Grounding

Discussion in 'Boat Repair Help' started by boliver, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. boliver

    boliver New Member

    Messages:
    198
    State:
    Rudy Ark
    when running ground wires for boat gauges,what is best place to ground, this on a fiberglass boat thanks, boliver
     
  2. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    Bolivar, thats a very good question, maybe one of the boat guru's can answer that. Something that I need to know too. I grounded all mine to the battery, which in turn is grounded to the motor, I assume this is correct, but not really sure. everything works on mine, but i havent put it on the water yet. Might be a shocking experience. LOL.

    You catching any fish anywhere? Been going to Kerr lake this last week and caught a few nice blues. No water really moving on the main river so havent given it a shot. Drift fishing at Kerr has produced fairly good. Fresh Cut shad is the bait to use over there, Fresh skips too if you can find any.

    Im just over the hill from ya, we should meet up someday.

    Mac
     

  3. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    You can buy a ground bar or you can make one like I did. I used a piece of copper bar about 1 inch wide and about 1/8 inch thick and 6 inches long.

    I drilled small holes thru it and put small bolts thru it and hooked one ground from the battery to the bar. The rest of the wires I hooked to the bar.
    You can locate it any where you want to. I put mine under the console.
    Keep in mind if this is an aluminum boat the ground needs to be insulated away from the boat fiber glass doesn't matter.
     
  4. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    This reminds me of something I've been meaning to ask for a while.

    On an aluminum boat, doesn't simply mounting the outboard motor in essence ground the negative battery terminal to the hull? My last jon boat was meticulously wired correctly and yet the hull and the negative battery terminal had continuity. This was an electric start outboard.
     
  5. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Yes it does seem to me like that would be the case. I guess that is why they encourage the use of zink anodes. I guess this cuts down on the electrolysis.

    Good question by the way.
     
  6. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    I use a fuse panel that has an neg. & pos. "buss bar". It makes hook-ups real simple.

    When I hook up the pos. cable to it, I go thru a major amperage fusible link first, in the event of some catastrophic short:eek:oooh:
     
  7. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    You can get the little connector bars at Radio shack and hardware stores like Lowes or Home Depot. Everything on the boat grounds to the battery.
     
  8. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I think most boats that have factory gauges and electronics come with a negative and a positive buss bar or a fuse panel but if not then you can make both like bubbakat discribed with a wire from each going straight to the battery and on an aluminum boat you'll have a floating ground if you insulate them from the hull.
     
  9. boliver

    boliver New Member

    Messages:
    198
    State:
    Rudy Ark
    thanks everyone i thought thats the way it would be but i was hooking up a gas gauge with new sender with the warnings about correct wiring i didn't want to make a mistake. boliver
     
  10. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I just went out and checked on my new boat it it has continuity from the hull to the negative terminal of the battery too. So that's 3 boats that I know are all wired correctly that are like this. On an aluminum boat with electric start, I don't see how it could be any different. You'd have to put a rubber mat between the motor and the hull and use nylon bolts, which obviously can't happen. :lol:
     
  11. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I think most aluminum boats use the hull as the negative for some electronics and lights but the starter cables are usually in the cable coming from your motor to the battery. I don't think the hull is intented for a starter or battery charging ground I think that would cause problems with some of the more delicate electronics like fish finders. I've worked on a few aluminum boats but I own a fiberglass boat which wires a lot different.
     
  12. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I see what you're saying now. Let me clarify. All the boats I've worked on are wired with common or buss bar grounds to the negative battery post and fused hots. No accessory or engine negative was wired directly to the hull like in automotive wiring practices. But simply hanging an electric start outboard on an aluminum hull makes the connection from negative to the hull. I've been boating like this for 12 years or so and it hasn't ever been an issue.
     
  13. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    You are correct, the aluminum mega-yachts around here all have bonding straps, so that there isn't any "stray" electrical current.

    Take for instance, on your vehicle, if the interior electrical devices are not properly grounded the ground path will more than likely be routed via the cooling system resulting in multiple heater core failures.:eek:oooh:

    Any device that creates high amperage draws, I.E. Blower motor etc., will wreak havoc on your system, when dedicated grounds are not present.