Gar Giggin

Discussion in 'Gar Fishing' started by Switchback XT, Nov 25, 2006.

  1. Switchback XT

    Switchback XT New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    MS
    Anybody ever been gar giggin? I stalk them in shallow water and throw a gig several yards into the floating prey. Just wondering if I'm the only one doing this.
     
  2. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Don't see much sense in gigging them unless you are going to eat them. But, that's me. I don't like to kill what I can't eat or is not a threat to me or mine.
     

  3. Switchback XT

    Switchback XT New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    MS
    Yea i see where you are coming from, but gar are a nuisance fish and do affect native fish populations. But i do give a lot of them away to people that like to eat them.
     
  4. StuBone278

    StuBone278 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    State:
    south central Louisiana
    YEAH MAN!
    I even got some video of it. We didn't really "gig" them, we used steel rakes and "raked them in" haha. Then we tried to bare hand them in...talk about a feat! They were just too slippery and we had no gloves so... Well the ones that we did stab we ended up putting back into the pond and they swam away seemingly unaffected.

    Too bad that pond with the gar got drained a few months ago...:angry: I was looking forward to catching some HUGE spotted gar on the fly rod. I think we had got one that weighed around 6-7 pounds while "raking"
     
  5. Catmansc2006

    Catmansc2006 New Member

    Messages:
    27
    State:
    Virginia
    I beg to differ. Gar are NOT a nuisance fish. They are a native fish to American waters and are the second biggest freshwater fish in America. While they do prey on all types of fish, so do bass, cats, walleye, pike etc. They can be caught, released, or used for food. They native americans consider them a prime fish to eat. They are slow growers also, just like sturgeon. A gar weighting 100 lbs is at least 75 to 100 years old. They do not have that many young, so they can be easliy overfished. I hate to see my children grow up where they could NOT possible catch a fish weighting greater than 250 lbs.I dont about the rest of you, but I would love the chance of catching a fish that could weight up to 300 lbs. Get rid of the Gar then we will have lost a great fighting fish for future generations to enjoy. :angry:
     
  6. Switchback XT

    Switchback XT New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    MS
    Don, thanks for the insight. I guess we should all practice more catch and release methods for future generations to enjoy.
     
  7. StuBone278

    StuBone278 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    State:
    south central Louisiana
    Sorry man, we gigged spotted gar.... definately spotted gar. There is no shortage of them (spotted) down here, I haven't seen nearly as many alligator gar, though I know there's some huge ones down here.

    Also, I saw another fish while we were gigging these, thought it was a catfish, so I was about to noodle one for the first time. I then realized while my hand was in the water that it was in fact a choupique (bowfin)...that would NOT have been good, as those things have a mouth full of teeth!! Man I'm glad I didn't try to noodle it!!:lol:
     
  8. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    As Don said, gar are no threat to game fish. They mostly go after either dead or dying fish, or what most of us call rough fish, especially drum and buffalo. Of course, I don't thing drum are always rough fish, pretty good fighters and cooked fresh, taste good too. I see no reason to kill what you are not going to eat, but to each his own.