Help!, Losing Jugs

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by cechandler, Jun 15, 2008.

  1. cechandler

    cechandler New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Georgia
    :angry:
    On a recent trip I had an anchored jug bobbing up and down as I approached it. When my boat came near the jug went under and disappeared toward the channel.. I never saw that one again. The set was on a 21 foot deep shelf near a 45 foot deep channel. The previous day I caught a 16 pound blue, in the channel 200 yards from the set! I lost several more jugs during the 4 day trip, presumably carried away by big cats. All were anchored with a 2 pound weight.

    Does anyone know how I can retain the jugs and the fish on my next trip (planned soon)?

    I’m considering 60 feet of line on each jug. If the jug would flag and then allow the line to deploy the jug would remain on top when the fish pulled the weight into the channel.. Is there a way to do this?

    Thanks in advance for your help.
     
  2. sarg

    sarg New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Texas
    Charles
    I had the same problem on martin creek here in Tx. So I set my main line 5 feet deeper that the the depth of the water.

    I was fishing off a ledge it drop from 15 feet to 40 foot depth. The cats would come out of the deep water at night to feed and then when hook the
    cats headed bach to the security of the deep water:0a26:

    sarg
     

  3. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

    Messages:
    1,602
    State:
    Texas
    What are you useing for jugs?
     
  4. cechandler

    cechandler New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Georgia
    Patterned after the design posted here by Ben Luna. 18 inch capped pvc with 1/2 x 6 inch rebar inside with 12 inches of 2 3/4 pool noodle outside. They work great except for the big cats taking them away.
     
  5. cechandler

    cechandler New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Georgia
    Patterned after the design posted here by Ben Luna. 18 inch capped pvc with 1/2 x 6 inch rebar inside with 12 inches of 2 3/4 pool noodle outside. They work great except for the big cats taking them away.
     
  6. ersel

    ersel New Member

    Messages:
    1,164
    State:
    Haughton Louisiana
    Leave the rebar out and go with a lighter weight if you can if not double up on you jugs
     
  7. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Make sure your jug can float any weight you have attached. A 2 pound weight would need about a gallon milk jug for the float. Well maybe not that much, as a gallon of water weighs 8 pounds , so a half gallon jug would even work.

    Then no mater where Old Mr. Wisker's decides to go, your jug will be above him.
     
  8. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I made an extension for my flagging jugs. You can use one whenever your in deeper water than the main line on your jug. I mark the line length on the pvc cap to tell how much line is on the jug. Say it has 35 feet of line, but the water depth is50 feet. I just plug an extension in the rear of the jug with an additional 20 foot of line on it. I pulled the pvc pipe into the noodle about 1 1/2 to 2 inches to have room for the bottles lid. The may take the noodle down, but the small pop bottle will come loose due to water pressure/friction and give me an idea where the jug is at. LOL
     

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  9. tufffish

    tufffish New Member

    Messages:
    1,196
    State:
    Texas
    make sure the jug is big enough to hold the weight up on it's own or you will loose some. big jugs are a pain to store and carry around in the boat, but will not stay under.
     
  10. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i like the idea of the jug for the jug! :wink:
     
  11. cechandler

    cechandler New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Georgia
    Neat setup Lawrence. Thanks for the info & pic. I'll make a couple and give them a try, What I really had in mind was a way to attach a 60 foot line to the jug (with 18 to 24 inches of slack to prevent false flagging) in such a way the jug would tip & flag & then release the remainder of the line, when the fish took it. The jug would then remain on the surface even when the cat took the weight to the bottom of the nearby 50 foot channel. Also the 2 pound weight would be more difficult for a big cat to drag around if it remained on the bottom instead of suspending below the jug. Perhaps this just isn't possible, but one can dream!!!

    :roll_eyes:Thanks to each of you for your comments and suggestions.
     
  12. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Thats what 90 hp Mercs are for, chase those jugs. LOL I try to check mine every couple hours they are out.
     
  13. cechandler

    cechandler New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Georgia
    I'm either broke or stingy, I can't stand the fuel overhead. My 9 h.p. Yahama 4 stroke uses about 5 gallons a week when I use it a lot. Maybe I could catch up with most of them jugs with it but I'm either old or lazy (perhaps both) and can't stay with 'em. LOL
     
  14. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    The rough rule of thumb I use for determining the maximum weight of an anchor for a jug is that the jug be capable of supporting at least twice the weight of the anchor. My 2-liter jugs will support 4#, so the maximum size anchor I will use with them is 2#. This insures that when a big fish pulls the anchor into deeper water, the jug will continue to float, rather than sinking into the depths. The alternative is to use a weight so heavy that a big fish can't drag it into deeper water. Seems to me that that would require something at least as heavy as a full sized concrete block. That's just too heavy a weight to be pulling in, unless you've got some kind of power winch to do the job. Of course, you'd be winching in the fish as well, eliminating most of the sport. Going to a half-gallon, or better yet, a gallon sized jug would allow you to use a decent sized weight while still maintaining the jug's ability to float the weight.
    Here are some figures you might find helpful in picking or designing a jug: a 2-liter jug is 4" in diameter and 10" long. You could go to a jug that's 4" in diameter and 2' long and have approximately 9 1/2 # of floatation.
    If you're wanting to stay with foam/pvc, here's a possibility: take a 2' length of 1" pvc, insert the rebar and rig as you normally would for a jug. Attach three 2' pieces of foam noodle around the piece of pvc for added diameter and floatation. If there's a problem with the weight of the rebar not being enough to keep the jug flagged, try extending the bottom end of the pvc 12"-18". This will give added leverage, making it easier for the fish to tip the jug and for the rebar to keep the jug in the flagged position.
     
  15. fugeman

    fugeman New Member

    Messages:
    24
    State:
    ALABAMA
    I use 1 gallon oil or antifreeze jugs. I try to use the more square ones since they seem to store and just don't roll off line in the water. I've seen 30 to 40 lb. cats pull these under but not for very long. A bigger jug may be your answer.
     
  16. lance

    lance New Member

    Messages:
    2,658
    State:
    kentucky
    In ky we don't have to anchor jugs . They can get lost if you don't stay with them !
     
  17. germanmudfish

    germanmudfish New Member

    Messages:
    492
    State:
    Gray, GA
    roll your line on the barbell with a loop pulled through a couple of rounds of line. When whiskers grabs and runs, the line will roll off. You could put as much line as you want on the barbell and always be able to trace the cat down.:wink:
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Maybe it's just me, but I've only been able to use such a method in very calm water; anywhere there's waves, they jerk line loose with every wave or two, eventually unwinding every bit of the line.
    IMO, you've got two choices: you can use a weight so heavy a fish can't drag it to deeper water; or, you can use a weight/jug combo that floats in deeper water. I mean that you use a jug that's big enough to float your weight, or a weight small enough that it won't sink your jug. Personally, I like to keep a 2 to 1 ratio---I want the jug to be able to float twice as much as my weight. My 2-liter jugs will float about 4#, so I use a 2# weight on my anchored jugs.
     
  19. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    you guys ever think about using rubber bands. we used to use longer main lines than the depth of water we were fishing. let out the desired amount of drop and tie it off with small rubber bands. when pulled under the rubber band slips off and lets out the rest of the line.
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Maybe something like this would work. Go ahead and attach your regular sized jug to your jugline. Take another jug with 60' of line kept on it with a rubber band and attach the line to the first jug. When it's calm, your line on the second jug won't unwrap unless a fish carries the weight out into deeper water; if big waves should cause the line to unwrap from the second jug, it won't affect your jugline.