Good Flathead Catfish bait or not????

Discussion in 'INDIANA RIVERS TALK' started by OhioRiver, Jul 23, 2009.

  1. OhioRiver

    OhioRiver New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Indiana
    I heard flatheads LOVE mud cats (bullheads). I know where a pond is that is WAYYYYY overstocked with bullheads.. Theres so many that they dont get over 5 inches long each, and theres millions of them in there. Do you think they would make good flathead bait? Im gonna go catch a bunch right now.. or try to lol. Lemme know your thoughts!

    you can take a dip net and scoop a handfull out at a time practically!
     
  2. Harleycat

    Harleycat Member

    Messages:
    397
    State:
    INDIANA
    GOOD BAIT, WERE DID YOU SAY THAT POND IS :wink:
     

  3. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    Very good bait, some would argue they are the best bait!
     
  4. Bomberman

    Bomberman New Member

    Messages:
    703
    State:
    Spring Run, PA
    Can't get much better bait...the are hearty and stay lively a long time. Just send me the GPS coordinates for that pond and I'll help you catch them. :wink:
     
  5. tackleholic

    tackleholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,000
    State:
    New Albany
    I've heard that too. But I've never tried it.
     
  6. skippi2use

    skippi2use New Member

    Messages:
    866
    State:
    Indiana
    be there in a about 10 minutes. LOL
     
  7. Whiskerstalker

    Whiskerstalker New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Hamilton County Indiana
    Bullheads are considered the BEST flatty bait around.
     
  8. CatFighter

    CatFighter New Member

    Messages:
    526
    State:
    Morgantown, WV
    I have definitely heard that mudcats, or bullheads, are good bait. It's also a reason that you seldom catch a large mudcat . . . or any mudcats at when there are flatheads in the area!
     
  9. andrew76

    andrew76 New Member

    Messages:
    457
    State:
    southwest ohio
    Sorry shane , I believe thay r the best bait I caught my pb on a yellow belly.
     
  10. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    you supply the bait i will bring the boat!!!
     
  11. OhioRiver

    OhioRiver New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Indiana
    oh good. At least now I know those darn midgets are good for something! I discovered something in the pond that might be a bad sign for hunting season this year... A dead doe. She looks to have gotten EHD. :angry:
    I know it wont hurt the fish or me, but still.. I hate that disease. I found sooo many big dead bucks 2 years ago that died from that disease, including this one.. 155 inch 15 pointer.
     

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  12. OhioRiver

    OhioRiver New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Indiana
    ... and this 190 inch 22 pointer....:embarassed:
     

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  13. OhioRiver

    OhioRiver New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Indiana
    OH YEAH... If anyone wants to take me fishing, Ill bring enough mud cats for a whole night! :wink: lol
     
  14. Catmanblues

    Catmanblues New Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    State:
    S.E Ohio
    Very good bait indeed an stay moving seems like forever.
     
  15. Catfishboy1995

    Catfishboy1995 New Member

    Messages:
    3,104
    State:
    Council Bluffs
    ONly bait i use all the time...i have them every time i go flathead fishing i get bluegill and goldfish sometimes...What were the gps coordinates to this pond again:wink:
     
  16. Elpy54

    Elpy54 New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    IN
    They like to tangle you around rocks etc so shorten your leader.
     
  17. Whiskerstalker

    Whiskerstalker New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Hamilton County Indiana
    What is EHD????
     
  18. OhioRiver

    OhioRiver New Member

    Messages:
    307
    State:
    Indiana

    Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD)* is common to white-tailed deer, but rarely affects other species. It occurs in the driest part of the year when conditions are just right for biting gnats, the carriers of the disease.
    • The disease is not contagious from one animal to another, and it is not transferable to humans. It comes from a virus carried by biting gnats that live in or near water and wet, muddy areas. It is transmitted to deer that congregate at such watering holes during warm, dry weather.
    • The spread of the disease is usually cut short with colder, wetter weather that spreads deer out and away from gnat-infested areas, or the first hard frost, which will kill the disease-carrying gnats. Since the incubation period for the disease is five to 10 days, afflicted deer may be observed up to a couple of weeks after frost.
    • Deer in the early stages of EHD may appear lethargic, disoriented, lame, or unresponsive to humans. As the disease progresses the deer may have bloody discharge from the nose, lesions or sores on the mouth, and swollen, blue tongues. They become emaciated because they stop eating. Sometimes they even stop drinking, although many die close to or in water.
    • Other wildlife, like mule deer, elk, and bighorn sheep could be exposed to the disease but are usually not stricken like white-tailed deer. No evidence of an outbreak in these species has been found at this time nor in past outbreaks in recent years.
    • Domestic livestock could also be exposed, although cattle and sheep are usually only carriers, not victims, of the "Bluetongue" virus, which is very similar to EHD.
    • Since deer hunting season usually doesn't open until well after the first killing frost, deer hunters usually don't see live, infected animals. However, WDFW recommends hunters avoid shooting and consuming deer that show any EHD symptoms, even though the disease cannot be transmitted to humans.
    • EHD typically strikes in late summer and early fall during an unusually warm, dry year when wildlife concentrates at whatever water is available. Major outbreaks among white-tailed deer have occurred mid-August to mid-October in 1999 in northeast Washington (Spokane, Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan counties), 1998 in southeast Washington along the Snake River, and 1992 in northeast Washington.
    * ("Epizootic" means an animal epidemic. "Hemorrhagic" means to bleed or hemorrhage.)
     
  19. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    want to sell those racks?? :wink:
     
  20. liplifter

    liplifter New Member

    Messages:
    131
    State:
    indiana
    Upper eagle creek off hwy 52/lafayette rd is full of bull heads,a worm and a bobber and a bobber and a worm is all ya need