Gonna try drift fishing for the 1st time.

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by c5killer, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. c5killer

    c5killer New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    West KY
    Thought I'd try this new style in some of my holes and see how it produces. Never done it before, but I've been reading up and studying everything I can find on here! Wish me luck!!

    By the way, what does "PB" stand for when you guys land a hawg?

    Pole bender?

    I haven't got a clue!

    Thanks for all the info guys!
     
  2. great pappy cat

    great pappy cat Active Member

    Messages:
    728
    State:
    P.A
    Personal best:wink:. good luck
     

  3. c5killer

    c5killer New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    West KY
    well DUUHHH!!!

    Now I know!

    Thanks,
    Sean
     
  4. katsandsuds

    katsandsuds New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    North Caro
    The best thing you can do when you start drifting is leave the anchors at home. Drifting is not hard, it just takes some practice to master, but too often guys try it for an hour, they struggle staying on course or keeping the correct speed, or it doesn't put 100 fish in the boat in 10 min's like they are expecting, and they give up on it and go back to anchoring. Give it time, and you will get it down, and it will be second nature with a little practice.
     
  5. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    yea i got my first tast of drifting, it produced three tens and a 15 pound channel, in a few hours, now on a river i dont know but good luck
     
  6. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Sean Welcome to the BOC and the art of drifting. A depth finder is important as well as boat control and speed. With this technique I hope you will be posting about your PB.:wink:
     
  7. c5killer

    c5killer New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    West KY
    Well I do a straight up and down bottom bounce drift now. It produces well I think. I want to try it yall's way and see how I do. I have all the equipment and just finished tying up some rigs. I'll give ya a report tomorrow night or Monday morning.

    Thanks,
    Sean
     
  8. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    Boy, I couldnt agree more. Some of my friends will anchor all night long but only give drifting a hour at most....boy I hate that, LOL.
     
  9. T Man

    T Man New Member

    Messages:
    115
    State:
    Grenada MS
    I got some good bait the other day and ran over to a river to try my hand at drifting I fished about 3 hours caught 3 fish from 15 to 20 and had another fish I couldnt turn he run under a log and couldnt get him back he came un hooked I had a good drifter instruct me (Fishstick) Boat speed I think is most important part It was a fun afternoon fishing
     
  10. gefvxd

    gefvxd New Member

    Messages:
    5
    State:
    Missouri
    so how fast do you want to drift? What rig do you use and do you bounce the weight off the bottom or keep it up a bit?
     
  11. c5killer

    c5killer New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    West KY
    Done a little drifting today. Not sure I was doing it right or not. I sure wore the hell out of my lead sinker. Caught a couple of 5lb channels and a few small blues.

    I have one hole that produces every time, but I don't think I can drift it do to the hang ups. I'm not sure I'm rigging my my lines correctly ( weight of sinkers and stuff). I'm going to need one of those drift socks for sure. I about wore my foot off working that trolling motor.:big_smile:

    I guess practice makes perfect. Only lost one rig and a couple of sinkers.

    Thanks,
    Sean
     
  12. kitsinni

    kitsinni New Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    Ohio
    The hardest part of drifting is boat control and speed control. You have to fight wind and current and keep your course. This is enough trouble to get half the people to give up right off the bat. Practice controlling the boat and you will catch a lot more fish. You want to keep the boat going pretty slow most of the time. Your speed will depend on how you like to fish and what the current is doing. Personally if there is no current of very little I try to move about as slow as I can. If I don't get action I speed it up a bit. If there is a lot of current then you want to drift the baits a bit slower than the current. Once you have the boat control the second hardest thing is knowing where to drift. That you will really only figure out through trial and error. Don't be afraid to drift ways that seem unnatural. I catch a lot of fish drifting sideways across a river. The nice thing about drifting is even if your drifting a poor area you are moving a lot and will probably find some fish. Some people drag baits and some people keep them straight down under the boat. I prefer straight down but to do this perfectly a line counter really helps. If you don't want to use a line counter just figure out how much line your reel takes in per turn let the bait hit the bottom and reel up the right amount. You have to keep your eyes on the fish finder for depth changes, again a line counter makes this really easy. Once you start getting bites at a certain depth try to move a couple poles there. Sometimes they hit right on bottom sometimes 10-15' above bottom. Try whole fish, big baits, small baits, filets, heads and tails. You never know what is the big ticket bait that day.
     
  13. Jeremy Leach

    Jeremy Leach New Member

    Messages:
    428
    State:
    Madison In
    Drifting is a lot easier then people make it out to be. I have seen people just pick a stretch of the river and go and catch all kinds of fish.
     
  14. catfishinsc

    catfishinsc New Member

    Messages:
    507
    State:
    SC
    Are you drifting with river current, or letting the wind push you across a lake?
     
  15. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    I let the wind push me on some days and use the trolling motor on others. I fish lakes mostly. I try to fish between .5 and 1 mile per hour. I fish out the back. I use a carolina rig and sometimes put on a longer leader and a float. If you can afford a drift sock and a trolling motor with auto pilot it makes it a lot easier. I have also caught fish with the pole straight down a couple feet off the bottom. Not as many though. This is my experience just try your own thing and don't give up. I was one of those who kept going back to anchoring now I hardly ever anchor. I do sometimes but I prefer drifting. More water more fish. Plus the fish are used to bait moving. Regardless of what anyone think these fish are used to eating bait that is moving not lying on the bottom. Also how you rig your bait is important. I fillet one side then I cut out the middle gut pocket, slip it on the hook followed by the fillet which adds action. I guarantee you this will out fish chunk bait. I have spent a lot of time experimenting. Also, the big ones like heads but it does not get hit near as often. Hope this helps.
     
  16. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    drift fishing lakes is alot easier than rivers,there's no current to push you around. How do I drift a lake? I find where the river channels are and drift back across them in likely looking spots,usually from shore to shore,when I start hitting fish I check my electronics for depth and bottom make up,and start zeroing in on them, the drifts get shorter and more specifically aimed at the right spots,as you fiqure out where the fish are,once your dialed in you can hit alot of fish. One thing I've found is that if your catching dinks,usually thats what your going to catch in that area,move and find the bigger fish.
     
  17. lancer821

    lancer821 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Texas
    Is there a water temp that drifting becomes less effective than anchoring, say in January and February?
     
  18. lancer821

    lancer821 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    Texas
    Okay, I did some research and found that below 48-50 degrees is the temp some people stop drifting and focus on anchoring or VERY still spider rigging. Going to try this more this winter.
     
  19. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    I drift fish lakes almost exclusively. I know guys that prefer to drift when it gets cold but have heard all sorts of different rules, etc. I know if you do drift when it is cold drift slow as heck. If they are hungry and you drag it to them they will bite it. I have been having a lot of luck with a carolina rig with a peg float on the leader. This keeps it outta the mud. I like to fish right on the bottom, especially when the water cools. These fish will hole up. If you start catching them going through a hole, stop and anchor. I will repeat my drift and hold on the hole myself but I have autopilot and throw out a drift sock as well. A lot of what you do depends on current, wind, and where the baitfish are. I like to drift around outside bends on the old creek/river channels. You don't have to stay right on the channel just stay close and you will see where the fish are. Some days they will bite aggresive and some they will not. Just get out there and keep trying. Put on a little thin piece of a side of shad that will flap around. I also anchor up when it is cold too. I have had luck both ways. It depends on the lake, area, fish, etc. When you figure something out just go with it. Don't sit in one place to long. If you have a warm water area fish around it. It will hold bait. I can go all day on this topic but if you want any more info just pm me. I would be glad to help any way I can.
     
  20. keepitsimple

    keepitsimple New Member

    Messages:
    1,327
    State:
    virginia
    Branj hit it right. I do some serious drifting on our lake. A wind sock is a major plus to control your speed. I will add I watch my graph constantly and set downlines and slip corks at various depths on what I see. On downlines if they need to be set a certain depth, I know 1 turn is 33" and adjust to that, use a egg sinker with enough weight to keep it straight down. Cork pegged carolina rigs are generally no more than 3/4 oz and casted far, less weight will help it bounce over structure.