For older outboards that have not been run for awhile.

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by Bubbakat, Feb 4, 2006.

  1. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Awakening a Sleeping Outboard


    I see a lot of posts from folks who have a motor that has been in storage, belonged to their dad or granddad, or for another reason. I recently went through most of these steps myself in preparing a motor which hadn’t been used for 15 years. Following is an attempt to provide a concise list of steps.

    a reference book is a must. Although some folks use Seloc or Clymer manuals, they cover a range of engines and sometimes details are omitted. The reprints of the original OMC manuals are the most specific to your particular engine. Get one of them.

    If any steps prove challenging or if there are questions about any of the processes, post a question in the applicable forum here at BOC You will receive an answer from one or more of the many experienced veterans here.

    Let’s get started.

    Lower Unit – Remove the prop and any fishing line that may be tangled, wound around the prop shaft. If the shaft is splined, apply a coat of marine bearing grease to it before re-installing the prop. If an inspection of the prop indicates any damage that could cause a vibration or imbalance, replace it or have it repaired. The rubber bushing securing the hub to the prop itself may also need replacing, but that probably cannot be determined until boat-tested.

    Remove the drain screw (bottom) from the lower unit and observe the quality of the lube as it exits. If it is milky, there has been water intrusion. If you observe metal shards, there may be gear damage requiring a re-build of the lower unit. If it is empty, there may be other problems. Remove the vent screw (top screw) to allow complete draining. If none of the above mentioned situations exists, fill with lube from the bottom screw hole until lube emerges from the vent hole. Lube should be available from any oil outlet and labeled as suitable for outboard lower units.

    Note: Electric shift lower units require different lube than manual shift units. Check your manual.

    After unit has been filled, replace vent screw using an appropriate new screw-head
    gasket. Then do the same for the fill screw, trying to prevent as little loss of lube as possible.

    Water Pump – Using your manual as a reference, replace the water pump – if not the complete pump, by all means replace the rubber impeller. This is absolutely necessary on motors of unknown history or on motors that haven’t had a new one in a couple of years. Before re-assembling mid-section (lower leg), see next step.

    Cylinder Walls – If not already, lay the motor so the sparkplugs are up. Remove them and put in a few squirts from an oil can filled with TCW-3 oil. Move the engine around so that the oil will contact cylinder walls. Allow it to soak for a day or two. By hand, rotate the flywheel a couple of times. If it resists rotating, allow to soak longer. When flywheel finally rotates freely, install new sparkplugs.

    Spark – Pull the plug wires from the sparkplugs. Your spark should jump a minimum of a 3/8" gap with a hot thick spark. If it doesn’t, you need maintenance on the ignition system. Check the sparkplug cables for cracked insulation. Otherwise, the needed maintenance will be determined by type and year of motor you’re working on. Refer to your manual. Replace the spark plugs with the manufacturer's recommended plugs, keeping the old ones as spares.

    Wiring – Check all engine wiring for brittle insulation or fraying. This would necessitate re-wiring or installation of a new wiring harness.

    Lubrication – Lube all moving parts including throttle linkage (white lithium) and steering shaft (chassis lube is OK).

    Carburetors – Remove and disassemble carburetor(s). Soak in carb. cleaner or spray with aerosol carb. cleaner, paying particular attention to all small passages and fuel-ways. Blow dry with compressed air, again, paying particular attention to internal passages. Reassemble using an appropriate carburetor rebuild kit. If kit doesn't include a new needle and seat, get one. If the float is cork, replace it with a plastic one. Some kits include them. If the float is plastic, make sure the integrity has not been compromised. Re-install and link and sync according to your manual. Replace all under-cowl fuel lines.

    Fuel pump – Using your manual as reference, remove fuel pump and clean metal parts with carb. cleaner. Install a new fuel pump kit, or replace fuel pump entirely. Replace fuel filter and any vacuum hoses that may be connected.

    Fuel tank – Replace the fuel line along with the squeeze bulb (OEM bulb preferred). Note: on dual-line tank, there is no squeeze bulb. Drain fuel tank. With a flashlight, inspect for dirt, debris, or rust. If OK, rinse and refill with correct fuel/oil mix. If there are quick release connectors on the fuel lines, check the small o-rings at either end. Replace if necessary.

    Controls - If remote control, check throttle and gearshift cables for proper operation. Mine were frayed and rusted and had to be replaced.

    Carburetor Adjustment - For those small Johnson, Evinrude, and Gale motors with adjustable jets.
    (Carburetor Adjustment - Single S/S Adjustable Needle Valve)


    Initial setting is: Slow speed = seat gently, then open 1-1/2 turns.

    Start engine and set the rpms to where it just stays running. In segments of 1/8 turns, start to turn the S/S needle valve in. Wait a few seconds for the engine to respond. As you turn the valve in, the rpms will increase. Lower the rpms again to where the engine will just stay running.

    Eventually you'll hit the point where the engine wants to die out or it will spit back (sounds like a mild backfire). At that point, back out the valve 1/4 turn. Within that 1/4 turn, you'll find the smoothest slow speed setting.

    Note: As a final double check setting of the slow speed valve(s), if the engine has more than one carburetor, do not attempt to gradually adjust all of the valves/carburetors at the same time. Do one at a time until you hit the above response (die out or spit back), then go on to the next valve/carburetor. It may be necessary to back out "all" of the slow speed adjustable needle valves 1/8 turn before doing this final adjustment due to the fact that one of the valves might be initially set ever so slightly lean.

    When you have finished the above adjustment, you will have no reason to move them again unless the carburetor fouls/gums up from sitting, in which case you would be required to remove, clean, and rebuild the carburetor anyway.

    (High Speed Adjustments)
    At full throttle, with the proper size screwdriver, slowly start turning one of the H/S needles in segments of 1/8 turn, waiting momentarily for the engine to respond, then repeat turning. You will reach a point where the engine will start to die out. At that point, back that needle valve out approximately 1/4 turn. Now, go to the other High Speed needle valve and repeat that procedure. At some point in that 1/4 turn out, you will find the smoothest high speed setting (you can now lower the throttle rpm). That will have both high speed needle valves set correctly, and at that point you can lift that center lever adjustment of that high ridge, keeping it lifted until the point is facing the engine, then lower it into its proper position. (When you turn that lever now, you're adjusting both High Speed needle valves at the same time.)
     
  2. Mutt

    Mutt Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    19,207
    State:
    Ca
    Name:
    Mutt
    good post bubbakat thanks. printed it out and going to give it to a friend of mine that bought himself a older motor last week.
     

  3. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Thanks Mutt I spent nearly a year compiling that article and hope some one gets some use out of it.

    I only wish I knew these steps back in the sixties when I ruined several good motors.

    Trial and error doesn't work in two strokes:)
     
  4. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Excelent information Bubba, excelent job! I have an older motor, 70's! I have the seloc and the original shop manual. They are both handy to me! The shop manual makes certain assumptions that you already know certain proceadures. If you are like me (shade tree mechcanic) The seloc manual fills in the holes. I highly recomend you get both manuals! A parts manual for your engine is also a good idea to have, especially if you check ebay for deals!
     
  5. RRaider

    RRaider Guest

    Great post! I'll be picking up a boat and outboard that has been sitting for 7 years so this is just what I was looking for!
     
  6. cook

    cook New Member

    Messages:
    1,494
    State:
    Plattsburg,Mo.(near K.C.)
    Ditto!Just saved this to favorites.
     
  7. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    I bought a 20 johnson one time from my brother in law, and he had loaned it out to a friend who did something to it. When I got it from him, it was stuck. I mixed up a concoction of solvents and oils ect. I put the motor on it's nose and propped it so it was level with plug holes up, and then poured the cylinders full as I could get them. I let it soak for a day, and tried to rock the flywheel back and forth. I did this for 2 days, and finally got some movement, I just kept adding the concoction to it and finally I got it to turn over a full turn. I just kept at it. One note is you can not force it thru the rough spots, easy does it, and a whole lot of patience is needed. I would keep on rocking the flywheel back and forth and eventually the rough went away, and then I started pulling the starter rope, all of the time making sure the cylinders were well lubricated. I also went over the entire engine replacing and cleaning ect, when I finally got it to run, I was able to start it cold on 3 pulls, and warm a 1/2 pull. This 20 turned out to be an excellent motor. When I went to sell it, he wanted it back, said he had owned that boat/motor for 10 years, and it had never run that good.
     
  8. 1sporticus

    1sporticus Active Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    State:
    Iowa
    everyone who owns a boat should be aware of the things Bubba is saying, whether you do your own work or not. You may have to depend on this knowledge to get you home sometime. Being stuck out on the river in a storm with a boat that won't run is a very unpleasant experience, and it'll make you pay attention to details. Great article Bubba.
     
  9. TeamCatHazzard

    TeamCatHazzard New Member

    Messages:
    517
    State:
    Illinois
    BubbaCat, great post man that is some good info and will be put to good use. I have a couple buddies with old motors lying around and I will print that out and give it to them as well. Thanks for your hard work!
     
  10. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Willard, this was an excellent post Sir, Saved it to my favorites, I'm still trying to find time to jump into my lil 15 hp. Thanks for the advice.
     
  11. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Tennessee
    Bubbakat, iboats has this exact article on their site and they're giving credit to a fellow who calls himself "boatbuoy". You may want to check it out so you can get proper credit. Look in the FAQ section of the forums.
     
  12. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Him and I worked togeather on that this last year. No problem with me.
     
  13. Matt Smith

    Matt Smith New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Tennessee
    Good deal! I have a question in that case. My 25 Evinrude needs to be decarbed. I bought a can of SeaFoam today to put in the gas. From what I've read on the 'net, I'm supposed to pour the whole can into 3/4 gallon of gas, along with the appropriate amount of oil. The problem is that it will take about 3 hours for me to use that gas up. Since the 3/4 gallon is reccomended for 6 cylinder motors, can I break the amount of gas down to a 1/4 gallon? Will it still do the job?

    Also, is there a way this thread can be added to the library? I searched for it there, and obviously never found it.
     
  14. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Yes Matt go ahead and break it down to 1/4 gal. It won't hurt any thing because sea foam is oil based.
    Its just going to smoke a little more. I keep it in my fuel all the time. Its a good cleaner and stabilizer
     
  15. APD1146

    APD1146 New Member

    Messages:
    176
    State:
    New York
    Thanks bubbakat.
    That was indeed a great informative article. :) I have a 50 hp johnson that I have not run in a while now and this info will save me a lot of trouble re-starting it. Dad also has a little 5 hp Sears motor that I need to work on and this is a godsend to me. Everyone should be glad there are people out there like yourself that has the ability to help others.

    Do you know of anyone or yourself that can help locate manuals for these older motors. I don't mean general purpose, but possibility the original manuals for dome of these motors. :sad:

    Thanks; John from NY
     
  16. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Sure I do I will look up the link and pm it to you.
     
  17. APD1146

    APD1146 New Member

    Messages:
    176
    State:
    New York
    Hey, thanks that would be great. Since I'm new to using this site as I have not made many posting, how do I get back to this site or thread if you will after it is closed ?
    I can be reached at roboco@localnet.com if needed by yourself or others.
    As long as you have been kind enough to help this far, I have another problem. One of my boats, a 24 pontoon with a 1992 Foce 70 hp has a problem. It has always been a little hard starting but now will not start at all. It try's to turn over but won't. I thought it was the starter but replaced it to no avail. She trys to turn over but then she stops and the starter is hot as hell. I'm beginning to think she jumped timing. IDEAS ?
     
  18. APD1146

    APD1146 New Member

    Messages:
    176
    State:
    New York
    Hey bubbakat;
    On the 23rd of March you said you could help me find a source for a manual for my 1991 Force 3 cyc. 70 hp motor. I have a general manual for this motor but it does not tell me any real information on the particular engine I own for tear down or repair. I hope I'm making myself clear. You said you could look up a source and sent it to me in an e-mail. I hope I'm right on that. If you did sent it I apolige because I never got it.
    As long as we are at it I need a service manual for my 1965 Mercury stearn drive 110 HP. I had problems getting it running for an uncoming trip to Santee-Cooper. With the general manual that cost me $39.00 I was able to get enough general info to get it running again, but it is again a general manual. No real info on tear down or trouble shooting.
    Can you help please? Please?
    Thanking you in advance my BOC brother.
    Robocop@localnet.com
     
  19. sniderr1974

    sniderr1974 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Washington
    Bubba,

    I'm new to this site and this post answers exactly what I had just posted about a 1958 59 Evinrude I just got out of storage. Thanks for the info. I'll definately keep this for future reference.

    Kyle
     
  20. BILLYP

    BILLYP New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Fayetteville, North Carol
    Bubba,
    Hey yeah it billy again. This post has came in handy with the 1952 25hp Evinrude that I got this winter. Thanks and since I don't have a computer when I work on the motor I printed it off. THANKS BUDDY.