Help making a Shad tank

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by Salmonid, Dec 25, 2007.

  1. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Ok folks, I need some help here, I have access to several clean white plastic 55 gallon drums ( had strawberry preserves in them) and Im planning on making some shad tanks out of them, ( circular to help them stay alive) I think I have everything worked out, will use 1" plastic hoses to pump water in from overboard and a filtered outlet to run overflow back off the boat. When I run, Ill put both hoses back inside the tank and it will self circulate at that time, then when I get where I am going, Ill put both hoses overboard and it will again circulate fresh river water back into the tank. Make sense???
    My main question is how high should I cut the barrels since shad and bluegills can be quite the jumpers. Im thinking rather too tall then not tall enough, so Im thinking maybe 24 or 28", with my over flow about 16" or 18" up.

    Any thoughts on this??

    I know Mellon/Riverking will want one when I figure out how to make them. I may have some more barrels available (cheap) to anyone in SW Ohio.

    Salmonid
     
  2. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Mark,

    Check this out: http://www.ngstripers.org/SaltwaterLivewell.pdf

    It's easy as pie to keep Bluegills alive, but I have a hard time keeping Shad alive. I've heard many people say to NOT include Bluegills and the such in the same tank as Shad. I've got most of the parts ready, so where's my tank? :0a28: :0a1:
     

  3. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    You can figure about 1 shad per gallon Mark so the taller the better I would think. If you put the overflow that low it wont hold much. Your probably going to need a lid to keep the water in while trailering and motoring so I would put the over flow way up toward the top.
    I would put a filtration system at the top that that sucks water from the bottom and runs back into the tank. You can still use the overflow if you need to add water. If your keeping shad the filter is going to be a must, simply adding and taking water out might work some but you wont be getting rid of there scales they loose at the bottom of the tank with just a overflow.
     
  4. coondog east fork

    coondog east fork New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    IND
    I saw a nice one that guy made with 55 gl drums in the library
     
  5. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Mark, heres a quick rundown of my tank. Its fairly small, about 4 foot tall, and not as wide as a 55 gallon drum, I had a smaller boat that I used it on so I made it smaller. Basically I have 2 pumps, 1 750gph, and 1 500gph. The 750 I use primarily for the aerator spray, that goes up the side, and the 500 I use strickly for current, I have a hose that goes out and back into the barrel, and a 90 degree angle piece of pvc that is pointed to make the water flow like a whirlpool, this keeps the bait swimming. I also have a circular piece of stainless steel with 3 inch legs on the bottom, that basically cover the pumps on the bottom to prevent the shad from getting down and there and getting caught in them, also keep some of the scales out of the pumps since it is basically a screen. Also have another filter attached to the inlet of the 750 to keep the pumps somewhat clear. I just use shad keeper, and alternate frozen 2 liter bottles to keep tempature down. I will be making a new one in a few weeks with a 55 gallon drum, complete with insulation on the outside. I like the idea of circulating fresh river water, but haven't taken it that far yet. This tank keeps shad alive all night long.
     

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  6. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    a couple more pics, hope this helps a little:wink:
     

    Attached Files:

  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    What worked for me was cutting the barrel in two about 1/3 of the way down from the top, then cutting vertical slits in the side of the top piece and bending them out just a little, so that I could easily slide the top part down over the bottom part of the barrel, creating a shorter barrel. You can use a jigsaw to cut a rectangle of any size desired in the top; attach a couple of brass hinges and a latch of some kind, and you're in business. Just be sure to measure your bait net, then give yourself a little extra space when you cut your hole in the top. If you do screw up and cut it too small, recut it larger, then cut a piece of wood to fit over the hole.
     
  8. yeppa

    yeppa New Member

    Messages:
    636
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas
    Hope ya' got a big boat buddy. 55 gal. of water will weigh over 400 pounds. Keep it safe.
     
  9. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Yeah thats what I was thinking myself.. If I was gonna attemp a 55 on a boat I would have to cut it in half, have done that before. A full on 55gallon tank would have to be in the back of the truck for bank fishing.:cool2: