Green LED lights in the boat

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by Catfish_Commando, Jul 12, 2009.

  1. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    I sent out an e-mail several months ago to the Catfish Syndicate group when I installed some green LED's in my boat.

    IMAGE BELOW:

    GREEN LED LIGHT PICTURE

    Hindsight being 20/20, some lessons learned..

    1. They work great, but are very bright. I definitely positioned mine in the wrong place for night fishing. I need to rig both sides of the boat, so the side of the boat you are fishing on, you can turn the opposite side on and the light will be behind you.

    2. Used to many, like I said, the newer ones kick out plenty of light. When I had the side of my boat off, I didn't want to risk going to few.

    Shop around. The same kits you see online, distributers sale the exact components for much less.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2009
  2. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,111
    State:
    evansville
    most of the time i see people using red. what made you chose green? i an ready to buy some myself but im not sure what color i want..
     

  3. bluehunter

    bluehunter New Member

    Messages:
    3,004
    State:
    Los Angele
    I have yellow ones in my boat. Seems to work well.
     
  4. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Military Training, Jump Master / Sniper.

    White - Safest bet in high risk environments, or when night vision is not a concern.

    Red is best for tactical situations, or when you want just enough light to work with, and preserve a groups visual integrity.

    Example: Inflight Rigging for a mass tactical jump. They need to see to put their parachutes on, and the safeties to conduct JMPI, but you dont want them blind when they hit the drop zone. Need high recovery rates.

    Green: A safe middle ground light spectrum. Can work safely, not as good as white, but better than red.

    Example: Have to haul butt quick in your boat, your night vision will recover quicker from green V.S. white.

    Green is a good work color for night operations.

    But the crazy colors would get you big pimp points :wink:
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
  5. GatorT

    GatorT New Member

    Messages:
    390
    State:
    Camden, South Carolina
    How about the bugs?
     
  6. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    From Unka Sam:

    Dark Adaptation. Dark adaptation is the process by which the eyes increase their sensitivity to low levels of light. Soldiers adapt to the darkness at varying degrees and rates. During the first 30 minutes in a dark environment, the eye sensitivity increases roughly 10,000 times, but not much further after that time.

    Dark adaptation is affected by exposure to bright lights such as matches, flashlights, flares, and vehicle headlights.

    Full recovery from this exposure may take up to 45 minutes.
     
  7. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Here is a good excerpt that answers the bug question:


    The red LED has been added to flashlights to enhance night vision. It provides great contrast and is not visible to the human eye over long distances. It also works well with night vision scopes and goggles. Photographers use the red colored light when doing night-time photography because it provides contrast while preserving the natural shadows developed by darkness. It cuts through smoke better than white light and, with the exception of red lines and marks on maps and charts, it makes reading in low, or no, light possible. Police and military units like the red LED for night operations because it will not interfere with night vision technology and can't easily be picked up by other people.

    The green LED light is preferred by hunters and fishermen because it is a very soft light that will not spook their prey. Green also does not attract insects like white or yellow light does. It is not easily picked up, unless looking directly at it, so it is useful in covert operations. It is another color that is useful in smoke filled environments.

    The blue LED hand-held light is good for map or chart reading in situations where night vision, and avoiding detection, are important. Blue light is also helpful in locating blood and other bodily fluids at crime scenes or during search and rescue operations. Hunters also find the blue light helpful in following blood trails of injured animals. Blue lights are often used in small keychain lights because they are a soft light that works well to illuminate locks, keys, and small items. It does not have the same harsh glare as the bright, white LED. These lights are also good for cutting through fog.
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2009
  8. GatorT

    GatorT New Member

    Messages:
    390
    State:
    Camden, South Carolina
    Thanks Paul!! And thanks for the hats!!:cool2:
     
  9. Iowa_Josh

    Iowa_Josh New Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    State:
    Central Iowa
    People thinking alike! I have some little led bars I ordered in red and green and I've checked them out but haven't installed any yet. They were really cheap. I didn't think about just putting them on just one side. I was gonna angle them down, maybe it wouldn't matter then? I do know, according to LED spec sheets, the emitters put out a lot more green and blue than red. Red is often 1/2 the output of other colors. Maybe that is a good thing because you only need a teeny little bit for a nightlight.
     
  10. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    you might try some double sided tape for mock up to see how you want to light up before mounting.

    looks good paul, good to see the boss man posting stuff that doesent have rules attached :wink::cool2:
     
  11. CatHunterSteve

    CatHunterSteve New Member

    Messages:
    456
    State:
    Snowville, Va
    Thanks for the information and the pics. very useful, want to add some LED's to my boat and you have help me decide what to go with.
     
  12. nitronostrils

    nitronostrils New Member

    Messages:
    292
    State:
    IL
    This picture was taken at dusk, they give off plenty of light. 2 15led strips up front, 2 30led strips in back.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. daystarchis

    daystarchis New Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    State:
    Clovis Cali
    Well at dusk they are already bright. I can imagine at night. Great picture brother. I like the set up:wink:
     
  14. drpepper

    drpepper New Member

    Messages:
    6,133
    State:
    Indiana
    ol "Bill in SC" has blue L.E.D's on his skiff- I really liked its illumination alot and it didn't attract the bugs. Also made good light for pics- especially bluecat pics.
     
  15. crawford1

    crawford1 Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    west virginia
    could someone tell me where to find these lights. Thanks
     
  16. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    I am going with low profile round "big truck" LED marker lights. (employee discount :big_smile: ) easy to find, easy to replace, cheap. One "battery" (3)of red, and one (3) of white.

    That number may change, I have not sparked them up in the boat yet, but one single(red) will light up the floor of a "half bath" good enough to see what you are stepping on.
     
  17. 7mmmag1

    7mmmag1 New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Like the set up, looks like you shouldnt have any problem finding where you dropped that hook
     
  18. Titus

    Titus New Member

    Messages:
    42
    State:
    Shelbyville, Ky
    The PO put white rope lights along both gunnels on my boat, they are ok, but toast your night vision and dont light the floor well. I wonder if I can take them off (plastic C clips) and paint the rope or wrap with green celaphane or something???
     
  19. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Darn, but I hate being a pessimist. I was looking for more specific information, but this is all I could presently find about lights at night.


    U.S. Coast Guard Requirements - Lighting
    Coast Guard minimum equipment requirements vary with the size of your boat, type of propulsion, whether operated at night or in periods of reduced visibility, and, in some cases, the body of water on which it is used. Boats carrying passengers for hire have additional equipment requirements. For more complete details on how many and what types of equipment you must have aboard your boat, request a copy of the free brochure, "Federal Requirements for Recreational Boats", either from your local BoatUS Marine Center, the BoatUS Foundation, or from the Coast Guard Customer Info Line at 800-368-5647.

    Please note that requirements shown below hold true for most areas, but local regulations are intricate. Be sure to check with your local government for marine safety regulations in your area. You can visit your state's boating page by surfing to the Foundation website at http://www.boatus.com/onlinecourse/statehomepg.html.

    Navigation (Running) Lights

    Required on boats between sunset and sunrise. A sailboat under motor only, or under sail and motor, is considered a powerboat, and must display appropriate lights.

    BOATS UNDER 12 METERS (39.4')

    Sailboats-Separate or combination red and green sidelights, 112.5°, visible 1 n.m. White stern light, 135°, visible 2 n.m. OR, tri-color masthead light.

    Powerboats-Separate or combination red and green sidelights, 112.5°, visible 1 n.m., placed above hull at least 1 meter (3.3') below masthead light. Masthead: white, 225°, visible 2 n.m., at least 1 meter above side lights. White stern light, 135°, visible 2 n.m. OR, one all-round (360°) white light (should also have sidelights).

    Now, the way I interput this, is that your allowed to have red or green lights as long as they are visible for 112.5 degrees from front center. If you were to use these colored lights along the sides of your boats, and they are visible beyond the above arc, your in violation of USCG regs. Of course this in itself may not mean much, it depends upon the enforcement people in your area.

    I would think a color other than red, green or white may be acceptable. I would hate for someone to run over my boat (with me in it) because of the night vision lights I chose to use.
     
  20. RPnKC

    RPnKC New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Kansas
    Here's an eye opener for you.
    I sell the lamps(bulbs if you're not in the industry), to this company.
    http://www.underwaterlightsusa.com/gallery.html
    Hope you enjoy the pics. The DC model requires 8amps start-up and 4-4.6amps running......got juice?:smile2:
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009