Help! How to reconnect cut cord that's 110V.

Discussion in 'Other Repairs' started by baptistpreach, Dec 13, 2008.

  1. baptistpreach

    baptistpreach New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Oklahoma!
    I had someone give me an older electric knife that would make a great backup for me or a pinch hitter when my main one gets hot from cleaning a lot of fish, of course the only thing wrong with it was that he had accidentally cut off the cord and plug. What's the safest way to reconnect it? Wire nuts? Heat shrink tubing? Electric tape? I just dunno and was hoping for some help

    Thanks
     
  2. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    I would install a new plug on the remaining cord, or a new cord if possible. splicing an appliance cord is asking for disaster to strike.
     

  3. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    REPLACE THE CORD. Safer that way. Can't be that hard to do.
     
  4. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    I'll splice one in a heartbeat. Wire connectors and shrink wrap should suffice quite nicely.
    BB in SC
     
  5. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    How much cord do you have remaining on the knife? If there is enough left, you may be able to get a male connector from the hardware store and install; if not, then I would try to splice it, as Bill said, taking care to use shrink connectors, liquid electrical tape, etc. I always use a GFCI receptacle with mine anyway.
     
  6. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    Repairing or replacing the cord would for me, depend on how much cord I had left. If he just cut the plug off I would go to the hardware store and get a plug and put it on. If he cut it in the middle or left not enough cord to work with if you simply put a plug on it I would get a new cord and replace it. If you splice it and happen to get it wet your asking for trouble. All you have to do is carefully open the housing and get a soldering iron and heat the solder where the power cord is connected and pull the cord off the posts. Then attach the new cord and resolder into place and then replace the housing.
     
  7. joesf

    joesf New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Bloomington IL
    Electric Knife, fish, and water all go to gether in my book there fore the only way to go would be new wire!!!
     
  8. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    I'd slip some heat shrink tubing over the wires , I piece for each wire, then solder the wires together on each side, slip the heat shrink over and shrink it,, I'd also, have a larger piece of heat shrink tubing slipped on that would cover the repair and the primary heat shrink tubing... cover the whole repair.

    That's how I do it on motorcycles, and they have to work in all elements...
     
  9. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

    Messages:
    4,944
    State:
    Nashville Il.
    if you are going to splice it together cut one wire a couple inches shorter then the other so each connection area is not across from each other . solder them together heat shrink over them and tape it if you wish . Also you might try getting an old hair dryer cord that has the plug that will kick off if wet or shorted etc.
     
  10. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    If you got enough cord just put a male end on it and use an extension cord to get enough length to work with.
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I'll splice a cord without any hesitation, unless we're talking about only a few inches of cord that's not worth trying to save. For total protection against moisture, I use wire nuts, making sure that the bare wire is well up inside the wire nuts; then I use my hot glue gun to fill up the wire nut with glue. This not only keeps everything together, but encases it all in a waterproof covering. To keep the nuts from catching on stuff, I'll often wrap it all with either electrician's tape or duct tape to make it all relatively smooth. That way, all that shows is a bulge on the cord.
     
  12. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Liquid insulation properly applied by painting,spraying on or poured into forms has been used for high to low voltage waterproof wire connections for many years now.It has held in soil to deep into the ocean trench's.

    NOW,any device should have proper protection whether used around moisture or not.Cutting a cord can kill you while you are standing on 50 feet of insulation without proper protection.In accidents breaking lines,"Any" line can instantly become hot for a split second.I almost lost my son when he was 7 due to such a freak accident!A ground suddenly became a high voltage hot wire.Only proper placement of or a armored cord will prevent cutting a line.

    You can often make armor for cords from old wire inserted hose.You can wash out old sections of hydraulic hose for this.You cannot have the wire in the hose abrading the cord.The wire in the hose needs to be grounded.Stiffness and weight is the problem with armored hoses.ANY hose slipped over a wire is more protection than nothing!Split hard plastic wire guards are cheap and a lot better than nothing!

    I have twice seen approved and checked "Ground Fault" devices that failed.Nothing is perfect.A wise person lives by "Overkill" when it comes to safety.
     
  13. TheRiverRat

    TheRiverRat New Member

    Messages:
    994
    State:
    Hamilton,Ohio
    good luck lol
     
  14. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I'll splice a cord PROVIDED it is not something in my home or something that remains plugged in.
    Done electrical work for too many years and seen what can and does happen to the weakest link (splice) in a wire.
    The UL listing is gone when you splice the cord. No big deal unless you need it.

    GFI's going bad. It happens. That's why there is a test button on them BUT I've seen many installed by people that thought they knew what they were doing wire them up so the outlet(s) worked but there was no protection because in their wiring they bypassed it. Not difficult to do on a GFCI receptacle.

    Pick your wiring jobs carefully. Don't get in over your head.
    Is a 20 dollar toaster worth my house and my family? Absolutely not.
    Is a jury rigged power tool worth losing my life over when it electricutes me because I was too cheap to have it professionally repared or replaced?
    Absolutely not.

    I'm not opposed to fixing anything but when it comes to electrical you have to know that electricity is invisible.
    If you cant do it right for the sake of anyone that cares about you, can it and spend 25 bucks.

    I think more of you then to sit on a message board and try to tell you how to splice the cord on a cord connected device. Replace the whole cord or chunk it.
     
  15. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I am not trying to offend anyone with this post but I have seen what can happen when this stuff goes wrong.
    First: WIRE NUTS ARE NOT MEANT FOR ANYTHING BUT ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS THAT ARE SECURED IN A METALIC RACEWAY ENCLOSURE THAT IS NOT SUBJECT TO MOVEMENT AND ARE MADE FOR SOLID WIRE, NOT STRANDED!!!!!!!
    I would not put much faith in anyone that uses them in any other application as it WILL fail! PERIOD!
    Second: Replace the cord if it is not long enough to put a replacement end on it.
    IF and I MEAN IF, for some reason you cannot get the part and need to splice it use the proper equipment. Butt Splice connectors with heat shrink that is made on them. These have a glue in them that seals them when they are heated to keep water out and for stress relief.
    These are made for automotive applications and where vibration and movement can cause a problem. You can get them at about any auto parts store.
    http://www.draw-tite.com/menu/produ...nu&cat=1595&path=Electrical&content=accessory
     
  16. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    Dump the electric and get a real knife Dave. Just keep it sharp and you won't need the juice.lol:smile2:
     
  17. River_monster91

    River_monster91 New Member

    Messages:
    2,233
    State:
    central kansas
    yea id do that then wrap it in electrical tape
     
  18. bigdaddy83

    bigdaddy83 New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    louisiana
    If you cant replace the whole cord then I would use butt splices and heat shrink tubing.