Grape vines

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by Katfish Kern, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. Katfish Kern

    Katfish Kern New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Florida
    Does anyone know about growing grape vines?? I live in central florida, and I am wondering if I can grow them here. Also where I could purchase some vines, and how I would set up some trellises. Any help would be greatly appreciated.:0a36:
     
  2. Boomer

    Boomer New Member

    Messages:
    1,037
    State:
    Oklahoma
    I planted some this year. I got them from Wally World. I dont see why they wouldnt grow in Florida. They grow them in Oklahoma.

    I also planted some blue berries as a test.

    As for something for them to climb on I would suggest a fence of some kind. I have an old wall that comes out from house, and there are old grape vines there, I think they are dead, so I just planted mine next to them.
     

  3. loop

    loop New Member

    Messages:
    422
    State:
    Newkirk,Oklahom
    Theres alittle more to grow a productive vine than one would think best advice I cuold offer is go on line and read up on it.. Vines have to be maintained and pruned for them to really produce well.
    Loop
     
  4. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I agree with loop. Not that I'm an expert.
    This is the 3rd year for mine. I've 9 vines 3 different varieties.
    We had 1 bunch last year. This year it'll be 20 or 30. It takes 3 years to get "full" production. The first year rabbits nipped off the shoots so most of mine are at least a year behind.
    There is a lot of info on line.
    best of luck on your venture.
    just
     
  5. kevhead56

    kevhead56 New Member

    Messages:
    62
    State:
    Greenfield, Il
    Go to your local extension office and talk to them. They whould be able to point you in the right direction. Also, Stark Bros. Nurseries can give you good advise for plants that work in your area.
     
  6. CoonX

    CoonX Member

    Messages:
    737
    State:
    Oklahoma City O
  7. Katfish Kern

    Katfish Kern New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Florida
    Appreciate all the help folks. Do you think a trellis system would be best or can I just grow them up my fence?
     
  8. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    About 15 years ago I planted grape vines on a fence. Boy was that a waste of time. Sometime, when I get time, I want to trim them back real good and remove that fence. Next attempt by me will be on pipe supports. I have the pipe in stock, just need the time to weld it together.

    That fence broke down, posts rotted off, now it's a mess.
     
  9. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I used the trellis system.
    Thats the way the pros do it.
    I can imagine lots of greif using fence.
    I used landscape timbers for the posts. Might have been a mistake cause I have some that I used for fence that broke. Now I wish I'd have used hedge posts.
    good luck
    just
     
  10. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Of course you can grow them in Fl. just be sure and check your extension service to see what varieties will grow well their.
    I have 25 vines of Vignoles, 25 Catawba & 25 concord, so I do have some experience. As stated, please do not use a fence, you will regret it!! I have to prune very heavy each spring, just as the buds are bulging out. This last spring, I hauled off 16 pickup loads of vines I pruned off. By looking at the vines afterward, you would swear that I killed them. Nothing but stubs left and sap bleeding out of each cut like a faucet. Yet, between August 1 & September 30, they will produce an average of one gallon of wine per plant if it's a good year. Yeah, I know, that's 375 bottles of wine. Good thing I get plenty of blackberries & cherries or we wouldn't have enough to get through the year. LOL
     
  11. catfish slick

    catfish slick New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    California
    Rail road ties make good posts for your grape vines, and they will not rot off in the ground in your life time. and galvanized clothes line wire and turn buckles for the runners. that is what most of the grape growers use hear around Bakersfield, where they grow a lot of grapes. do any of you members make your own Raisons. The wife and I just put out 39 cardboard beer flats of grapes to dry and make our raisons for the year. Home dried raisons are much better then any that you can buy, and I can;t wait for that first Raison Pie.
     
  12. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I have never attempted to make raisins. Around here, the birds would eat them all long before they dried out. It's hard enough to pick the grapes before the birds get them all. My Vignoles crop was the worst ever this year. 90% were dried up on the vine. Not sure the cause, but I suspect the wasps. Catawba should be ready within the next 3 weeks or so. Some are already ripe enough to eat. Concord still have over a month to go.
     
  13. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Here is a pic of my Catawba the other day. (The one next to the chain link fence) & the pic with the bird house is my Vignoles. If you notice, the posts are treated 12 inch diameter, with 6 strands of galvanized 8 gauge wire.
     

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  14. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Thanks for the info.
    Been wondering when to expect the different grapes.
    My Concords are splitting.??? Any ideas why.
     
  15. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Too much heat will do that and on occasion, too much water.
     
  16. catfish slick

    catfish slick New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    California
    Tom, we put our grapes in Beer box, are water bottle box flats. then cover them with cheese cloth netting.. that keeps the birds and bugs out and they sure turn out great. the boxes have to be turned 180 degrees every day for the first few days. but that is easy, as we just turn the whole table.