Help! Castnet Beginner.

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Blacky, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    This year, the guy who did the castnetting for me is no longer around to do my dirty work. So my only chance of getting my immaculate flathead baits is by me myself learning how to do this.

    I know like everything in life once you do it a couple time it's get easier.
    So tell me, how do I begin? Just bought a 6 footer from Dick's for $60.

    Any tips and techniques will be greatly appreciated and will assist in a successful season. Thank you.
     
  2. Mildog

    Mildog Member

    Messages:
    86
    State:
    Virginia
    Calusa cast nets had a video on their web site. I use their method for throwing my 8 footer. You may be able to look on YouTube for some instruction as well. ( I cant go to YouTube now because I am at work :Nop:
     

  3. GrandpaGoneFishing

    GrandpaGoneFishing Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,570
    State:
    Linn Valley, Ks
    There are several instructional videos on You Tube. One of them should Help!
    :Shocked:​
     
  4. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    Its tough to explain, but the bottom line is you have to make the net manageable for you. With a 6 foot net you should choke it down almost half way so that you are only handling a 3.5 feet net. Choke the net in your right hand, reach straight down with left and secure a weight, pick it up and place the weight in between your right thumb/index finger. Reach down with left hand again (keep arm straight) and secure another weight. lift your arm without bending. You are now in the throw position. simply rotate your body and lob the net. Don't try to throw hard or far. The net will open.

    I will send you a PM about a video to watch
     
  5. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    It might be easier to buy a 4' net to learn initially then move up to the 6' net. I find the smaller ones are a lot easier.
     
  6. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    If all else fails try looking in the B.O.C./ U.S.C.A. Library.There is a good article and I believe a Video on how to throw a cast net . I know there is step by step instructions on how to.Best of luck, and practice,practice and more practice.
     
  7. steveturner024

    steveturner024 Active Member

    Messages:
    825
    State:
    Illinois
    Name:
    Steve Turner
    What ever you do make sure your lead line is attached to your wrist or hand good. I threw mine and the whole thing flew into the water. I later snagged it and got it back. Be careful of where your throwing it. I've had a few that got snagged up on rocks or trees in the water and had problems getting it out. I don't let mine sink all the way to the bottom unless I know it won't get snagged. Just some tips I have learned from experience. Practice a lot the more you practice the better you'll get.
     
  8. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

    Messages:
    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    i agree, how tall are you Tan? 6 foot might be frustrating to learn with. short guys know what im talkin bout. smaller may be easier. not saying you cant throw one, i learned when i was 11, and i wasnt very tall. i do remember it being frustrating as all hell. i finally got it. find you a video that you can watch over and over. if your like me, visuals are best, i could explain how to throw one, but at the risk of confusing you.
     
  9. MRR

    MRR New Member

    Messages:
    4,947
    State:
    Louisiana,Mo.
    Members Library Page 3. I looked it up.Its a tips and video that Teas Valley Guy put in there some time back.
    It just might help you some.
     
  10. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    Once you get good you can hold the main line in between your fingers and actually feel when the fish hit the net.
     
  11. nateD

    nateD New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    IN
    you tube has different videos with many different ways to throw a cast net. you can practice the different ways in your backyard to see which one is best for you. everyone has there own favorite. i agree that smaller nets are easier to learn on. i use a 5ft net, i learned with a 4ft. just keep practicing and you will find the net and technique that is best for you.
     
  12. carolinakid76

    carolinakid76 New Member

    Messages:
    609
    State:
    oklahoma
    when I first started throwing a cast net I practiced in my back yard ,till I got the hang of it ,that might help you..
     
  13. Catfishboy1995

    Catfishboy1995 New Member

    Messages:
    3,104
    State:
    Council Bluffs
    These 3.5 foot nets you can just through like a frisbee just with 2 hands..But a 6 footer is a little harder...Paul has a video of brian simcox throughing one that is PERFECT intruction..His username on you tube is catfishcommando
     
  14. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
    I can throw a perfect circle with the 4 foot net, but I'm struggling with the 7 footer I bought. I plan to practice more this week as it is a necessity to be able to be proficient with a cast net.

    Bill in SC
     
  15. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

    Messages:
    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    the bigger ones really take alot of practice. i got to the point where i could throw the 7 - 9 foot range shrimping the Georgia inlets as a teenager. i could only do it on my uncles skiff that had a platform on it for push poleing. i spent many a weekend on that platform. hundreds of throws before i could do it well. endurance is a factor when casting so much, as you do when shrimping. catchin bait, you only gotta be good enuff for one good cast. thats all it takes to harvest enuff shad for a few trips. when you in the shad ofcourse, understanding you gotta locate them first.
     
  16. Catfish_Scooter

    Catfish_Scooter New Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    State:
    Tennessee
    Practicing with a smaller net would be best for a beginner just learning how to throw one. I am still learning but have pretty much got it mastered. You can find several instructional videos on Youtube to help you out. Good luck.
     
  17. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    If you are out practicing and your arm really starts to hurt give it a rest. I spent most of the summer throwing a 7' for hours, I felt pain but I just kept casting through it. Now months later my arm is still having trouble. It is an odd motion to go through.

    If you pick the net in the mouth technique you are more brave than me. I know people get some good throws that way but A) I'm throwing it in the Ohio River and B) have you seen, or more importantly smelled the fish that get caught in these things?
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  18. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

    Messages:
    10,351
    State:
    Philadelphia, P
    I watched a few youtube videos last night.

    Looks harder than I thought.

    This might take some time and practice.
     
  19. rcbbracing

    rcbbracing New Member

    Messages:
    757
    State:
    Ohio
    I started with a 3' net to begin and then worked my way up to a five...it easier for some than others though. Keep in mind you dont always have to do it the way the instructions say. I through a net backwards, kinda like a frisbee letting centrificul motion do its job and it works great for me....so i would say practice practice practice and youlle get it fine...
     
  20. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    This is how I do it. Works for me.
    1. Face the water or turn slighlty sideways. If you are right handed then your left leg should be closer to the water.

    2. Coil the rope into your hand in loops about 12"-14" in diameter except for the last bit close to the swivel.

    3. With your free hand, grab the net by the horn and allow the net hang above the ground.

    4. While still holding the loops in your right hand, grab the net AND that slack line you left, near the horn, and slide that hand down to the half way point of the net and throw the top half of the net over the back of your right hand.

    5. You should now have loops, slack line, and the net in one hand.

    6. Reach down to the lead-line and grab a weight from the front of the net. Stick up the thumb of your right hand and lay the lead-line behind that thumb, or, you can pinch it between the thumb and forefinger.

    7. Reach down to the lead-line and pick up a weight from the left side of the net. Hold this weight near the waist line and keep it there.

    8. Turn your body slightly more away from the water to load the net, then with a gentle sweeping motion, swing the net toward the water while giving your right hand a slight twisting motion as you release the lead-line with the left hand. Remember to keep the other hand near your waist line and immediately release the lead-line after the twist.

    The twisting motion sets the net into rotation. I find that the centrifugal force generated onto the lead-line does a better job of opening the net for me.

    The centrifugal force generated by a rotating net will allow it to open fully in a shorter distance than just a swing and a lob. I have a 25' rope on mine and most of the time can get my net open to the fullest and still have half my rope left over.

    Since the shad are dumb and will only swim a few feet in either direction, it is useful to open that net fully over short distances. I netted 2.5 gallons of shad in just a couple of minutes and never cast more than 10' away from where I stood. Man are they dumb.