Getting Started Fly Fishing

Discussion in 'Fly Fishing' started by Dmitri, Aug 24, 2006.

  1. Dmitri

    Dmitri New Member

    Messages:
    577
    State:
    Illinois
    I know just like all activities and hobbies, top-end equipment can get really expensive, but I am wanting to get into the fly fishing scene. Are there any recommendations for cheap yet durable and effective rods/line/reels, etc...? I saw wal-mart has a 20 dollar fly fishing kit with leader, line, aluminum reel, and a 3 piece either 8 or 9 foot rod. But it is awfully cheap and I don't know if I would trust something like that. I'd really like to get started and try it out though.
     
  2. bigcat_chaser

    bigcat_chaser New Member

    Messages:
    354
    State:
    Cincy, Ohio
    I dont know very much about fly fishing but I think you have to get halfway decent equipment to really find out if ya like it, I have saw the really cheap equipment at wally world and can only say that if I were interested in trying to fly fish I think I would invest in a little better equipment from cabela's or bass pro or something like that you may even be able to find something decent on ebay you really dont need top of the line stuff but dont get the bargain basement stuff either remember ya get what ya pay for no matter what you decide good luck with it hope it works out :smile2:
     

  3. Darrell

    Darrell New Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Illinois
    I started fly fishing about 10 years ago. Like anything else you can catch fish on cheap or expensive gear. Its is all about presentation and knowing the water you fish. I had a guy try to sell me an Orvis rod for $1000. I told him to take it out and lets compare. Sure it had a better feel and was way more sensitive. At the end of the day I still out fished him. I have just at $250 in all of my gear. I would say if you had $150 to $300 in fly fishing gear that is plenty.

    MAJ D
     
  4. field989

    field989 New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    east central indiana
    OK

    #1 VERY GLAD YOUR GETTIN INTO FLY FISHING.... its a BLAST and makes even a little tiny fish seem like a good one!

    #2 i started out with a 20 dollar kit and i moved up to a St. CROIX premier and LOVE IT it casts WAY BETTER AND I JUST LOVE THE THING...
    i bought the combo that has everything in it

    i would suggest u get a few books about the subject

    I REALLY LIKE L.L. BEANS book about fly fishing its written by dave whitlock and is a great book

    as for suppliers i can give u 2 VERY GOOD SUPPLIERS and one i bought the kit and a ton of fly tying stuff off of

    so just shoot me a PM if u want those websites

    my rod is a 5wt but that first one was a 8 wt...

    i would suggest maybe a 6-8wt rod for a beginner and definately weight forward line.... but if u buy a combo it will come with it ( not the wal mart ones there just straight taper which is inferrior IMO)


    also fly tying is a TON OF FUN ALSO AND IT REALLY GIVES U A SENCE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT WHEN U CATCH A FISH ON A FLY U TIED....

    any more questions please ask!


    Jeff
     
  5. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    One very critical thing is to always match you line and leader to your rod. This can be a very expensive sport. If you are like me, I only fly fish now and then, so it's not worth investing in rods of every length.

    My favorite rod is a six-foot 6X rod outfitted with 6WF line. I bought the Scientific Angler line kit and have been pleased with it. I have a nine-footer, but it is not as convenient even though it casts farther. Around here, the small stream with tree-lined banks make the shorter rods more effective. I'll keep the nine-footer for the trips out West!

    Good luck!
     
  6. wooleybugger

    wooleybugger New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Missouri
    Best tip go find a good fly shop around and talk to them most of them are really decent people and love helping others out. Start out on a 6 weight or so dont try to go to light. Orvis makes a really good starter rod called a clearwater get that in a six weight and just keep on throwing it. It takes a while but youll get the hang of it
     
  7. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    I read an outstanding tip for fly fishing: never wait until you're on the river bank to start practicing!

    I used the lightest split shot in my tackle box to approximate the weight of the fly. I then practiced until I didn't have to look back and the shot landed where I wanted it. I highly recommend the shot in place of the fly--sure can save you from hooking your ear! :embarassed:

    The six weight forward (6WF) is good for beginners because it concentrates the weight of the fly line toward the leader. The only problem is finesse; without a doubt you'll pull out the leader, but not enough line to counterbalance the line on your rod. Then all of the line will sink toward the reel, and there you are, in front of God and everybody, trying to untangle yourself--not exactly art-form quality! You'll quickly learn that you have to have at least enough line deployed to match the length of your rod.

    Finally, the best length for your rod is a matter of choice. I like the six-foot length for around here, but I have a mentor that uses an eight-footer back in the most dense cover. Considering he out-fishes me ten to one...
     
  8. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN
    I'm marking this thread to return and get email updates to it, as this is something I've been wanting to do for a few years now. I know a man, who personally loves it, and speaks highly of it. Wish he gave lessons.

    Thanks for an enlightening thread!

    Take care.
    Cheryl
     
  9. Dmitri

    Dmitri New Member

    Messages:
    577
    State:
    Illinois
    Thanks again guys. I've looked on ebay but a lot of the stuff there seems really high priced. I'm going to check out the local hunting/fishing place to see if they carry anything in the line of fly rods, which I doubt it, seeing as how there aren't a lot of places very near that would be good for fly fishing.
     
  10. thomcat

    thomcat New Member

    Messages:
    375
    State:
    pennsylvania 17745
    if your gonna spent some money, dont buy at wal-mart,,, regular fishin rods ok, but not flyrods.. go to cabelas outfitter or get cabelas flyfishn catalogue... there is some reasonable and quality stuff in there... I use a 9' diawa algonquin with an air frame reel... man you can fire your line about 50' the most i got out in 1 cast was about 35'
     
  11. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Hey- that Airframe thats an OKUMA. I use the same reel! It's AWESOME! The drag system is the best I have ever used bar none! I bought that over an Orvis large arbor Battenkill. Cheaper too!

    I like that St.Croix Steelhead rod in your avatar! Very nice stuff!:cool2:
     
  12. Dmitri

    Dmitri New Member

    Messages:
    577
    State:
    Illinois
    Looks like I will check out the Cabela's catalog and see what I can find. Hmm...I suppose Bass pro might also carry quality flyrods?
     
  13. Bengalfan79

    Bengalfan79 New Member

    Messages:
    16
    State:
    Alexandria, KY(CincyArea)
    This past Spring I was thinking the same way you are and went to walmart and got the $20 Shakespeare kit and went and caught fish the next day. I had never fly fished before. It is very fun to catch bluegill and bass in my area because there are no trout around in our streams. Good luck out there.
     
  14. Urban Fly Fisher

    Urban Fly Fisher New Member

    Messages:
    12
    State:
    Ohio
    Bass Pro carries the Hobbs Creek and Classic series that would probably be up your alley. Combos can range from $100-$200, depending on model and series. Each comes with a reel already spooled with backing, fly line, leader, and tippet. Tie a simple yarn fly to your tippet and you're ready to practice casting.

    The quality of the fly line and rod are the two most important components of any fly fishing system. With that said, you don't need top flight gear when you're starting out, nor will it help you catch more fish. It's perfectly acceptable to develop your technique on moderately priced equipment. Also, in fly fishing, your reel, for lack of a better name, is basically a line holder. Unless you're chasing steelheads or salmon up north, or tacking tarpon down south, where those fish will make long, powerful runs, there is no reason to spend a pile of money on a fly reel. A single action drag, such as on the Pflueger Medalist, will work fine. This reel has served me well against northeastern and midwestern smallmouth bass and doesn't cost more than $35.

    The art of fly fishing is much more enjoyable with smooth, fundamentally sound casting technique. Nothing can replace casting lessons with a FFF certified casting instructor. Having somebody there to help you break down and analyze your cast is invaluable. However, if such instruction is not available, there are a number of books and videos worth checking out. I'm a big fan of Joan Wulff's approach to fly fishing. Her book, Fly Fishing Techniques, and DVD, Dynamics of Fly Casting are great resources for beginners and advanced casters alike.
     
  15. UncleD

    UncleD New Member

    Messages:
    11
    State:
    Lafayette, Loui
    I too have been entertaining the idea of Fly Fishing. Still puzzled about rod sizes though, seems each website I went to suggested different rods for the same type fish -- anywhere from 3 wt to 6 wt. for bluegill and other sunfish.

    So what would be a good rod-line weight system to start with?
     
  16. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    How about this. 9' flyrod and decent reel and a 5 wt. line weighted forward. Thats what I learned on. I think it was a Martin Caddis Creek and I got it at walmart for around 55.00.
     
  17. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    Bass pro sells a good starter rod they will help you get started:smile2:
     
  18. ripley311

    ripley311 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    COLORADO
    I got the $55 setup at walmart too. I seems to be an alright setup to learn on. A more expensive setup would surely be better but I would give the $50 setup a try first. If you don't like it your only out 50 and if you get good you can get better equipment. then you still have an alright backup for only 50.
     
  19. buddah

    buddah New Member

    Messages:
    1,622
    State:
    Pennsylvania Wi
    Don't let the name spook you but St.Croixs' Premier line is exellent stuff and very affordable. Worth takin' a look if I were you.:wink:
     
  20. adam j

    adam j New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    ohio
    Just getting started I recommend getting a rod and reel combo from cabela's. Thats gonna be the best bang for the buck. If bass pro offers combos that would probably be a good bet to. Fly fishing is the most expensive form of fishing but it doesn't have to be. Buy the best you can afford and work your way up if you really enjoy it. Fly fishing is like a whole new sport unto itself, it's highly addicting! Problem is other flyfisherman are few and far in between. Hook up with someone else thats already into it and read everything that you can get your hands on.
    You won't be dissapointed. Only one sound as sweet as a clicker going out is getting a fish on your fly reel out to your backing.