Gizzard shad and cold temps

Discussion in 'SOUTH CAROLINA LAKES / RESERVOIRS' started by foothills, Nov 19, 2007.

  1. foothills

    foothills New Member

    Messages:
    437
    State:
    South Carolina
    how do the gizzard shad typically respond to colder temps or a strong cold front...also what do they feed on in the colder months in south carolina lakes/reserviors??
     
  2. pop pop

    pop pop New Member

    Messages:
    972
    State:
    Lake Green
    Foothills I really can,t say . I'm no expert, But we hammered'um in 2 to 3 ft. of water today. I think they move around like most fish. It's just a matter of finding them.:wink:
     

  3. AgentDuder

    AgentDuder New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    South Carolina
    Im kinda new to catching my own bait. I have been using frozen cut bait. How big of net do you use and with how much weight?

    thanks for the help..
     
  4. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    we look for a sandbar that comes from deep water on the downwind side of lakes. This way we can throw and get them deep without having to worry about stumps and brush.
    Sometimes during heat of day we will see them or find them up on the sandbar
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If you're going to be using your net where it's likely to get hung up, you're going to be stuck with using a cheap, lighter net no larger than 5', 6' at the very most. In such spots, the more weight per radius foot, and the larger the net, the more likely you are to get hung up. Open water/clean bottom is another ball game. I'd go with a 10' net, 8' at the smallest. And get a pro/premium model with extra weight. Such nets will have anywhere from 3/4# up to 1 1/3# of weight per radius foot. I checked prices, and a good heavy net will run about $10 per radius foot. The extra weight will cause the net to sink faster, catching you a lot more bait per throw. Just remember not to throw that expensive $80-$100 net where it's got no business being; keep a cheap Wally World net on hand for that, if you're occasionally throwing a net in such places.
     
  6. foothills

    foothills New Member

    Messages:
    437
    State:
    South Carolina
    well when i went out today i caught threads and gizzards in 4 to 8 feet of water...however we have had a stable weather patteren for a few days...with the front that's supposed to move through on thursday into friday i wonder how that will effect the shad and where they go??...will they shallow up or head for deeper haunts??
     
  7. mudkip

    mudkip New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    SC
    Sometimes if the temperature goes down quick they will head deep but I have caught them in less than 10 feet of water in Jan. I use an 8 foot net. If the wind is blowing always check the bank where the waves are hitting. Look for cormarants and heron. Gulls usually signal threadfin shad--I don't want those. Also in deep winter I have to resort to throwing around bridges...this is a good way to get big shad (foot long gizzard) but it is also a good way to trash a net. There is always stuff near bridge pilings (rebar, crappie brushpiles, footings etc). I always take that chance, sometimes I trash a net going for big baits. Don't use a Betts Superpro around a bridge piling:smile2: