Getting bluegill after dark

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by slikk03, Oct 10, 2008.

  1. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    i got a big problem its getting darker early, i went out at 6 and t git dark, the bluegill shut off and i had to go home, how can you get thgem in the dark
     
  2. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    I am with you, sometimes i try small pieces of nightcrawler but the action is pretty darn slow. Thanks for the post. We will see if there is a secret.
     

  3. Da Chummer

    Da Chummer New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Arizona
    I'll park the boat and walk up and down the shore line casting a throw net. I get gills, carp and shad this way. Along with the occasional gold and bronze sunfish. :wink:
    Just gotta watch out for the rattle snakes.
     
  4. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    MAKE SURE CAST NETTING FOR GILLS IS LEGAL BEFORE YOU DO IT

    Here in Iowa we are not allowed to net gills...

    I might suggest setting up a live tank at home? Stock up on the weekends and fish all week when it is too dark to get bait!

    Either that or switch up baits, you have shad, skip jacks, herrings, carp, suckers ect that can all be netted legally in most places...

    Tight lines and good luck!
     
  5. Da Chummer

    Da Chummer New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Arizona
    I MADE SURE I READ THE ILLINOIS RULES ON CAST NETS BEFORE I POSTED. THANKS :wink:
     
  6. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    Nice job bro... just wanted to make sure no one was getting in trouble!!! :wink:
     
  7. Da Chummer

    Da Chummer New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Arizona
    I hear ya. I would never want to cause anybody or myself to be in trouble with the DNR. Could you imagine loosing your fishing license. I'd cry.
     
  8. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    I am afraid I would do more then cry... :sad2: Would not be a good situation, especially if it were strictly by accident... DNR doesn't take Opps all too lightly.. atleast not as fast as they take your gear and vehicle around here...
     
  9. Bacardipr05

    Bacardipr05 New Member

    Messages:
    1,424
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    Unfortunate truth about the fall it is starting to get dark here around 6:30. I have a bait tank set up and have some reserves. One thing that work for me last week was to fish deeper. I casted over to the edge looking for any falling leaves or branches they tend to hide under. I also was using a chartreuse color bait at night. It seem to have increased my catch rate. :0a26:
     
  10. thecatman

    thecatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,763
    State:
    Graham, Texas,
    red worms work wonders on gills
     
  11. MichaelP

    MichaelP New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Arizona
    I like to use a cast net at night as well. Ive caught all kinds of weird stuff.
     
  12. Da Chummer

    Da Chummer New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    Arizona
    So you're saying "there is nothing like being really buzzed and walking up n down the shore chucking out the net and tripping out on what you catch" ? :smile2:
     
  13. Katatonik

    Katatonik New Member

    Messages:
    1,262
    State:
    Ogden, Kansas,
    I thin he jus' said that, Chum.
     
  14. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    Thanks guys i have i more tactic when i am short on live bait thank you
     
  15. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    I have always thought bluegills are small and they are preyed upon by
    by larger fish. I don't know weather they can't see as well or just more
    predator fish are more active at night, for what ever reason bluegills
    are not very active at night.
     
  16. MichaelP

    MichaelP New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Arizona
    Yeah, you dont know how many times Ive fallen in and twisted my ankle. Wait, Im sure you do. I caught one of those ugly assed algae eaters they sell at pet stores that was like 10 inches long. a placostamus or whatever you call them. I caught the biggest waterdog Ive ever seen at pleasant. I caught a huge bass, bigger than any one Ive ever caught on rod and reel at canyon under the bridge.
     
  17. Flamekeeper

    Flamekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    State:
    Louisville, Ken
    Try 10-20' out from the bank on ponds and lakes,about 2-1/2-3' deep.Bluegills seem to go out and suspend in deeper water and will tear up large wax-worms.

    I think they move out because the bigger fish move in :smile2: To feed of course. I use one of them quarter size ( neon green floats ) with the lead weight ring with no weight on the 6-8# mono 2-3' in lenght with a#10 gama.

    It will take a few seconds for it to float down naturally, but proven itself deadly on the bluegill day or night..:wink:
     
  18. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    a few months back i sat on the bank and caught a bucket full. after dark i lit the lantern and continued to catch them. slower but still pretty good. with bobber and worm chunks.
     
  19. fishnfwl

    fishnfwl New Member

    Messages:
    3,334
    State:
    South Cent
    Round here I agree with ya Jer, I will either fish them under a pole light or drop the green light in just a little before dark and they seem to hang out, after dark it seems to take about 20-30 minutes but they will show up to the light
     
  20. catter62

    catter62 New Member

    Messages:
    153
    State:
    texas
    Another method that can be effective if your water depth and other conditions are right, is to seine them. Again, only if legal in your State. This can be especially productive in the Spring when they are nesting in shallow water.