Gravel Pit blue catfish?

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by Salmonid, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    A buddy of mine has access to a large gravel pit here in SW Ohio, about 75 acres, with water that is over 70' deep in places. He is a good fisherman and was telling me the owners of the lake had stocked blues and flatheads between 5-7 years ago so the last year he fished HARD for them getting tons of channels , a few over 10 lbs even but never a flattie or a Blue cat. Flatheads are easy to come around here with some effort but its the blues he would like to catch.
    Anyone have any experience with Blues in a old quarry pit? do they do ok? any spawning? ( the channels spawn real good in his lake so the structures are there) Any patterns to suggest to him?
    Up here in Ohio we just dont have enough experience with blues since they are only found in the Lower ohio river here.

    Any help would be great, lakes are full of bluegills, bass, shad and perch and a few walleyes even. He has spent a lot of time int he deeper water drifting bluegills and such and only catching channels.

    Salmonid
     
  2. RiverKing

    RiverKing Active Member

    Messages:
    2,232
    State:
    Yellow Spr
    That sounds like a fun place to fish, i would think the blues would do okay in there, but im not sure if they would spawn or not.
     

  3. BigCatDreaming

    BigCatDreaming New Member

    Messages:
    263
    State:
    Illinois
    In my picture i'm actually fishing a large and deep gravel pit. I may not know to much about fishing for blues in a gravel pit, but I know where to find the channels in the one I fish. If theyre is any sort of machinery or damlike structure going into the water its always usually holding something near by. If your fishing in the summer and it gets mid-day I'd try to find a drop-off point that goes into that 70 foot of water. Mark it, and fish around that area. If your friend actually owns the gravel pit I'd have him build a few fish cribs and sink them in the deeper water or the easiest accesible areas.
     
  4. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    Its sounds like a good spot, I hear a gravel pit is a good place to fish.
     
  5. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    old quarry/pay-pond, should be able to find them in the same places. when i used to "pay-fish" the blues would hang out and feed exclusively over the deepest areas of the lake rarely venturing anywhere else. if its a deep, blue, and clear lake then the shad and crappie will be very deep most of the time and thats where the blues will be too. if there truly is a 70ft area i would fish with a slip float set between 40-60ft. if its the "lake" i am thinking of then give me a shout, maybe we can do a "fact finding mission":big_smile:
     
  6. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    could someone explain what a gravel pit is? is it just a pay-pond?
     
  7. dixiedrifter

    dixiedrifter New Member

    Messages:
    102
    State:
    Tennessee
    A gravel pit is a rock quarry where the stone is crushed into gravel.
     
  8. trad_archer

    trad_archer New Member

    Messages:
    39
    State:
    Cook Springs, AL
    I dive and spearfish in rock quarrys all the time. The ones around here have full tree's and forest in them. When i freedive i always sink a bag of chum in about 40 feet then wait till night and swim down and shoot. The smaller blues will be swarming and the bigger ones will be laying or hanging just outside of all the fuss. I got some great pictures of some real monsters. I only shoot the eating ones(up to 10lb.) Maybe try the chum bag? I will see if i can find the pics.....shane
    P.S. The quarry's i dive also have a road that circles them down to the bottom. The walls are straight down except for the leveled off road bed. Real easy to find the fish.