Great Miami River Freak Channel Cat 12-20-08

Discussion in 'OHIO RIVERS TALK' started by dinkbuster1, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    took advantage of the high muddy water and done some 'cattin today in the Miamisburg area of the GMR, first cat trip for me since mid november. was getting bites fairly steady for about 2 hrs, missed a bunch and caught about 10 fish. was using small chunks of frozen shad on circle hooks fished right off bank in 3-4ft of water. fish were really slow biting, resembled the "turttle taps" you get from softshells. all fish were between 1-5lb, had a really BIG one i guesstimated close to 10lb that snapped my hook off when i tried to pull it up a steep mud bank. also caught my first "Humpback" channel. i call them humpbacks but they actually have a disorder called "Lordosis", something like Scoliosis and causes a curvature of the spine. i myself and friends have caught quite a few Flatheads with this disorder but this was the first time i seen a channel with it.

    http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n277/dinkbuster1/100_3970.jpg
     
  2. slimdaddy

    slimdaddy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,600
    State:
    Nelsonville, Oh
    Name:
    Keith
    ive never seen anything like that in my area strange looking fish
     

  3. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper New Member

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    1,492
    State:
    Dallas, GA
    Hmm, pretty crazy lookin' man! Thanks for the picture.
     
  4. neocats

    neocats New Member

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    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    I sure hope thats not genetic.
     
  5. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

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    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I dont suppose it has to do with the GMR fish's daily diet of Toxic and septic waste, pesticides and PCB's do ya???:eek:oooh:

    Salmonid
     
  6. hunted

    hunted New Member

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    1,943
    State:
    washington court house,oh
    first time i have seen that,interesting
     
  7. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

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    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    I have seen footage online of a flathead with that condition. Thanks for sharing the pic.
     
  8. lendog

    lendog New Member

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    2,141
    State:
    berks, PA
    wow that is a strange condition, never seen that before and i've seen some messed up lookin cattys:eek:oooh:
     
  9. catcrazed

    catcrazed New Member

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    575
    State:
    ohio
    as you all know, I am a die hard cpr fan but I think I would have put the ugly little dude out of his missery. LOL
     
  10. repoman3809

    repoman3809 New Member

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    788
    State:
    Cincinnati, Ohi
    Thanks for the post, I never knew such a thing existed. Least now I wont wig out if I happen to catch one.:crazy:....course that requires actually catching something, which I havent done much of lately..LOL
     
  11. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

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    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    looks like something out of a godzilla movie rick
     
  12. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Let me get this right: You guys fish for and catch "Brokeback" catfish?

    Maybe they could make a movie.

    I'm sure Clint could Direct.

    Get Tom Selleck to play the part of Jack.
    and Charlie Sheen to play H2oMellon.
     
  13. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    now thats funny lol :eek:oooh::big_smile: rick
     
  14. luckey wade

    luckey wade New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    ohio
    Thats pretty cool .My friend had caught a small mouth bass that had a arch back one time.
     
  15. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    new some of that general ichthyology would come in handy.

    The medical condition that you noted in your channel cat (thanks for the post by the way. Sick and geneticly deficient fish should always be noted. it's also a good idea to bring it to the attention of the local DNR warden) is actually called "kyphosis."

    Lordosis refers to an opposite curvature sometimes refered to as "saddleback."

    The main point being is that kyphosis is a symptom and not a disease in and of itself normally. I do hope greatly that you did not release the fish, and trust that you didn't.

    For EVERYONE'S information. DNR depends on us as well as thier own scientific harvest to check general health of the waters. DNR can provide you with a list of reportable (diseases that should be reported immediately) diseases and thier associated symptoms so that you can quickly identify certain diseases. Whenever you find a fish with a reportable health problem, note the breed, water body, location caught, and harvest method. Most importantly, you should note water body, location, and breed.

    I'll attempt to contact a dnr officer tommorow for a list that I can post.

    Hopefully they'll have a pamphlet with photos of symptoms of reportable diseases that you can keep in your tacklebox along with a list of phone numbers of reporting offices.

    I'll get back with that info ASAP.
     
  16. catchaser19

    catchaser19 New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    UTAH
    Wow:eek:oooh: i see that quite often in trout. I have never even heard bout it with other species. Thanks for sharin.
     
  17. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    wasn't going to mention it in this thread, but when you see this in salmonids (any fish in the salmon family that has an adipose fin) and YOUNG fish in the pickerell (pike) family, then you are probably seeing the early stages of "whirling disease," or "black tail" disease.

    This disease is probably the worst disease that a fish can get, but luckily, only salmonids like trout and salmon, and very young pike are succeptible to it.

    The disease was introduced to the states from germany with the introduction of brown trout. Germans argue that we gave them the disease when the rainbow was introduced to their waters.

    The disease has been known of since just after WWI. Who gave the disease to who has been lost to the annuls of history, but remains a hot topic of discussion between german and american anglers (i had quite a few discussions with one of my german fishing buddies while i was stationed in grafenwoehr).

    regardless of it's origins, it's a highly transmittable disease that's comparable to aids among salmonids. it's a viral disease located in the spinal fluid that causes the slow death of the tail. The tail eventually turns black (hence the name black tail) and the fish loses most of it's motor abilities causing it to swim in circular patterns (hence whirling disease) and inhibiting it's ability to feed. The fish will normally die from starvation before the disease itself kills them. Regardless, the disease is 100% lethal with no known cure.

    This disease is REPORTABLE no matter what state you're in. Any fish showing the symptoms of it should be captured and removed from it's body of water to hopefully prevent infection of other fish.

    As I said earlier, pike are only succeptable at a very young age, but are the only fish outside of the salmonid family that are succeptable at all. I have my own theories for this, but have already hijacked this thread enough.

    If you have any questions about it, you can PM me, or do a search for "whirling disease" as it's a very well known and researched disease. If you are a trout fisherman, then you should make it your business to know about this disease.
     
  18. catfishcrazy256

    catfishcrazy256 New Member

    Messages:
    2,648
    State:
    Indiana
    I see it in farm raised channels , due to inbreading
     
  19. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Zac, many of the trout I catch here locally Bows and Browns have the whacked back thing but in most cases here in Ohio, it is usually accompanied by a triangular scar from a heron hit which often breaks part of the back and the survivors ussualy resemble the broke back cat. Very common among trout streams and yes, Ohio hatcheries were the 2nd state in the us to fing WD in their hatcheries but I often see it on Brown Trout which are much less likely to have WD and where i see the triangular scars. Herons have a prefference for Browns over rainbows, must taste better??? and all hatcheries typically have a federal permit to shoot herons on site, I know all the ohio hatcheries ( state and private) have that authority. Just another reason why some salmonids have that deformity. That and at early ages are handled in bulk manners making hatchery fish way more able to survive a back injury do to many hands moving them as they grow, its typical for a hatchery to raise trout fry from eggs and be touched/netted in bulk at least a dozen times before they are turned loose at 9-10". A wild fish with a back injury wont last a week in the wilds.
    Just my .02

    Zac, curious where you picked up that much info on salmonids, certainly not living in Ohio.....

    Salmonid
     
  20. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    Sorry ya lost the big one Dink. I'd have loved to seen a pic of it.