Glass plant

Discussion in 'LOCAL INDIANA TALK' started by skippi2use, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. skippi2use

    skippi2use New Member

    Messages:
    866
    State:
    Indiana
    Has anyone on here ever worked in a glass plant before. I have gotten my first oppertunity. We are putting wind on the regenerator and the furnace. It is a wonderfull job except it is hot as HELL. I never realized how hot it could possably be. Cant imagine any place hotter although im sure there is. Brings new meaning to roasting chestNUTS on an open fire. Have to where a ton of clothes to be able to stand it. Freeze to death when you come out into 60 something degree temps out side. Just a new experience and thought I would see if anyone else has every had the pleasure.
     
  2. Shad Man

    Shad Man New Member

    Messages:
    785
    State:
    Tyler, TX
    You better save those bad boys . Those twins are going to grow up fast and your going to need some more to look after.:smile2::smile2::smile2::smile2:
     

  3. Fishinfreak

    Fishinfreak Member

    Messages:
    256
    State:
    North Bend,Ohio
    Shane lots of guys look for warm jobs in the winter:smile2: Just not that warm.
     
  4. carp46755

    carp46755 New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    Indiana
    I worked in a glass plant for years. My job was heating the glass and bending it. It was very hot. Around 1100 degrees. I'm glad I changed jobs because they have laid off most of the people that worked there.
     
  5. mintaka

    mintaka Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,467
    State:
    Charlotte , N.C
    In 1999 I worked in one doing something called 'running cuts'.
    It was hot inside and as a result , I passed out a few times.
    Luckily , I no longer work there. I met some guys from Mexico
    who tried to stage a pepper eating contest...left them in the dust!!
    Left the toilet in the dust , too , when I got home.
     
  6. old newbie

    old newbie New Member

    Messages:
    179
    State:
    indiana
    Shane I never worked in a glass factory, but in an electrical plant I made insulators b/4 they went to plastic in the 70's. The parts were pressed from a "dirt" made of clay, cement, and asbestos. We put the green ware in a furnace about 60' long that held 5 loads. Doors on both ends. We were only allowed to shut off the furnace if we were after the middle load, the outside two we had to get with the furnace on.
    When we took a load out we then dipped it in a vat of boiling tar for a period of time then moved it over to a vat of boiling wax to soak again. When that was over we put on the rubber suit and gloves and packed the pieces into boxes to go to assembly.
    I don't remember the temps but I'm sure they didn't approach what your in but they were constant for 8hrs. The plus side your TV dinner was done in 1/2 hr but the asbestos is probably why I haven't smoked in 35 yrs and have emphysema.
     
  7. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Worked at a Norge/Fedders factory in the Porcelain section. It was so hot that you could come to work with a cold/fever and it would be gone by the end of the shift. It would dry you out. I forgot the temp degrees.
     
  8. Catfishhunter

    Catfishhunter New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Lanesville, In.
    I worked at the Nashville glass plant for Ford Motor Co.. We made glass from scratch to the finished product. The main furnaces run at 2500 deg. and at one time we had 3 running side by side.When things went wrong, it was hot as HELL working on them.Do you work for Hot Works?
     
  9. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    TEXAS
    ive never worked in anythign THAT hot

    be careful brotha..no job is worth a heat stroke:wink:

    BE SAFE AND BE AWARE!
     
  10. skippi2use

    skippi2use New Member

    Messages:
    866
    State:
    Indiana
    Man it is hot but we come out and cool and drink lots of water and gatorade. The furnace here is 3800 degrees inside the furnace and the 2 regenerators. Not that hot outside but it is way up there. It is hottest in the port alley and in the throat where it goes from the furnace to the alcove on its way to production. My forman had to craw down in the throat a couple of days ago and came out his out welding jacket cooked. Man the money is terrific though. It is well worth it. It is left up to us when to come out. No one complains about it. Not like we are getting yelled at because we are out cooling off. This is prob. the easiest people I have ever worked for. Really laid back. They are all about safety first and job done right. Never gotta go gotta go.
     
  11. skippi2use

    skippi2use New Member

    Messages:
    866
    State:
    Indiana
    Im not working for hot works. I dont want to say who im working for or where. Just because I dont know how they would feel about it. I know where not supposed to be taking pictures either though. James did the block crack and warp. The block is brand new and already bigging to crack. When we first got there it was all blown out. They have to adjust the jack bolts every hour on the hour. It is really wild looking through there lenses and looking at the flames. They also have infer red thermometer that show the heat and temps over it.
     
  12. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    Freeze, cook, get drenched, dry out all in the same shift in winter. Dirty nasty good payen job. Calcine comes out red to white hot.
     
  13. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    I have worked in a steel foundry and a rotary plastic tank factory before,both were dirty nasty dangerous places to work,got some good burns at the steel foundry and had the tendons broke and ripped out of my right arm from wrist to elbow at the plastic plant,glad i no longer have anything to do with either of them,that was back in the day and todays OHSA would have shut them down before even seeing the inside of the plant,quit the first one and got fired for assaulting the bosses son(manager). little punk jackazz!
     
  14. tackleholic

    tackleholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,000
    State:
    New Albany
    11 years in aluminium extrusions. 450 degrees heat treat ovens (3), 950 degrees billet ovens (3), 2000 degrees die boxes (4), 3 canisters & 1 paint oven. Almost 15 years in food processing, cold cold cold & cold. :confused2:
     
  15. perrycounty.in

    perrycounty.in New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Indiana
    I worked at a foundry, where we made iron. You wanna talk about hot the moltin iron in our department came out of the furnaces at 2700 degrees and we had to work on the recievers and runners with pistol grip chizzle bits to keep them clean just inches over the exposed iron, it took months for your skin to adapt to the temps. If you was a new guy and stuck your arm out over the iron your skin would just bubble up and blister, after getting used to it you could hover over the iron with no problem. Man am I glad i don't work there anymore, it was not quality air to breathe
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2009