good to be true.I am looking for it to blow up or lightning to strike!:amazed:

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  12. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I noticed that this drill press spindle end/opening for drill insertion is 27 1/2" off of the floor and the belt speed changing lid when opened is 39 1/2" off of the floor with a very sturdy base.It would be a great floor press for the wheelchair bound or someone sitting down to operate it.

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  13. cathooked

    cathooked New Member

    Messages:
    437
    State:
    north carolina
    grizzly cataloge came last week at my house,and i could go broke lookin through that book,i want a metal band saw just got save some cabbage for one,but i think grizzly will get my business they got some good deals.need to check them out..
     
  14. cathooked

    cathooked New Member

    Messages:
    437
    State:
    north carolina
    pee-wee i shop at harbor freight here in north carolina,they have good stuff and bad stuff,but i try to stay away from there cause i always spend tooo much money there,gittin tired of the wife reamin me out when i get home from there,lol..their bench drill presses are pretty good just have to have sharp bits,
     
  15. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    The bad thing about Grizzly in my area is the shipping cost now on heavy stuff.I like the stuff but not the additional shipping cost.There is no way they can compete with a Harbor freight 35 miles away.Harbor Freight charges catalog prices at the store if you take a copy of it in with you.Great deal.Now if it was reversed,Grizzly would most likely be the best.

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  16. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Grizzly has some not so great stuff too.
    They kinda off throw out 3-5 models of the same tool so you have a choice of quality versus funds.

    I kind of wondered about Grizzly tools for a long time until I met a man that has a cabinet shop full of them. Thousands of dollars in Grizzly.
    He said he has never had a problem and they make him a good living.
    Some those tools are made in China but typically the more expensive models are Japanese according to him and they meet ISO standards.

    No doubt there are better tools but how much better for the money difference?
    Now folks get real picky about tablesaws and thats understandable. Its not so much the saw itself as it is the fence system.

    Glad your deal worked out for your needs Peewee.