German Short-hairs dogs

Discussion in 'Hunting Dogs Talk' started by JMarrs328, May 15, 2006.

  1. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    Does anyone raise short-hairs? MY bitch is coming into heat for the 2nd time and I'm thinking about breeding her. Does anyone have any experience who can help me make some deccisions? Any help is greatly appreciated!!!:big_smile:
     
  2. Ol Man

    Ol Man New Member

    Messages:
    3,170
    State:
    Illinois
    I really think *you* should stop thinking about breeding her and find someone that has a male shorthair...:lol:

    What is the difference between a Harley and a Hoover? ~~~The position of the dirt bag.
     

  3. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    You know what I meant!!!! Pervert!!:big_smile:
     
  4. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Josh with all due respect, please leave the breeding to the experts. I too was temptedTo breed My Elhew line English Pointer, but after much thought and study, decided against it.

    only expert breeders know enough about genetics and dog breeding to know what dogs to mate up, to end up with an excelent litter of hunting dogs. with too much amatuer breeding The traits that we all look for in our hunting dogs begin to get watered down and in the end You wind up with a poor performing dog. These expert breeders have worked long and hard to refine the dogs that We hunt behind today. To end up with a happy healty dog thats all buisness in the field lots of knoweledge and tough decisions. most dog owners/ handlers are to biased to admit that the dog they hunt behind would most likey be taken out of the breeding stock By most pro breeders.
     
  5. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    My grandfather has bread pointers for over 50 years. He is going to be very involved with this, I was just looking for any info. I can get; I'm always curious.
     
  6. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    Glad to hear that you have access to an expert (Grandpa) I think My post came across a little harsh unintentionaly. I've just seen too many amatuer breeders end up taking pups to the pound......I don't think anyone wants to see that happen.

    Did your Grandpa breed GSP or english pointers?
     
  7. shortshank

    shortshank New Member

    Messages:
    389
    State:
    Oregon
    I raised and trained AKC registered shorthairs for 15 years. Let me begin by saying your female is 70%+ what your pups will be. There is a lot of information I would recommend you consider before making your final choice. First do you like the way your female hunts? Does she range out far enough to suit you? Is she "steady to wing and shot"? Does she "honor" another dog on point? Do you know anything about her litter mates? Did any of them make bird dogs? Any history of health issues? What about color of your dog and litter mates? Is your dog mostly all white with a small patch or spot of brown? What are the possibilities of having almost all dark brown pups vs mostly white with brown spots? These questions for the most part you can answer from her history. Having said all that when you consider the male you want to match your females strongest points with the sires' strongest points. Does he stand well up on his feet & toes? His disposition in company, is he ready to hunt or fight? His color, mostly white with a few brown spots, or almost all dark brown? His medical history, any "cryptorchism"?
    If there is PASS him by. Always try to improve on your dogs strong points. The same should be said for her bad points. Her genes will be dominate in the outcome of your breeding. It seems natural to assume if you breed her with a male that has similar problems, they will be magnified in the pups. If you like the darker pups, you may have to breed one of your pups. I had a male that I bred to get that was almost all brown. It took me three generations to get him. When your pups are born they will be white and brown. Some may have a lite blue haze, those will be the darkest of the litter. Rub their hair on their bodys backwards and you can see the dark below. I called my dog Patch, because all the dark brown grew together. I loved him and I miss him. I've got a host of training tips I would be glad to share with anyone on these shorthairs. Hope this helps!
    Don
     
  8. shortshank

    shortshank New Member

    Messages:
    389
    State:
    Oregon
    Trying to upload a couple pictures of my pup and his litter mates.
    It says it worked?
     

    Attached Files:

  9. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    Hey breed Germans
     
  10. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    What do you find to be desireable, the mostly brown, or mostly white? Mine mostly brown, with only a little white on her belly and down her legs. I'll try to get some pictures posted. She is also smaller than a lot of GSPs I've seen, her mother wasn't real big either. I'll get some pics up tomorrow I guess.
     
  11. shortshank

    shortshank New Member

    Messages:
    389
    State:
    Oregon
    Josh all I can say is do you like ABU reels or Penn? It's just what ever makes you happy. I wanted a male, dark male of my own breeding/blood line. I believe most females are first, smarter-easier to train-smaller than males. I'm sure Grandpa will be a great help to you with this. I've known guys that crossed Airdales with their shorthairs. What a terrible thing to do when you are trying to improve a bloodline. The pictures I included starts another quarrel among breeders & trainers. I started working my pups at 6 weeks old. Some say let them alone until they are 8-12 months old. What works for you, your bloodline is the best option.
    Don
     
  12. RPnKC

    RPnKC New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Kansas
    Josh pay attention to this wisdom, Brad K. is speaking the truth.
    Didn't it take Bob Wehle 50 years to make the Elhew line what it is?
    Our family bred cattle for specific bloodlines to maintain the "purity" of a certain line and made substaintial efforts to keep people from dilluting the breed unmercifully because of the trend and buyers interest at the time. I learned alot during those years.