Flooring A Jon Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Modification Journal' started by tnfishman, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. tnfishman

    tnfishman New Member

    Messages:
    53
    State:
    tennessee
    My wife has very weak ankles and they cause her a lot of pain. She likes to fish as much as any one but the floor ribs in our jon boat make it almost impossible for her to get around. I have purchased several pieces of very thin aluminum plate and plan on using builders insulating foam and a 1/8" piece of light weight rubber between the ribs to support the aluminum pieces. Will pop rivit the aluminum to the top of the ribs. I will then carpet the aluminum floor with marine carpet.
    Has anyone tried anything like this before? If so how did it work out?
     
  2. zivetor

    zivetor New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Charleston, S.C.
    No I havent used Aluminum, but I have used 1/4 treated plywood. It is much cheaper, quick, and I can take it out very easy to wash out the bottom of the boat if needed. I did carpet the platform I built, it was very easy.. If you feel like doing it this way let me know and I will send you the info.. Here are some pictures for now.. :cool2:

    I got my ideas from this link here.. http://www.myjonboat.com Send me a private message if you want more info. I don't want to break the BOC Rules and say or write the wrong thing.



    Zivetor.
     

    Attached Files:


  3. zivetor

    zivetor New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Charleston, S.C.
    Here is a couple of more pictures after the Modifications were semi-complete. I say semi, because you will always be making modifications to your boat to suit your needs.. Its awesome.. My wife was very pleased with the upgrades.. But I understand about floor ribs.. It is a pain. Just so you know, I didn't put anything underneath the plywood for insulation. I just pull the floor out when ever I need to clean or modify something. You can see the pole holders and Anchor Mate I put on the BOW Platform. I also have a Trolling motor plug in, and a DC cigarette Lighter Plug in for my Fillet Knife, or to Charge a Cell Phone, use a spott light, Power a Laptop computer,, J/K about the Lap top.. No Lap tops allowed on my boat.. Only a GPS..

    Hope this helps with some ideas..

    PS, I am on a budget, so I have to put a lot of thought in things before I make modifications to my boat.

    Zivetor...
     

    Attached Files:

  4. zivetor

    zivetor New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Charleston, S.C.
    Here is a better link that will take you right to the pictures of modification.. Click a picture and it will take you to another link with more photos of the project in the making. Enjoy

    http://www.myjonboat.com/hall-of-fame.htm

    Zivetor:big_smile:
     
  5. tofish

    tofish New Member

    Messages:
    3,923
    State:
    arizona
    i put 1/2" plywood that i treated with thompsons. then covered with carpet. could lift in and out. only did floors though. don't have pictures, but felt sturder with it in, and lots easier to walk around. like mentioned before, easy to take out and clean under.
    gary
     
  6. Challenger

    Challenger New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    florida
    I have a 12ft flatbottom boat that I put rivets in the bows to mount a pedestal seat many years ago, with the flex that my boat had when running rough water the bows started cracking at the rivets and eventualy the two front bows broke, I'd say if you do this, make the rivet and hole as small as posible, as few as posible, 3M has a product called 5200, if you don't plan on ever removing this floor, caulk the bows and minimumize the rivets, good luck.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I used treated 3/8" plywood to floor the center part of my 1648 Bigjon, then carpeted it with outdoor carpet. Having the flat floor was nice, but when I got my new 25hp 4-stroke, I had trouble getting it up on plane. A whale tail helped, but not enough. Finally, I checked the flooring. It was so waterlogged that it was all two of us could do to lift it out of the boat. Needless to say, removing that flooring helped my planing problem a lot. LESSON: If you're going to use any kind of wood, make sure you really get it super waterproofed first. Best way I know of is to coat it first with fiberglass resin. Better yet, go with aluminum. If I ever refloor my boat, that's what I'll use; if I can't afford to do it with aluminum, I won't do it at all.
     
  8. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    The best way is to epoxy it being that epoxy is in the neighborhood of
    100% waterproof versus fiberglass resin (polyester or vinylester) not being anywhere close to waterproof. Not to mention those resins and a bond to wood are about next to none compared to epoxy being formulated to bond with wood.

    But the dollar wins out most of the time.
    Most people will chance success over a 50 dollar difference in price even if the product isnt made to do what you are asking of it.

    There aint but one way and its about 80 bucks a gallon.
    Find me something better and I'll build my next boat out of it.

    But if you want to solve the problem of weight and waterproofing right off the bat just buy some NIDACORE and be done with it. Its the best thing since sliced bread in that particular flooring application.
     
  9. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    I used aluminum sheet and pink sheet foam insulation in the bottom of my alumacraft. I did not glue the carpet down though. I built the sheet foam up to be even with the ribs and stretched the carpetover the edges of the aluminum and ducttaped it to the bottom. Then I layed the whole thing down and at each rib I put one self tapping screw thru the carpet aluminum and rib. It has been there for three years now and it still looks good to me. It sits out in the weather all the time.

    The good thing about not gluing it was that if I ever want to change it I just unscrew it and pull the old ducttape off.

    I did it that way so that my kids could walk around easier and did not expect it to last like it has.
     
  10. River_monster91

    River_monster91 New Member

    Messages:
    2,233
    State:
    central kansas
    i would just use some 1/4 inch plywood i think it would be alot cheaper than aluminum
     
  11. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    NIDACORE

    What, how, why??
     
  12. smhmc6

    smhmc6 New Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    I've been considering putting down a floor. As far as plywood goes... I'm a little worried about the weight in a 1436 riveted jon. With only a 3 person weight limit I don't really want to push the weight limit. How much of an issue do you guys think it would be? What about the aluminum sheet and insulation between ribs? You guys say its more expensive... but what are we talkin here?
     
  13. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    No expert here but I am well satisfied with how my boat turned out. I contacted a local metal fabrication shop and found one that stocked 1/4" aluminum diamond tread brite plate. This is similar to the metal that you see truck tool boxes and steps on 18 wheelers made out of.
    As it turned out I bought an entire 4'x8' sheet with 3/4" sheared off of one side. I painted it with self etching automotive primer and when that dried I followed up with several coats of epoxy garage floor paint mixed with a little sand. The combo of the diamond treads and the sand finish epoxy made a surface that is sure grip even when cover with slime, mud, or blood. It will never rot or warp and has zero flex and give under foot. I also do not have to worry about it reacting with my aluminum hull like copper treated plywood can do. Unlike non-treated plywood I can just paint it. I do not have to worry about not getting the wood completely sealed or the epoxy wearing in high traffic areas and then having the plywood swell, warp or rot.

    [​IMG]

    If you use the blue or pink builder's foam under your floor beware of getting gasoline in your bilge. These foams dissolve in petroleum products . I have seen pics of a guy's duck boat that got gas in the bilge and most of his carefully lain foam turned to pink sludge. Closed cell foam is a better choice.
     
  14. tnfishman

    tnfishman New Member

    Messages:
    53
    State:
    tennessee
    I bought the aluminum in 4'x20" sections at the local salvage yard for $45 the sheet foam insulation was about the same price. Not to bad.
     
  15. smhmc6

    smhmc6 New Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    One more question. When it comes to aluminum... how hard is it to cut? This may be a dumb question, but what do you guys use to cut it to the right size? I don't have a torch or know anyone with that kind of stuff. I guess a good bandsaw would work, but don't have one of those either.
     
  16. riddleofsteel

    riddleofsteel New Member

    Messages:
    353
    State:
    NC
    Take it to the local metal shop they will shear it for a minimum charge.
     
  17. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Or, you can use a saws-all with a hacksaw blade, or a regular skil-saw with a metal cutting composition blade. I use those specialized blades on my radial arm saw and cut tile, metal, and anything else I want to cut.
     
  18. sarSWAMPFOX

    sarSWAMPFOX New Member

    Messages:
    381
    State:
    Union, South Caroilna
    In stead of foam insulation, I ask the convience store manager to save me all the plastic signs that they put out on there light poles and around the store. These signs are changed on a regular basis, they normaly throw them away. Cut them into pieces that between the rails and layer them , I use PVC pipe glue to bond them together. Then glue down outdoor carpet on top. Hold up in weather, light weight, gas don't make it melt,easy to remove, and water proof 100 %. Signs = free , Glue = $7.00 a pint , Carpet $ .66 per sq ft = cheaper than aluminium , plywood, epoxy.
     
  19. Hootowlc3

    Hootowlc3 New Member

    Messages:
    409
    State:
    Florida
    If I am not mistaken construction grade insulation will absorb a certain amount of water. That would make your boat really heavy.
     
  20. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I wouldnt bother with any kind of foam unless I was going to permanently seal the compartment its in especially under the floor of a boat.
    Even closed cell foam will absorb water if its in constant contact with water over long periods of time. If the compartment isnt sealed it will stay wet or damp at best.
    Jon boats just arent easy to work with to get a great end result with
    little effort.