Good news.....

Discussion in 'LOCAL NORTH CAROLINA TALK' started by greggofish, Jun 26, 2006.

  1. greggofish

    greggofish New Member

    Messages:
    214
    State:
    Holly Springs, NC
    Got this from the NCWRC website.

    Talk about making a great river greater......



    [The following is a joint release with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, National Marine Fisheries Service and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission.]

    Removal of Cape Fear River Locks and Dams Could Improve Fish Populations

    RALEIGH, N.C. (June 26, 2006) – The removal of three obsolete dams in North Carolina could improve recreational and commercial fisheries for striped bass, American shad, hickory shad, and help tremendously in restoration efforts for river herring, Atlantic sturgeon and shortnose sturgeon.

    The demolition of locks and dams No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 along the Cape Fear River would restore very important spawning and nursery habitat for these migratory fish in the river, and increases in their populations would likely result, according to the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

    If recovery of the striped bass, American shad and hickory shad populations happened as predicted, recreational and commercial fisheries for these fish would improve. Coastal marine fisheries would benefit also because juvenile shad and herring spawned in fresh waters migrate downstream to the ocean and provide an important prey base for other popular fish species, such as red drum, flounder, bluefish and seatrout.

    “The combined effects of increased shad and striped bass populations along with the benefits of an increase forage base for other game fish could potentially generate millions of dollars annually to North Carolina’s economy,” said Mike Wicker of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “River herring and sturgeon, species that are at all time record low numbers, would greatly benefit by once again having access to their historic spawning and nursery area habitats.”

    Nationwide, removal of old and non-functioning dams from rivers and waterways is a growing trend. Many small dams that once provided water power to turn grist mills or saw blades now serve no useful function but block migratory fish from their historic spawning and nursery areas.

    In North Carolina, the removal in 1998 of Quaker Neck Dam on the Neuse River near Raleigh resulted in migratory striped bass and American shad being able to reach their former spawning grounds. Since removal of Quaker Neck Dam, other smaller dams on Little River, a tributary of Neuse River, have reopened many more miles of spawning habitat as well.

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers owns and operates Lock and Dams No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 on the Cape Fear River, and these structures are no longer used for navigation, which was their intended purpose. The Corps is interested in “decommissioning” the dams and is currently studying their options as part of a General Reevaluation Report for the Wilmington Harbor Deepening Project.

    Although the Cape Fear River locks and dams were not designed for water supply, Wilmington, Fayetteville and other local users depend on impounded waters behind these dams for their water supply source. The fishery agencies are committed to working in partnership with these water users and other agencies to find water supply solutions that will satisfy municipal water needs before any of the three Cape Fear River lock and dams are removed.

    State and federal fishery agencies promoting removal of these dams are anxious to work collaboratively with municipalities and citizen groups to restore fisheries habitat in North Carolina’s coastal rivers.

    “The benefits of restoring healthy fish populations in the state’s rivers and streams go far beyond the enjoyment of just catching a fish,” said Bob Curry, chief of the Wildlife Resources Commission’s Division of Inland Fisheries. “They extend to our economy, to our culture and to our dedication to conserving our rich heritage of natural resources.”
     
  2. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz New Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    Very interesting. Thanks for sharing!
     

  3. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    "In North Carolina, the removal in 1998 of Quaker Neck Dam on the Neuse River near Raleigh resulted in migratory striped bass and American shad being able to reach their former spawning grounds. Since removal of Quaker Neck Dam, other smaller dams on Little River, a tributary of Neuse River, have reopened many more miles of spawning habitat as well."

    Well I hate to disagree with you Greg, but it was the removal of the dam in the Neuse that caused the ever so present 1-2 feet of water near Smithfield and Goldsboro. the Neuse had plenty of water before the dam was taken out. The Little River dams in Princeton and Kenly being removed, has pretty much eliminated boat travel due to shallow water and rocks. If that helped the spawning, they must be walking fish, cause they ain't swimming in the places I've seen. I think they will put a hurting on navigation in the "Cape" if they take out those dams. Just my .02
     
  4. greggofish

    greggofish New Member

    Messages:
    214
    State:
    Holly Springs, NC
    good for one is bad for another I guess.

    The Cape Fear should run about like the Roanoke (not quite as deep though) based on topography and current depths.

    The Neuse is shallow the further upstream you go.......parts of it are just naturally shallow....like a lot of the Yadkin, Haw, Eno, etc.

    The day the Stripers can migrate like the Cape Fear like they do in the Roanoke (Weldon) will be a great day. They try in the Neuse but there just isn't enough water up here towards Raleigh. I have seen a few big ones around Milburnie dam but fewer in recent years due to no Spring rain.

    The big Cats will roam in a lot more places as well.

    The Neuse down your way does suck for navigation but as you know, the Cats don't care. I sold my smaller boat so I can't get around down there anymore...gonna miss that actually.

    They can't blow em' up fast enough for me.....:lol: :lol:
     
  5. ponykilr

    ponykilr New Member

    Messages:
    186
    State:
    North Carolina
    neuse river does suck anywhere west of kinston unless we have a lot of rain(like right now:big_smile: )

    i dunno, i dont striper fish in the river, but i hope that there will be enuff water to run a boat...or nobody will be.

    i wish johnston county would build a damn between brogden and smithfield. i think one of these summers, we are gonna run out of water. i have seen the level never get over 8"-18" all summer, thats all that keeps johnston county from thirsting to death.

    arent there damn designs that let fish migrate? seems like i have seen something like that used out west.
     
  6. joe0580

    joe0580 New Member

    Messages:
    228
    State:
    north carolina
    hate to sqy this but i disagree with you. if you take the locks out there will be a water drop of at least 7 to 10 feet. and the river will dry up like crazy. and than here is the question. where will they stop shocking. beacuse the locks are the limits right now and without them you copuld do a lot of damage. right now shad and stripers do get up the river but without heavy rains in spring the fish can not follow the scent trail to get to the correct spawning grounds. plus let think of the homeland security issue. that why the lockmasters have told me and other that locks are not leaveing for at least 10 years.
     
  7. greggofish

    greggofish New Member

    Messages:
    214
    State:
    Holly Springs, NC
    few things....

    1. Cape Fear will never dry up......there are shallow areas now and there were before the locks.

    2. Shocking will be designated by areas, landmarks, county lines whatever they decide. Hopefully the NCWRC takes that opportunity to ban it finally. The locks are just a convenient landmark at the moment.

    3. Dry years definately affect the spawning runs... that's for sure. But that has always been and will always be. Dams affect spawning runs a lot more than low water ever has.

    4. Homeland Security........bunch of terrorists could care less about the Cape Fear to start with and they really don't care about silly locks. Matter of fact, I am pretty sure NC is relatively safe (and I live about 4 minutes from a nuclear plant).

    I say return all of the rivers to their natural state. The overall good outweighs the little bit of bad.


    And finally, lets see if this thread can get bigger that the silly White Catfish thread. The question in that post was answered in the first few responses and somehow 50 some odd posts later.....folks are still yapping about it.

    :roll_eyes: :roll_eyes: :roll_eyes:
     
  8. mack in n.c.

    mack in n.c. Member

    Messages:
    287
    State:
    cary nc
    i have to agree with greggofish on this one.......i dont know for sure..no one does but yes the river will drop......but i think jon boats will still be able to run the river all the way up to fayettevill and possible the rapids at erwin........before the locks were there it was navigable for small vessels.....just not barges ..............i think the homeland security issue is just the corps not wanting to get downsized.....people can say its a national securiy issue but i dont buy it...( i know ill get some replies about the nat security issue but its a small issue at best) ........there jobs are in jeopardy........you take out 3 dams here ...some in the northwest and others and some coe employees will lose there jobs...that means less funding for the corps which as everyone knows no goverment dept want to lose any money..they always want more.......and no the stripers dont use fishways like shad do...........some will use them but most dont........i said this winter in a post that if you have shad and herring that can run (without haveing to go though a fishway) all the way to buckhorn that this is a win win win situation for th cape fear catfish.......and all of us on the boc.......please dont be afraid of taking thes dams out........i grew up on the banks of the haw in burlington...my bedroom window you shoot an arrow in the haw.....ther is a dam just 2 miles up from my mothers house.....i have fished most of my life below all kinds of dams.....3 dams within a bike ride of my moms house......i love to fish dams but some are bad....mack
     
  9. Fishing Fred

    Fishing Fred New Member

    Messages:
    199
    State:
    Lillington, N.C
    This was started back on 01-15-2006 by phillip puryear as Locks and Dams on The Cape Fear. There were only about 17 replys to it. This would be a very good discussion topic if we could get it going again. It should interest anyone that fishes any of our rivers in North Carolina that has any dams on them. Either pro or con we should be concerned with what the effects of keeping dams or removal of them can effect our fishing or resources.
     
  10. Southernraised84

    Southernraised84 New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    Fayettnam, North Carolina
    Iam not sure where i stand on this one. I love the cape how it is but i see how it would be good to get rid of the dams for fishing reasons, but it would take away from the people that get out there with there boats and the kids to have a good time.I cant think of another person that loves that river the way it is more then me (im sure there is tho) its were i learned how to swim fish, the same goes for my dad and his dad and our family going all the way back to befor the civil war.I think they should leave it as is.I could really care less about some shad or strippers or sturgeon and i was under the impression that they locked those fish through while the migrated cuase i have caught strippers as far as the 295 bridge. KEEP THE CAPE AS IS.( i know i said i dont know where i stand but i made my mind up as i was typing this...lol)
     
  11. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    Sounds like a good paln to help your river, restore it to the way it was ment to be.
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Homeland security is adamant about keeping the Cape Fear river navigable.
    They have already dumped alot of money into it.
    Must of us never see it or if we do have no clue what we are seeing but the river is patrolled regularly from Fayetteville to Oak Island by the Coastguard auxillary under the direction of Homeland Security.
    That guy fishing may not really be fishing but may be watching what you do.:cool2:

    I dont think there is any need to worry about those lock and dams going anywhere. I'd be more inclined to think they may be replaced.
     
  13. Southernraised84

    Southernraised84 New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    Fayettnam, North Carolina
    if anything they should just clean up some of the log jams up against the bridges.Just leave the one on the rail road tracks up stream that one has made down stream from it a great spot. Thatsthe only placed i have fished all year thisyear and every time i have went there i have caught fish.Biggest one being a 20 pound blue buti have watched two of my freindshook into some monsters in that spot only to have them break there lines.