Hand Reels & Handlining

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by peewee williams, May 8, 2006.

  1. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Does anyone out there Still Hand-line or use Hand Reels?As a kid,I always carried hooks,lines sinkers, and waxed kitchen matches in a Prince Albert can,along with a pocket knife.Snare or fishing line,I could always eat along the Santee.I learned more from the Cubans of South Florida in the late 50,s.I also learned a awful lot from a VERY ELDERLY Cod fisherman while stationed in Maine in the 60,s.I enjoyed it until I started Losing the use of my hands.As of last year,I still knew of 2 sources of Hand Reels.It was always a lot of fun,fishing the way that it all started out.It gave you a feeling like no other,to catch a large fish on one.I think that most of the Hand Reels sold now are used to store trolling tackle.Just wondered if anyone out there was still in to it.It seems to be a lost art or method.peewee-williams
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Not counting the things kids might cobble together to try fishing, the first time I ever saw anybody use a handline was on a partyboat out of Panama City, Florida. At that time (early to mid 1950s), the price of your ticket included fishing gear and bait. The fishing gear included was a handline, and probably close to half the people on the boat fished with them. For an additional $3.00, you could rent a rod & reel, which we always did. A few years later, a local handyman used a 36v motor from a surplus airplane to make an electric cranker for the reels. They looked really crude, with a covering that looked like something brought home from day care by your youngest child. The boats promptly adopted the use of the things, and offered the rental of a rod with electric reel for $5.00 extra; you could still get the manually cranked rod & reel for $3.00 if you wanted, but when you have to wind up 200-300 feet to check your bait, the electric reel made it so much faster and gave you so much more actual fishing time of 'bait on the bottom', that the extra $2.00 was well worth the money. These days, I see a totally different version of the electric cranker on reels used by local snaggers. Again, with all the reeling in after 2 or 3 jerks, an electric reel is much faster, and lets them do more fishing (jerking).
     

  3. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Small world.Summer of 58 visited relatives in Panama City.My uncle got me a temporary job on a Party Boat out of Treasure Island Marina,if I remember the name right.Cain;t remember the name of the boat.Cut bait,handled fish,tangle lines,rigging,clean up,etc.I sure hated to see the boy I was filling in for come back.peewee-williams
     
  4. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If I remember right, that would have been on one of Capt. Anderson's boats. He had a fleet of them, and by that time, had his first restaurant. I particularly remember the tables that were made of old hatch covers and filled with polyurethane. That was the first time I had ever seen that done to make a table. Seems like it was only a year or two later that a hurricane took out Capt. Anderson's whole fishing fleet, and he put the insurance money into restaurants rather than back into fishing boats.
     
  5. Catmaster

    Catmaster New Member

    Messages:
    391
    State:
    SE Kansas
    I have seen a couple people use them before. Im sure they get about the same scence of accomplishment out of doing that as I do noodling. THE WAY THEY DID IT BACK WHEN. Hand reels and noodling.
     
  6. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    I have Several Friends That Are Commercial Saltwater Fishermen. They Handline All Of The Smaller Fish That They Target, Usually Small Snappers, The Size The Restaurants Like To Buy.

    Their Reasoning For Doing It That Way Is that It Is Much Faster Than A Rod-N-Reel. 1st Off there Is No Drag To Contend With. 2nd They Can Generally Bring The Fish Straight Up & Into The Boat Quicker. Quicker Means More Fish, More Fish Means MORE Money:big_smile:

    They Will Tell You Right Away THat They Are NOT Sportfishermen. AS Far As The Electric Reels Go, They Use Them For Kingfishing As The Boat Is Not Anchored For That Particular Way Of Fishing. They Also Use Them If THey Are "Deep DRopping" For Groupers.

    Have A good Day, Elliot
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Interesting. Most of the commercial bottom fishing rigs I've seen looked a lot like a giant yo-yo, but with electric power. The spool holding the line was about 15"-18" in diameter, so one turn pulled in a lot of line. Incidentally, haveing a drag on a reel doesn't slow down the fishing a bit if everything else is the same. I mean, if you are using a handline of only 30# actual test, you can only put that much pressure on the line before it breaks; a drag is simply there to keep the line from breaking. Likewise, if you have your reel spooled with 200# test line, you can set your reel drag so that you can exert just as much pull on the line as on a 200# test handline. Now, the length of the rod can greatly affect the amount of pressure you can put on a fish, which is why the commercial rigs I've seen either had no rod at all, or at most, something that looked like a car leaf spring. In either case, it wasn't handheld, but fastened to the boat. Sometimes when there was no rod, the 'reel' would be fastened with a piece of inner tube to provide just a little bit of cushioning.
     
  8. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    JTREW, It Was My Mistake For Not Clarifying Myself Well Enough. When I Posted About The Drag, What I Was Trying To Convey Is That WE Pride Ourselves In Using As Light Of Tackle As Possible, So As To Make Fishing More Of A Sport;Therefore The Drag Comes Into Play.

    As You Said, You Could Just Use Heavier Line, Which is What They Do & That's What Seperates The Sport Fishermen From The "Buisness Men"

    Thank You Again For The Opportunity For Me To Better Convey A Message, Have A Great Day, Elliot
     
  9. catfishkatmando

    catfishkatmando New Member

    Messages:
    494
    State:
    Salem, WV.
    In south Texas you use to se a lot of mexicans using a line wound on a coke bottle it would cast pretty far. SE YOU ON THE FISHBANK SOME TIME
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Elliot, you're absolutely right about doing it for sport instead of simply dragging in as many pounds of fish as possible. It's not unusual for someone who has lots of fun sportfishing to get the idea that it would be just as much fun to become a commercial fisherman. They don't realize that it's about the same thing as thinking that because you enjoy playing with your kids in the sandbox you'd enjoy digging ditches for a living. One is play, the other is work.
     
  11. FishinChris

    FishinChris New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Texas
    In north texas they still do to, I went fishing with some of the guys from work one day , and that is what they brought a bottle with some line wrapped around it , I thought they were just playing with the gringo but they were for real.Catch a fish and take off running.