Good snagging reel?

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by kickin_wing, Mar 23, 2007.

  1. kickin_wing

    kickin_wing New Member

    Messages:
    324
    State:
    Illinois
    It seems like i always mess a reel up when i go snagging. Ive tried cheep reels and ive tries the Abu 7000i, wich was the last reel i messed up snagging. I need a reel that can handle the preasure of snagging. Any ideas? :0a36:
     
  2. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Penn 309. It's a much larger & sturdier reel than the 7000. Don't know about your area, but an electric retrieve system is available for it here in central Arkansas.
     

  3. kickin_wing

    kickin_wing New Member

    Messages:
    324
    State:
    Illinois
    How much does one of those usualy run.
     
  4. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    As much as I love my 7000s, I've seen some stripped out (plastic idler gear) and have almost stripped one or two out myself on some of them I've hooked in to. I've got a couple older models with the metal idler gear that have held up better with no problems.

    However, when I'm snagging, especially when the fish seem to be averaging over 30lbs, then I strap on my Penn 320GTI. I haven't had any problems with it yet! IT'S A WINCH!

    I'll keep using my 7000s for baitfishing and striper fishing with my big surf rods, but will keep using my 320 for snagging.:smile2:
     
  5. kickin_wing

    kickin_wing New Member

    Messages:
    324
    State:
    Illinois
    How about a penn 209, i know its a little smaller but it is cheaper.
     
  6. ravenloft420

    ravenloft420 New Member

    Messages:
    346
    State:
    mo
    eletric retrieve?? ...................... in the year 2525 haha sorry I had to:lol:
     
  7. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Penn Long Beach and Super Long Beach reels were all built to use like a winch and have a 2.5:1 ratio for such use.They were made to haul big fish out of reefs and wrecks according to Penn and thousands of people beside me have seen them do it.They are no longer made,but are available as are the parts.These reels were made to haul anything on the bottom to the boat.Everyone but die hard ABU folks seem to be able to learn to cast them.They are not level wind.I have a Penn 345 GTI level wind with a 3.25:1 ratio that I believe would work if you have to use a level wind.I have never tried snagging so I can not really recommend a reel for it.I can recommend reels that I have seen winch in huge saltwater fish from reefs and wrecks in deep water.I think you would have to work very hard and deliberately to destroy one of these.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  8. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    We started out using a Penn 309, then to Penn 209's, but now just mainly use Garcia 6000's from Wally World and don't have any problems reeling in big old paddlefish. That's what my dad uses anyhow.

    I like using surf tackle, and the reel I've been using for the last 6 years is a Southbend Hurricane spinning reel. They don't make them anymore, but that thing has brought in lord only knows how many paddlefish between 50 and 70 pounds.

    Southbend has a newer model that replaced the Hurricane called the Calypso Beachcomber spinning reel. I got one to try this year and so far I really like it. It doesn't hold as much line as the hurricane does, but its got a better drag system and 3 ball bearings instead of just 1 so its alot smoother.
     
  9. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    When I was snagging below Ky Dam there was about 10 of us all with 309 Penns. We never had a problem . Plenty of line capacity. Strong and durable.:lol: :big_smile:
     
  10. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    I got tired of reeling with the slow and low 309 but it is built. the 220gto is faster its built like 309+320gt2=220gto
     
  11. fishinnstudyin

    fishinnstudyin New Member

    Messages:
    62
    State:
    MO
    went out to a bank spot on Mississippi River. Every single angler (about 50+) had a spinning reel, the vast majority seemed to be Okuma Epixor. I had an Okuma Epixor 80, but an EF50 was more than enough. I hear good things about these reels from saltwater anglers as well, the only complaint was they are a tad bit on the heavy side. Give them a try, you can find them for less than 40 bucks on ebay new. What you can also try doing is instead of making the drag do all the work, you can try thumbing the spool as well. I do that with my Abu Garcia 5500. It has 80 lb powerpro on it and when I got something fairly big, I dont even bother using the drag, I just use my thumb to put all the pressure and I guess it helps reduce drag wear. sometimes i also have my other free hand clamping down on the line in a tug of war. i believe 5500 and 6500 have same drag strength, but just different line capacity.
     
  12. kickin_wing

    kickin_wing New Member

    Messages:
    324
    State:
    Illinois
    Well i might have to invest in a 309, i can get one here in town for 70$. I sent my Abu 7000i back to the company because it was still under waranty. When i get it back im just gonna use it for catfish, no snagging with it.:cool2:
     
  13. dex

    dex Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Peewee Williams said it best when he said Penn Long Beaches . I own both a 65 and 67, The 67 haven't even come close to being tested find it cheap on ebay
     
  14. kyjake

    kyjake New Member

    Messages:
    714
    State:
    kentucky
    What size line do you use on the larger Long Beach reels and how do they cast?Thinking about getting one for surf rod and using 30 or 40 lb. line.I now use 9's,10's,209's and 309's.Abu's for light work.
    Jake
     
  15. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I have used the Old time braid 50 lb.Dacron and 50 & 80 lb.mono.on my Penn Longbeach 68.It is rated for 400 yards of 50 lb.line.Many young folk do not know that braid was around way before mono.The very old braids were of natural fibers.Dacron was the first artificial braid that I know of and used.In the 50's a spool of "heavy silk thread" was highly prized for using with tiny bait hooks for catching Shiners.It still works great.Also for lite cane pole pan fish fishing.A sewing shop ordered my last spool for me.My old "Lew's Bream Buster"with silk thread is still hard to beat for Red Ear,Bluegill and Redbreast.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  16. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I am trying to figure out how I can safely handle 30 lb.test.008" dia. braided line on a Coronado CD 90,with out burning,or worse,cutting my fingers off as I have little to no feeling in them.I realize that your line is about 3 times larger in diameter than mine,but you still must have some kind of protection when you are "thumbing the spool" or "clamping down on the line."What do you use for protection?Thanks.I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee
     
  17. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Just got my 9000BG in, spooled it up and took it snaggin yesterday. It's WONDERFUL! Can't think of a better snagging reel. I thought it would be harder to throw than my 7000, but I was wrong! I think it might be as easy if not easier to throw than the 7000. They're awsome, but JMO.
     
  18. cathouse

    cathouse New Member

    Messages:
    313
    State:
    NY
    Peewwee i'm sure you remember the days when guys would use a piece of leather to save those precious fingers when casting , sounds like this might be your answer now . I hope can help you just this once and thanks for all that youve done .
     
  19. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Thanks.I am honored by your post.Yes I am familiar with the various leather flaps and thumb guards.It is just that after reading post # 11,I realize that there must be some methods that I am not familiar with.Thumbing a spool of braid and clamping down on braided line with your hand instead of using your drag for large fish will destroy the flesh in contact with the line unless your hand is a prothesis.Even then,it will damage and eventually destroy a prothesis much as it does rod guides unless it is made of a very special and unusual materials.To me there is a secret there somewhere as flesh and even steel will be damaged by such contact.I am hoping that the knowledge could help me.I will be the first to admit that I cannot figure out how to do it without physical damage.I am very familiar with the callused thumbs and hands used for control when casting and also to apply pressure to the reel for added drag on the mooching or outher reels.I am not familiar with any flesh tough enough to be used in place of a drag in direct contact with braid.Thanks.I love you Brothers and Sisters,peewee
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Peewee, another trick is to salvage old cotton gloves that have holes in one or two of the fingers. Cut off the fingers that are still good, slip them over your thumb (or finger, for a spinning reel), and keep it on with a rubber band. Just be careful not to get the rubber band so tight that it cuts off the circulation; it doesn't have to be tight to hold on the glove finger.

    Folks who have never used an electric retrieve reel tend to think of it as an electric winch. Having an electric retrieve doesn't make the reel a winch anymore than having a handle makes it a manual winch. It has little or no effect on the actual fishing---if anything, it makes the actual snagging a little more difficult, because it's easier to control the retrieve between snags with a manual retrieve. And it doesn't make fighting the fish any easier. What it does do is make reeling in afterward much faster and easier. This reduces the time between casts, allowing you to spend more time actually snagging. I've never used an electric reel for snagging, but I've used them a good bit bottom fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. When you get a good bite followed by nothing, obviously, you need to check your bait. Manually reeling in from 200' of water seems to take forever. If you're trying to catch fish, it comes down to how much time you can spend with a baited hook where the fish are, or with your snagging hooks actually being jerked through the water. If you can double that time, you've basically got twice as much fishing done. Don't get the idea that I don't enjoy being on the water, and being with friends, but that's not fishing, that's taking it easy and socializing. When I get around to actually putting hooks in the water, I want to maximize my chances of catching fish.