Heavy wind anchoring question

Discussion in 'OHIO RIVERS TALK' started by Salmonid, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    For you big river guys, been having some problems geting the anchor to stick on days when the river is really rocking, Im talking about 3-4 ft swells, you know, you anchor in medium current, say in 30 ft of water with about 50 ft of anchor line out and each time the boat front goes up 3 ft, it pulls the anchor a few feet each time the boat goes up with the waves. Ive tried 100+ feet of anchor rope out ( 3-4 times depth) but it does not help, nor does doubling the weight of the anchor, bottom is always fairly smooth gravel or mud, so does anyone have any tips that will help this?? Ran into this in the super choppy water below Meldahl last Sunday and have run into it many times when very windy or when the serious big cigarette boats are out playing and you get the super chop on the water.

    Thanks, Salmonid
     
  2. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    This is a common problem for me. I find myself finding a place to hide from the current or tieing the boat to some type of structure to hold it in place.
     

  3. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    I'm not a big river guy Mark, but have ran into this myself. If you have a trolling motor on your boat, you may be able to help by kicking it on during the rough wakes to help hold postion... Just an idea. Good question though!....rollo
     
  4. ohio hilljack

    ohio hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    943
    State:
    ohio
    I'm a lake fisherman that is just now starting to get to the river so my anchors wouldn't even come close to holding in the river. Then I made a big anchor, my boat no longer moves but my back hurts when I pull her up. I took a 15" car rim and welded a 24" pipe with a ring on the end, hooked up 2 foot of chain when that baby grabs it is in for the count.
     
  5. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Page 4 of the library shows a print for a heavy duty anchor. It's made of 3'' angle and is suppose to be the stuff. I'm in the process of making one now. I really like the looks of it, especially for a sand or mud bottom.
     
  6. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,111
    State:
    evansville
    how much chain do you have between the anchor and the rope??
     
  7. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,111
    State:
    evansville
    here is a link to the anchor for the job!!! you better be healthy if you plan on moving alot but i can tell you we fished the cumberland river this weekend in really heavy current with 40mph wind gusts and 3 foot waves and this bad boy holds!!!! http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=66522
     
  8. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Thats the rig i was referring to. Gettin mine cut out now.
     
  9. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I use a very light fluke style anchor. I beleive that anchor is about 8 lbs, then I have about 3 foot of heavy duty chain which may add another 8 lbs or so. I have always liked those style of anchors for the river, they are light, and easy to retrieve. If you have the right style anchor it shouldnt matter what the front of boat does, just make sure you have plenty of line out. Now I actually have 200ft of rope attached to the anchor, and I always make sure I motor up well above where I want to fish, to get plenty of time to catch. But lets face it, if the current is garbage, and the wind is howling up river, you probably arent going to anchor anywhere unless you can find a spot out of the wind. And I just dont feel real safe using 2 anchors on the river, but that is just me..
     
  10. catcrazed

    catcrazed New Member

    Messages:
    575
    State:
    ohio
    No doubt about it guys, if your in 30 feet of water in current, 50ft of rope out aint gonna cut it. Think of the angle your rope is pulling on your anchor. Darn near straight up. unless were anchoring in super shallow water we almost always let out almost every bit of our 150 foot rope and we also use a 25lb richter anchor. It aint movin!!!!! Now if your only had out 50 foot of rope it would move no matter what. if the front of your boat is bobbin up and down and the current is pullin the boat back, its just gonna pick it up off the bottom, carry it a foot or 2 and set it back down. It wont do that with lots of line out. If your just using one of those anchors like travis is talkin about you definetley have to have out a lot of rope. they have to be pulled in such an angle that they can dig down into the bottom and if there is much angle from the anchor to the boat it will not work, even with chain.
     
  11. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    I found out last year that tying off to trees and other structure worked best for me in good current as well as high winds. Also saved a load of soreness on my back.
     
  12. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    We had the full 100 ft out and it still never holds,( in 25-30 ft of water) guess Ill need to get another 50 ft to add to it....:wink:

    Im not into the big anchor, I already dont have enough storage so the bigger/wider, wont fit in the anchor box, style on anchor isnt an option for me

    Thanks guys
    Salmonid
     
  13. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    space is space bud, lets face it. Beggers cant be choosers. I hate having that thing in the way sometimes to, but its better than the migraine you can get from not being able to anchor. I actually keep a spare on the boat to. I will give up a little space to be able to anchor easily..
     
  14. shadguts

    shadguts New Member

    Messages:
    564
    State:
    Tennessee
    For the last year and a half I've been using a chene type anchor that I built. I can count on one hand the times it wouldn't hold and out of those times it was always a very hard clay bottom and some hot current. In those places I've even tied a 20lb richter type anchor to the rear of the other totaling about 53lbs with 200ft of line out and the boat would only slow to 1.4mph or so:sad2:. I have been using the same one ever since and haven't lost it yet. In 25ft of water 40-50ft of rope is always enough. Had a huge barge wake break it loose while anchored on a sandbar in the Mississippi River once. The one I made is about 33lbs so pulling it up by hand sucks. I personaly like it real heavy. To me the anchor goes straight down in heavy current and doesn't endup way behind the boat. The store bought chenes weigh a lot less and are a little smaller. May be a option for you. Good luck.
     
  15. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    I made an anchor like the one listed earlier in the post.... haven't tried it in heavy current and waves in a river, but work nice in the ocean... I think the key to understand is to have some chain out there... that weight keeps the up and down movement of the bow in control so that the wave action dosent effect the anchor placement.

    Got the chain information from an ocean mooring manual...

    Could go more on the length of the chain as it fools the anchor into thinking that you are using more scope than you really are.... this chain increases the catenary curve which decrease the angle of pull at the anchor.........should do the trick with a boat length of chain ....but more is better...

    bayrunner Ray
     
  16. jrack1

    jrack1 New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    mo.
    i have had to use 2 slip rings.trow them wide, one over each side back a few feet this stops the bow lift and helps the ride a little. so hang in there. after a rain in ruff fast water and wind under the dam.
    jerry
     
  17. Big Sam

    Big Sam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,284
    State:
    Booneville AR
    Name:
    Sam
    Somewhere i read that when anchoring for every 1ft depth you need 6ft of rope out:eek:oooh: I can relate to the 3-4ft swells easily:eek:oooh::tounge_out: They will definately move ya around, but since i began using that formula front & back anchor it really helps a lot course i use railroad iron with chain leaders around 60lbs each anchor:eek:oooh: I have a buddy that swears by something i have not tried yet .....he says on the front instead of hooking the rope up on a cleet ( which is usually up higher) hook the front rope through the eye-hook on the front that you use to attatch the boat to the trailer..he says it cuts down on the movement of the boat up & down & moves the rope a lot less plus the rope is not off center....
     
  18. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Man thats pretty neat I have never thought of that.:wink:
     
  19. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    My standard anchor is 15 lbs, with 2 ft of heavy chain in front of it so its like 22 lbs or so, I also have a 25 lb anchor for heavier water and neither worked and have even had both anchors on 1 time at CJ Brown and 100 ft of rope out, I was in 5 ft of water the wind was blowing sideways, snowing, huge white caps etc. didnt hold then either........That was last Nov for our SWOCC tourney.

    Thanks for the ideas guys.....
    Salmonid
     
  20. goldfish33

    goldfish33 New Member

    Messages:
    27
    State:
    ohio cincy area
    anchoring in the swift water below mehldal is sometimes impossible especially in aluminum boats.they tend to sit high in the water and catch wind like crazy.anchoring from the winch cleat is how i always anchor.i have caught several big blues there over the years by just doing what i call a controlled drift,when the conditions are as you describe.i fish straight over the sides and just off the bottom or at what ever depth i mark fish at.the slow drift is sometimes more beneficial than agravating.i use a twenty lb crab claw with no chain and can anchor in most situations without too much hassle.one thing i might suggest is to tie a line to the anchor snap with a detergent bottle or something so that you can just drop the anchor and move incase of an emergency or a big blue decides to head south in the current.
    if trying to anchor and the wind is whipping you around i use a drift sock out the back.some guys use a five gallon bucket with holes drilled in it which serves the same purpose.